Kassilem's (Melissa) 2014 Challenge 2

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Kassilem's (Melissa) 2014 Challenge 2

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1Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Mai 31, 2014, 11:33pm

Here is the second half of 2014's reading! Part 1 can be found HERE

Hello everyone. My name is Melissa. I’m 23 years old, in my last year of college at Boise State University before I head off to the Peace Corps. This will be my fourth year on ‘LT 75 Books Challenge’, and even though I consistently read more than 75 books each year I can’t bring myself to leave this group. So here I am again.

For those who have not followed my threads before, I like to read fantasy, historical fiction & GLBT but that is certainly not all you will see here. I never know what I’ll get my hands on. However if it helps, my favorite authors are as follows: Elizabeth Chadwick, Lynn Flewelling, Terry Goodkind, Robin Hobb, W. A. Hoffman, George R. R. Martin, Sarah Monette, Melanie Rawn, Patrick Rothfuss, Brent Weeks and Bart Yates.

I also keep a thread dedicated to the Graphic Novels I read each year. 2014's GN count can be found HERE

Please feel free to snoop or take/leave recommendations! I’m looking forward to the reading in 2014.

Past '75 Book Challenge' threads:
2011 Challenge Part 1, Part 2
2012 Challenge Part 1
2013 Challenge Part 1, Part 2
2014 Challenge Part 1

Past 'Grapic Novel Count' threads:
2011 GN Count
2012 GN Count
2013 GN Count

Statistics:
Reading Statistics

2Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 31, 2014, 11:45pm

Books Read in 2014

Here starts the challenge! Below will be a condensed list of what I read, while in the posts below I'll put my reviews. Happy reading!!

June:
40. The Jungle Book - Rudyard Kipling (Post 18)
41. Through the Looking Glass - Lewis Carroll (Post 19)
42. The Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams (Post 25)
43. Winne the Pooh – A. A. Milne (Post 29)
44. Blood of Dragons – Robin Hobb (Post 35)
45. The Lost City of Z – David Grann (Post 36)
46. Adam's Navel – Michael Sims (Post 38)
47. Wyrms - Orson Scott Card (Post 42)
48. The White Indian Boy: and its sequel– Elijah Nicholas Wilson & Charles A Wilson (Post 43)
49. Jade Sky - Patrick Freivald (Post 46)
50. Human Nature: Opposing Viewpoints - Mark Ray Schmidt (Post 49)
51. Words of Radiance - Brandon Sanderson (Post 50)
52. Murder of Crows - Anne Bishop (Post 51)
53. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame (Post 56)
54. The Eyre Affair - Jasper Fforde (Post 60)

July:
55. Skin Game - Jim Butcher (Post 66)
56. The City & The City - China Mieville (Post 67)
57. Black Powder War - Naomi Novik (Post 70)
58. A Clash of Kings - George R R Martin (Post 75)
59. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - J. K. Rowling (Post 76)
60. The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms - N. K. Jemisin (Post 79)
61. The Daylight War - Peter V. Brett (Post 83)
62. Enders - Lissa Price (Post 84)
63. Fifty Shades of Grey - E L James (Post 87)

August:
64. The Forever Song - Julie Kagawa (Post 89)
65. Empire of Ivory - Naomi Novik (Post 90)
66. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince - J K Rowling (Post 101)
67. Half a King - Joe Abercrombie (Post 102)
68. Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire - James Lowder (Post 106)
69. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - J K Rowling (Post 107)
70. Love is the Higher Law - David Levithan (Post 108)
71. The Rithmatist - Brandon Sanderson (Post 109)
72. Wide Awake - David Levithan (Post 110)
73. Requiem - Lauren Oliver (Post 111)
74. The Coldest Girl in Coldtown - Holly Black (Post 112)
75. Severed Souls - Terry Goodkind (Post 113)
76. Naomi and ely's No Kiss List - Rachel Cohn & David Levithan (Post 122)
77. Marly's Ghost - David Levithan (Post 123)
78. World War Z - Max Brooks (Post 126)
79. Fool's Assassin - Robin Hobb (Post 127)
80. Animal Farm - George Orwell (Post 130)
81. Coraline - Neil Gaiman (Post 131)
82. Steelheart - Brandon Sanderson (Post 132)
83. How They Met and Other Stories - David Levithan (Post 133)

September:
84. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte (Post 140)
85. Shadow and Bone - Leigh Bardugo (Post 141)
86. Harry Potter's Bookshelf - John Granger (Post 145)
87. Dangerous Women - "Some Desperado" - Joe Abercrombie (Post 146)
88. Dangerous Women - "My Heart Is Either Broken" – Meg Abbott (Post 147)
89. Dangerous Women - "Bombshells" – Jim Butcher (Post 148)
90. Divergent - Veronica Roth (Post 154)
91. Harry Potter Page to Screen - Bob McCabe (Post 155)
92. Hate List - Jennifer Brown (Post 156)
93. The Raven Boys - Maggie Stiefvater (Post 157)

October:
94. Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan - Robin Maxwell (Post 161)
95. The Night Season - Chelsea Cain (Post 162)
96. Kill You Twice - Chelsea Cain (Post 166)
97. Let Me Go - Chelsea Cain (Post 169)
98. The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman (Post 183)
99. Immortal: A Novel of the Fallen Angels - J. R. Ward (Post 191)

Novemeber:
100. Concepts of Genetics - Robert J Brooker (Post 202)
101. A Storm of Swords - George R R Martin (Post 203)
102. A Feast for Crows - George R R Martin (Post 205)

December:
103. The Ice Dragon – George R R Martin (Post 216)
104. Shifting Shadows: Stories from the World of Mercy Thompson - Patricia Briggs (Post 228)
105. American Gods - Neil Gaiman (Post 229)
106. Essential Organic Chemistry - Paula Yurkanis Bruice (Post 237)
107. Invisibility - David Levithan & Andrea Cremer (Post 241)
108. Vengeance - Megan Miranda (Post 248)
109. The Slow Regard of Silent Things - Patrick Rothfuss (Post 261)
110. Throne of Glass - Sarah J. Mass (Post 274)
111. The House of the Four Winds - Mercedes Lackey & James Mallory (Post 278)

3Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 13, 2014, 8:30pm

Off-the-Shelf Challenge
This is a challenge that never seems to end. I can’t seem to get through this list, and I just decided to add all my non-fiction onto the list as well. Hopefully this year I can get through them all since I will be moving overseas in 2015 and won’t be able to bring most of them. So here’s my challenge to myself. Read the below books within the year of 2014.

Black Sun Rising - C. S. Friedman
The Gold Falcon - Katharine Kerr
Banewreaker - Jacqueline Carey
Sacajewea - Anna Lee Waldo
Maia - Richard Adams (Donated 5/3)
Wyrms - Orsen Scott Card (Post 42)
The Magician's Apprentice - Trudi Canavan
Wraeththu - Storm Constantine
The Summoner - Gail Z Martin
The Blood King - Gail Z Martin
People of the Wolf - Kathleen O'Neal Gear (Donated 5/3)
Daughter of the Blood - Anne Bishop
Path of Revenge - Russell Kirkpatrick
Adam's Navel - Michael Sims (Post 38)
A Dance With Dragons - 1:Dreams and Dust - George R. R. Martin
American Gods – Neil Gaiman (Post 229)
Human Nature: Opposing Viewpoints - Mark Ray Schmidt (Post 49)
Pulling Your Own Strings - Dr. Wayne Dyer (Donated 5/3)
A Short History of the World – John M. Roberts (Donated 5/3)
Captain Kidd and the War against the Pirates - Robert Ritchie
Timelines of World History - John B. Teeple
1,000 Years, 1,000 People -Agnes Hooper Gottlieb
Battle Cries - James Inglis
The Atlantis Blueprint: Unlocking the Ancient Mysteries of a Long-Lost Civilization - Colin Wilson (Donated 5/3)
The Complete Book of World History - Carson-Dellosa Publishing
Writing the Breakout Novel - Donald Maass
Techniques of the Selling Writer - Dwight V. Swain

*****

Best-21st-Fantasy Challenge
Here's a list of the best 21st centurt fantasy novels I am intending to read as well. The list was made a few years ago so it doesn't have the newest books on it but I am looking forward to getting into these ones.

Gaiman, Neil : American Gods (Post 229)
Clarke, Susanna : Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
Rothfuss, Patrick : The Name of the Wind (2009)
Mieville, China : The Scar
Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2009)
Martin, George R. R. : A Feast for Crows (2008)
Bujold, Lois McMaster : The Curse of Chalion
Mieville, China : The City & the City (Post 66)
Fforde, Jasper : The Eyre Affair (Post 60)
Gaiman, Neil : Coraline (Post 131)
Wolfe, Gene : The Wizard Knight
Bujold, Lois McMaster : Paladin of Souls
Pratchett, Terry : Going Postal
Pratchett, Terry : Night Watch
Lynch, Scott : The Lies of Locke Lamora
Abercrombie, Joe : The Blade Itself
Gaiman, Neil : The Graveyard Book (Post 182)
Jemisin, N. K. : The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (Post 79)
Le Guin, Ursula K. : Lavinia
Sanderson, Brandon : Mistborn (2012)
Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2008)
Le Guin, Ursula K. : The Other Wind
Gaiman, Neil : Anansi Boys
Novik, Naomi : His Majesty's Dragon (2013)
Kay, Guy Gavriel : Under Heaven

*****

BBC-List-of-Best-100 Challenge
This is a list that BBC put together of the best 100 literary books a person should read. I found it recently on my computer and decided that I should make a goal to read as many of these as I can. These are the books you always hear people talk about and should read so that you can have your own opinion as well.

1 Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen (Post 1.224)
2 The Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
3 Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series - JK Rowling (2009)
5 To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee (2013)
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte (Post 2.140)
8 Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell (2013)
9 His Dark Materials - Philip Pullman (2007)
10 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
11 Little Women - Louisa M Alcott (2005)
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 - Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca - Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien (2013)
17 Birdsong - Sebastian Faulk
18 Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveller’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch - George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald (2008)
23 Bleak House - Charles Dickens
24 War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams (Post 2.25)
26 Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
27 Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky (2009)
28 Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll (Post 1.221)
31 Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy (2013)
32 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis (2005)
34 Emma - Jane Austen
35 Persuasion - Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe - CS Lewis (2005)
37 The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin - Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha - Arthur Golden (2007)
40 Winnie the Pooh - AA Milne (Post 2.29)
42 The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown (2009)
44 A Prayer for Owen Meaney - John Irving
45 The Woman in White - Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables - LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies - William Golding (2007)
50 Atonement - Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi - Yann Martel
52 Dune - Frank Herbert (2011)
53 Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy - Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities - Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera - Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
62 Lolita - Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History - Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas (2013)
66 On The Road - Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure - Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children - Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick - Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens
72 Dracula - Bram Stoker (2013)
73 The Secret Garden - Frances Hodgson Burnett (2007)
74 Notes From A Small Island - Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses - James Joyce
76 The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
77 Swallows and Amazons - Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal - Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair - William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession - AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple - Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary - Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web - EB White (2005)
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven - Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection - Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
93 The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks
95 A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice - Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables - Victor Hugo

4Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 27, 2014, 9:15pm

Reading Bingo Challenge
Ah, I'm a sucker for cool reading memes and challenges, etc. So when I saw this on Judy's and Roni's threads I couldn't help but want to participate as well. :) I wont be "trying" to fill these out, but I think it will be a blast to see if my books fit on it. (PS. This thread is where you can join the party)



Regular Bingo
More than 500 pages: A Game of Thrones
Forgotten Classic: Wuthering Heights
Book that became a movie: Ender's Game
Published this year: Red Rising
Number in the title: Hunter-Gatherer Foraging: Five Simple Models
Written by someone under 30: Throne of Glass
Book with non-human characters: Throne of Jade
Funny Book: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Female Author: Night Broken
Book with a mystery: Fair Game
One-Word Title: Legion
Book of short stories: World War Z
Set on a different continent: Surviving the Extremes
Non-Fiction: When the World Calls
First book by a favourite author:
Heard about online: The Wood of Suicides
Best-selling book: MaddAddam
Based on a true story: A Searing Wind
Book at the bottom of TBR pile: Pride and Prejudice
Book my friend loves: Fifty Shades of Grey
Book that scares me: Oryx and Crake
More than 10 years old: The Wizard of Earthsea
Second book in a series: The Year of the Flood
Blue cover: Human Variation



YA Bingo
Book with female heroine: Once We Were
Book set in a high school: The Realm of Possibility
Last of a trilogy: The Forever Song
Book with a color in the title:
First book in series: Changers Book One: Drew
Book set in the future: Starters
Book with a break-up: Wide Awake
Book without a love triangle: The Eternity Cure
Book that became a movie: Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist
Book set in Paris:
Book set in the past: Love is the Higher Law
Book with magic: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
Book set in summer: Coraline
Book with a dragon: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Book that made you cry:
Graphic novel: A Bride's Story, Vol. 5
Book based on a myth: The Coldest Girl in Coldtown
Classic YA: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Book with a Lion, Witch or Wardrobe: Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince
Book with an incredible fight scene: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Book heard about online: Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians
Book set in another world: Wyrms
Book with epic love story: How They Met and Other Stories
Book with music: Where She Went

5Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 30, 2014, 10:33pm

2013 Statistics (abridged)
*More complete statistics can be found on my Statistic’s page: HERE

Books: 120
Pages: 50,171

~2.3 books per week
~962 pages per week

Time Range: 1870s-2013
Format: Dead Tree (60); Audiobook (60)
Top 3 categories: TBR (41); Walk By-Pick Up (24); Textbook (17)
Top 4 genres: Non-Fiction (32); Epic Fantasy (18); Urban Fantasy (15); Anthropology (15)

5 Stars (12):
Raised By Wolves: Brethren / The Way of Kings / The Immense Journey / The Fault in our Stars / Every Day / A Memory of Light / The Giver / The Alchemist / Bones of Contention / Why Evolution is True / Two Boys Kissing / The Insider's Guide to the Peace Corps

Additonal - Graphic Novels read: 82

***

2012 Statistics (abridged)
*More complete statistics can be found on my Statistic’s page: HERE

Books: 138
Pages: 62,775

~2.6 books per week
~1,203 pages per week

Time Range: 1910s - 2012
Format: Dead Tree (104); Audiobook (34)
Top 3 categories: Walk By-Pick Up (39); Rereads (33); TBR (22)
Top 4 genres: Epic Fantasy (28); GLBT (24); High Fantasy (19); Non-Fiction (18)

5 Stars (38):
In the Hand of the Goddess / Writing to Change the World / The Lover's Dictionary / Stone of Tears / Blood of the Fold / Raised By Wolves: Brethren / Raised by Wolves: Matelot / Raised By Wolves: Treasure / Raised By Wolves: Wolves / Temple of the Winds / A Companion to Wolves / Maledicte / Lord of Chaos / Assassin's Apprentice / Faith of the Fallen / Royal Assassin / Assassin's Quest / Don't Let Me Go / Naked Empire / Golden Fool / Leave Myself Behind / Someday This Pain Will Be Useful To You / Fool's Fate / Something Like Summer / Chainfire / Side Jobs / The Song of Achilles / The Valley of the Horses / The Blinding Knife / Confessor / Break / The Immortal Rules / Dragon Haven / The Gathering Storm / Sociocultural Theory in Anthropology / The Happiness Advantage / Towers of Midnight / Every Day / Cold Days

Additonal - Graphic Novels read: 85

***

2011 Statistics (abridged)
*More complete statistics can be found on my Statistic’s page: HERE

Books: 82
Pages: 39,011

~1.6 books per week
~750 pages per week

Time Range: 1960s - 2011
Format: Dead Tree (73); Audiobook (9)
Top 3 categories: Walk By-Pick Up (28); TBR (22); Off Bookshelf (13)
Top 4 genres: Urban Fantasy (22); High Fantasy (21); Romance (17); Mystery (16)

5 Stars (23):
The Black Prism / Magic's Pawn / Magic's Promise / Magic's Price / Shadow Magic / The Way of the Shadows / A Strong and Sudden Thaw / Beyond the Shadows / The Bone Doll's Twin / Hidden Warrior / The Oracle's Queen / The Wise Man's Fear / Evil at Heart / Wizard's First Rule / White Night / Guns, Germs, and Steel / Changes / The Eye of the World / Melusine / The Virtu / Origins Reconsidered / The Great Hunt / Alanna / A Lady Awakened

Additonal - Graphic Novels read: 226

6Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 4, 2014, 1:12am

My New Years Resolutions

1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
5. Get to the gym four times a week
6. Pay off my car
7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

7MickyFine
Jun. 1, 2014, 1:15am

Hoping it's safe to post. Happy new thread!

8Kassilem
Jun. 1, 2014, 1:57am

Perfectly safe :) Thanks!

I just spent I don't know how long going through my past threads and the books I've read in the last four years. It was kind of fascinating seeing what I wrote - what I liked and didn't like. I even found a bunch of series I had started and never finished to look up this year.

Do any of you ever go back through past threads?

9Kassilem
Jun. 1, 2014, 2:07am

Reading Update:

On Deck:
Adam's Navel - Michael Sims
The White Indian Boy - Elijah Nicholas Wilson
Blood of Dragons - Robin Hobb
Half a King - Joe Abercrombie
Jade Sky - Patrick Freivald
Black Powder War - Naomi Novik

On Itunes Deck:
The Jungle Book - Rudyard Kipling
The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
Through the Looking Glass - Lewis Carroll
The Clash of Kings - George R. R. Martin
Harry Potter and the Order of Pheonix - J. K. Rowling
Words of Radiance - Brandon Sanderson

10PaulCranswick
Jun. 1, 2014, 6:44am

Congratulations on your new thread Melissa. Have a lovely Sunday.

11scaifea
Jun. 1, 2014, 9:43am

Happy New Thread, Melissa!

12lkernagh
Jun. 1, 2014, 12:58pm

Lovely new thread, Melissa!

I do go back through my past threads, usually to see what I wrote about a particular book, as I don't always post reviews to the book page. I was never any good at keeping a diary or journal so I am kind of glad that LT has become that diary/journal for me. ;-)

13MickyFine
Jun. 1, 2014, 2:20pm

I think I might go through my past threads when I hit the five year mark and see what exactly I read. It's nice to know I have that record going back. :)

14PiyushC
Jun. 2, 2014, 10:45am

Found and starred. Interestingly, I have read all the books on your Itunes deck (quite a few of my favourites there) and none of the books on your physical one.

15Kassilem
Jun. 2, 2014, 11:22am

>>10 PaulCranswick:. Thanks Paul, hope you're was great too. I went and saw Maleficent then read manga all night. It wasn't bad.

>>11 scaifea:. Thanks Amber!

>>12 lkernagh:. I was never one to keep a journal either but I LOVE how I can keep track of books here. I've tried other things before - index cards with info on them, an excel sheet, etc. but this is the best way I've found. I'm certainly addicted this this site.

>>13 MickyFine:. I love having that record as well. :)

>>14 PiyushC:. Welcome Piyush! I suppose the pyshcial books are a little odd now that I look at them. Two are early reviewers and two are books I would never have picked up myself except that one was a gift to me and the other is about one of my ancestors. The Hobb and Novik book is more like what you'd usually find on my thread. :)

16saraslibrary
Jun. 2, 2014, 10:09pm

Hi, Melissa! :) *waves*

17Kassilem
Jun. 3, 2014, 12:20am

>16 saraslibrary:. *waves back with a grin* Welcome!

18Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 3, 2014, 12:47am



40. The Jungle Book - Rudyard Kipling
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 160
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Accounts of a courageous youngster and formidable creatures of the Indian jungle abound in this series of 14 imaginative tales. Mowgli, a boy raised by a wolf pack, learns the lore of the jungle from its inhabitants; Rikki-tikki-tavi, a brave mongoose, defeats a deadly cobra; and more.

Thoughts:
I had no idea this book had more than the story of Mowgli. I've never even heard of the other stories although my mother says they are classic stories that she grew up with. And the story of Mowgli is much less than what I expected. I didn’t care too much for most of the other stories, though I now know what Rikki-tikki-tavi and Tomai references mean now. It was more of a book of short stories than anything else, which I usually don’t get into very often. It’s checked off the list though. Don’t regret the read since it was so short.

19Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 3, 2014, 12:46am



41. Through the Looking Glass – Lewis Carroll
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 128
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
The sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland finds Carroll's inquisitive heroine in a fantastic land where everything is reversed. Alice encounters talking flowers, madcap kings and queens, and becomes a pawn in a bizarre chess game involving Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and other amusing nursery-rhyme characters.

Thoughts:
I’ve heard that a lot of people liked this book more than the first, Alice in Wonderland. I found I did myself as well. Perhaps because you get use to the way Carroll writes. Or perhaps because there is more of a goal to the plot here. Alice is working her way to become a queen and the nonsense comes about as she journeys. I’m not entirely sure why this second book caught me more than the first one did, but it did. I liked most everything Alice came across, especially the knights that continued to fall over. It looks as if the Disney movie took from both books to make their classic movie. I also loved the narrator for this book. She did a fantastic job at putting just a touch of incredulity in her voice at the right moments. It was a lovely book to listen to.

Favorite Line:
“I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy, my reality is just different from yours.”

20Thebookdiva
Jun. 3, 2014, 10:26am

Lovely new thread Melissa. I'm happy to hear that you liked Through the Looking Glass, as I am reading both Alice in Wonderland and Through the look glass this week.

21Kassilem
Jun. 3, 2014, 1:43pm

>20 Thebookdiva:. Hello Abigail! They are such "funny" books aren't they. :)

22Thebookdiva
Jun. 3, 2014, 2:08pm

They are very funny. My mum said to go into them not expecting any kind of storyline, so that's what I did, otherwise I don't think I would be enjoying them so much.

23foggidawn
Jun. 3, 2014, 3:04pm

Just dropping by to say hello!

24Kassilem
Jun. 3, 2014, 5:57pm

>22 Thebookdiva:. That's not how I went into it for the first, which is why I expect I didn't like it as much. The second one went along much better because I expected it to not make sense. :)

>23 foggidawn:. Hi foggidawn! I hope your summer is treating you well!

25Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 5, 2014, 12:28pm



42. The Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 224
Rating: 4 Stars
(BBC-TBR)

Summary:
Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last fifteen years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor. Together this dynamic pair begin a journey through space aided by quotes from The Hitchhiker's Guide and a galaxy-full of fellow travelers: Zaphod Beeblebrox--the two-headed, three-armed ex-hippie and totally out-to-lunch president of the galaxy; Trillian, Zaphod's girlfriend; Marvin, a paranoid, brilliant, and chronically depressed robot; and Veet Voojagig, a former graduate student who is obsessed with the disappearance of all the ballpoint pens he bought over the years.

Thoughts:
This was an outrageous, hilarious book. I think I might not have found it so funny except that I just finished reading Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, which prepped me for the nonsense. My brother has been trying to get me to read this book for ages so when I saw it on the ‘BBC great reads’ list and saw the audio was only six hours long, I decided to go for it. I wasn’t sure I’d enjoy it but I did. It’s really kind of ridiculous but that gives it its charm I suppose. Sometimes nonsense is what you need; it livens life up a little, gets you away from the seriousness all around you. That was perfect for me this week. Here’s another classic under my belt that I’m glad I got to.

Favorite Line:
“Ford... you're turning into a penguin. Stop it.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

26foggidawn
Jun. 4, 2014, 4:12pm

>25 Kassilem: Ah, I love HG2G! And I also like the movie, though as with all movies they had to cut some of the good stuff. But Zooey Deschanel plays Trillian, Martin Freeman plays Arthur, Mos Def plays Ford Prefect, Alan Rickman voices Marvin . . . it's a really excellent cast.

27scaifea
Jun. 4, 2014, 4:42pm

Boy, there's some great reading going on here, Melissa...

28Kassilem
Jun. 5, 2014, 12:17pm

>26 foggidawn:. It's a movie I definitely need to watch now :) Unfortunately I don't watch enough to know some of those names :/ but I'll take your word that they are great actors :D I know I've seen a few scenes from the movie on TV before. I'm looking forward to seeing it in its entirety.

>27 scaifea:. :) Thanks! I hope it continues. The BBC list I'm looking to get through does have tons of really good and classic books. I'm sure it will be worth it to read most of the list at least.

29Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 5, 2014, 12:28pm



43. Winne the Pooh – A. A. Milne
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 176
Rating: 3 Stars
(BBC-TBR)

Summary:
Milne wrote the episodic stories of Winnie-the-Pooh for his young son Christopher Robin, whose toy animals were the basis for the characters and whose name was used for the young boy who appears in the tales as the benign master of the animals. The main character, Winnie-the-Pooh, is a good-natured, honey-loving bear who lives in the Forest surrounding the Hundred Acre Wood. His companions are Eeyore, a gloomy gray donkey; Tigger, a frisky tiger; Piglet, a timid pig; Owl, a pontificating bird; the meddlesome Rabbit; and Kanga, an energetic kangaroo whose inquisitive baby, Roo, lives in her pouch.

Thoughts:
If this book wasn’t on the BBC list I’m looking to complete I would never have picked this book up. I never was into Winnie the Pooh as a child. And yet listening to these short stories I remember seeing them somewhere as an animation, so I must have seen the classic stories somewhere – Pooh trying to get honey with a balloon, Pooh saving Piglet from the flood in an upside down umbrella, Pooh giving Eeyore a jar for his birthday, etc. It’s not a book I particularly liked but it wasn’t bad either. And it was only a three hour audio, something I got through very easily. And since it’s a classic it was worth the short listen/read. Now I can say I’ve read it. It’s one of those books.

Favorite Line:
“How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.”

30foggidawn
Jun. 5, 2014, 12:58pm

>28 Kassilem: Really, Rickman (aka Snape) voicing Marvin is all you need to know. He has so many great lines. "I think you ought to know I'm feeling very depressed."

31scaifea
Jun. 6, 2014, 7:42am

I read the Pooh stories aloud to Charlie not too long ago and had the hardest time getting through that last chapter without breaking into uncontrollable sobs. Clearly I have some issues with the idea of Charlie growing up on me. Ha!

32MickyFine
Jun. 6, 2014, 3:15pm

>25 Kassilem: So are you a hoopy frood who knows where her towel is?

>29 Kassilem: I adore Winnie the Pooh but I have loved the books and the film since I was a kid. I always found the metafictional element of the Disney movie super fascinating, even when I was little.

33PiyushC
Jun. 8, 2014, 3:29pm

>25 Kassilem: The Hitchhiker series is a hoot! And one of my favourite series.

34Kassilem
Jun. 8, 2014, 8:51pm

>30 foggidawn:. Ah, I see now. I can just imagine. Now I really need to see the movie :)

>31 scaifea:. :) I think that's true of any parent. I only have my nephew to go off of, but he's ten and a little terror so I can't really relate yet :)

>32 MickyFine:. I do certainly know where my towels are at all times. I even packed one for my vacation this week. Can't go wrong with a towel. I know that now. ;)

>33 PiyushC:. :) It's one I might have to come back to in a few years. I did really like it.

35Kassilem
Jun. 8, 2014, 9:02pm



44. Blood of Dragons – Robin Hobb
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 425
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
The final volume in Robin Hobb's popular Rain Wilds fantasy series, Blood of Dragons completes the story of the dragons, their keepers, and their quest to find the lost city of Kelsingra—and the mythical silver wells that the dragons need to survive. Can Tintaglia and the Elderlings unlock the secrets of the ancient city? Or are they doomed to extinction?

Thoughts:
This is the last volume of Robin Hobb’s Rain Wilds series and now I’m all caught up again on her bibliography. I’d be more upset about that if she didn’t have another book coming out this fall, Fool’s Assassin, which I’m just dying to get. I’m sure that book will be just as good as this book and series, if not better since I’m so in love with the character Fitz. I’ve loved everything I’ve read of Hobb’s and I doubt that will change anytime soon. Hobb has a tendency to write some depressing material because of the honest way she depicts human greediness and deceit, etc, but I thought this series had less of that than normal. But even when she does give the nitty gritty, she gives us good endings. In this last book of the Rain Wild series, it was a good ending. I admit I thought it could have been drawn out a little more but still it was a good ending to the series. In the end I didn’t like this series as much as the Farseer series. I do like that it’s connected to her Liveship series, one I am going to have to go back and reread soon. This book and series are recommended if you like fantasy and especially if you like Robin Hobb.

Favorite Line:
“A man’s deep friendships were the most important thing he could possess. Things can be broken, or lost. All a man can keep for certain are the things in his mind and heart.”

36Kassilem
Jun. 8, 2014, 9:15pm



45. The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon – David Grann
Genre: Non-Fiction, Memoir
Pages: 448
Rating: 4 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.

Thoughts:
For some reason I had thought this book was about vampires. I have no idea why because it’s nothing related. Maybe just the narrative in the beginning describing the horrors and dangers of the Amazon which has men flat on their backs sick and dead in days. Who knows? Once I cleared up what it was about it turned out I enjoyed the narrative more than I thought I would. I never knew anything about Percy Fawcett, didn’t even know this was non-fiction until I looked his name up (my observation skills must be lacking this week). When I realized this was a true story I was even more interested in the book. I’ve always liked learning about explorers. Learning about the Amazon itself and its multiple dangers was gross but very educational. Wondering what happened to Fawcett was sort of thrilling. Isn’t it always when someone is so present in the media and then just disappear? Anyways, suffice to say I liked the book. Probably won’t ever read it again but pretty glad I got to it finally. It looks like a movie based on this book is coming out in the next few years too with Brad Pitt starring as Fawcett. I’d be interested in seeing how a movie does against this book. Recommended if you like reading about explorers.

Favorite Line:
“Much of the discovery of the world was based on failure rather than on success--on tactical errors and pipe dreams.”

37ronincats
Jun. 8, 2014, 9:18pm

*lurk*

38Kassilem
Jun. 9, 2014, 12:50am



46. Adam's Navel: A Natural and Cultural History of the Human Form – Michael Sims
Genre: Non-Fiction, Anthropology
Pages: 352
Rating: 4 Stars
(Off Bookshelves)

Summary:
In this amusing and brilliantly conceived book, Michael Sims introduces you to your body. Moving from head to toe, Sims blends cultural history with evolutionary theory to produce a wonderfully original narrative in which he analyzes the visible parts of the body. In this fascinating brew of science and storytelling, readers encounter not only accessible explanations of the mechanics of their anatomy, but also the layers of mythology, religious lore, history, Darwinian theory, and popular culture that have helped to shape our understanding of any given body part. A titillating and unique book, Adam’s Navel is learned and entertaining, a marvelous lens through which to study the form we all inhabit—but may not really understand.

Thoughts:
This is not a book that is easily read in a few sittings. It’s littered with so many little facts that you have to put it down every once in a while to just take in all you’ve just read. But it’s pretty readable if you take your time. I’ve heard some of the evolutionary theories as to why we look the way we do or why we’re upright etc that most of those were not new to me, but all the other, cultural and psychological theories were all new. I learned a bunch reading this book, even though it’s things that won’t necessarily stay with me long term. Recommended if you like learning about the body.

Favorite Line:
Carl Sagan caught the attention of college audiences on his lecture tours by pointing out that, if aliens are watching us from outer space, they must be assuming that automobiles are the dominant life-form; we service them, maintain them, fuel them, house them, and build roads for their convenience rather than our own.
(Pg. 307)

39drneutron
Jun. 9, 2014, 8:20am

The Lost City of Z was a fave of mine a few years back. Have you tried The River of Doubt? More Amazonian exploration, this time by Teddy Roosevelt and one of his sons. Plus Candice Millard is a great writer!

40PiyushC
Jun. 10, 2014, 10:46am

>35 Kassilem: Rain Wilds series is one I haven't gotten around to, yet.

41Kassilem
Jun. 10, 2014, 1:33pm

>37 ronincats:. :)

>39 drneutron:. I haven't read The River of Doubt. I'll have to take a look at it. Thanks!

>40 PiyushC:. If you like Robin Hobb I highly recommened it. :)

42Kassilem
Jun. 12, 2014, 12:56am



47. Wyrms – Orson Scott Card
Genre: Science Fiction
Pages: 246
Rating: 3 Stars
(Off Bookshelves)

Summary:
The sphere is alien in origin, but has been controlled by man for millennia. A legend as old as the stars rules this constructed world: When the seventh seventh seventh human Heptarch is crowned, he will be the Kristos and will bring eternal salvation or the destruction of the cosmos. Patience is the only daughter of the rightful Heptarch, but she, like her father before her, serves the usurper who has destroyed her family. For she has learned the true ruler’s honor: Duty to one’s race is more important than duty to one’s self. But the time for prudence has passed, and that which has slept for ages has awakened. And Patience must journey to the heartsoul of this planet to confront her destiny . . . and her world's.

Thoughts:
I didn’t like this book as much as I thought I might, but then I wasn’t going off of anything really for that basis. I found I had to put this book down every once in a while because I got tired of it. That could have been because I was in a car for hours on end while reading this book but I’m positive it was also the book that didn’t hold my attention. The first half did more than the second half. And yet it wasn’t a bad story. The central theme seemed to be temptation and free will, which was a good theme, but I thought there could have been more there. But that might just be Card’s writing style. It’s a book that might need a second read through to get more out of it. Not my favorite of Cards’ books, but not bad either.

Favorite Line:
“If human beings are all monsters, why should I sacrifice anything for them?"
"Because they are beautiful monsters..., And when they live in a network of peace and hope, when they trust the world and their deepest hungers are fulfilled, then within that system, that delicate web, there is joy. That is what we live for, to bind the monsters together, to murder their fear and give birth to their beauty.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

43Kassilem
Jun. 14, 2014, 9:39pm



48. The White Indian Boy: and its sequel The Return of the White Indian Boy – Elijah Nicholas Wilson & Charles A Wilson
Genre: Memoir
Pages: 395
Rating: 4 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
First published in 1910, The White Indian Boy quickly became a western classic. Readers fascinated by real-life 'cowboys and Indians' thrilled to Nick Wilson’s frontier exploits, as he recounted running away to live with the Shoshone in his early teens, riding for the Pony Express, and helping settle Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The volume was so popular that Wilson’s son Charles was compelled to write a second book, The Return of the White Indian, which picks up in 1895 where the first memoir ends, telling the adventures of Nick Wilson’s later life. These books, published here as a single volume, are testaments to a unique time and place in American history. Because he had a heart for adventure and unusual proficiency with Native American languages, Wilson’s life became an historical canvas on which was painted both the exploration and the closing of a frontier, as he went from childhood among the Shoshone to work as an interpreter for the U.S. government on Indian reservations in Wyoming and Idaho in his later years. This volume includes new introductory material, a family tree, and a background of Indian-white relations in Jackson Hole. Packed with amazing details about life in the Old West, Wilson’s colorful escapades are once again available to a new generation of readers.

Thoughts:
I picked this book up because I was told the Elijah Nicholas Wilson was related to me on my grandfather’s side. I thought it would be interesting to read a book on one of my ancestors. And it was for the most part. Knowing you’re related to someone makes reading about their life very interesting. I did eventually look up how I was related since I didn’t see my grandfather’s name pop up anywhere in the book. It turns out Elijah’s daughter, Harriet, married a man and had a daughter who married into the family and had a son who was my grandfather’s father…. Confusing. I don’t know what that makes Elijah to me. But essentially my grandfather’s grandfather married the daughter of Elijah’s daughter. More removed than I expected from all the family talk. But still the book was fairly fascinating. When Elijah’s story began to wane I found I enjoyed reading about life in the 1800 in the wild west. I’ve always loved learning about the wild west and this had plenty of it, including the transition from the wild west to the colonized west. It wasn’t always an easy read, and dragged a little here in there, but it was a good book. There was even some great photos in the book that helped illustrate stories and events. I’m glad I got to it.

Favorite Line:
“Truly, Nick Wilson played a part in history, and the settling of the west, that cannot be surpassed or maybe even equaled by any man.”
(Pg. 350)

44Thebookdiva
Jun. 17, 2014, 9:46am

*waves* great reviews. I love how you post a favorite line, I may have to steal that.

45Kassilem
Jun. 17, 2014, 11:19am

>44 Thebookdiva:. :) Thanks! I love the favorite lines too. I especially love to go back through my past threads and reread the quotes sometimes. They can sometimes wow me even now, again. It gets harder to do as I listen to more audio books now than pyshically reading but goodreads.com has some quotes from books and I can usually find one there that I remember hearing and liking.

46Kassilem
Jun. 18, 2014, 2:54pm



49. Jade Sky – Patrick Freivald
Genre: Science Fiction
Pages: 234
Rating: 3 Stars
(Early Reviewer)

Summary:
Matt Rowley hasn't been human for years. A commando for the International Council on Augmented Phenomena, he hunts down superhuman monsters the military can't handle. But his abilities come with a price: bloodthirsty whispers that urge him to acts of terrible violence. An encounter with a giant, angelic being with wings of smoke and shadow casts him into a world of inhuman brutality, demonic possession, and madness, where he must choose between his family and his soul.

Thoughts:
I forget why I choose this book off the Early Reviewer list but I did and then it sat for a long time while I found other books to read. But eventually that deadline looms and you know you have to pick it up. I don’t know why I was dreading it so much. It wasn’t a bad story. Perhaps that whole ‘have to read so don’t want to read’ mood. Regardless the book isn’t something I would read again, but it kept me entertained. The thought the fight scenes were a little choppy but the rest flowed fine. I also thought more could have been explained about the background and the conflict. I did like the idea of augmented humans. Kind of like real superheroes except for the hero part. There was plenty of hard core gore here so beware. Recommened if you like betrayal-crime stories/humans-with-superpowers/short-and-sweet.

47saraslibrary
Jun. 18, 2014, 4:53pm

I won Jade Sky, but I still haven't read it. I'm kind of in that same rut: ‘have to read so don’t want to read’. I'll get around it. Eventually. ;)

48Kassilem
Jun. 19, 2014, 2:19pm

49Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jun. 19, 2014, 2:41pm



50. Human Nature: Opposing Viewpoints – Mark Ray Schmidt
Genre: Non-Fiction, Philosophy
Pages: 140
Rating: 3 Stars
(Off Bookshelves)

Summary:
A combination of topic choice and a dependably evenhanded approach makes this one of the stronger Opposing Viewpoints volumes. Each essay or fiction excerpt is prefaced by a brief summary of the theme (rather than just the content) of the work; open-ended questions printed before the essay invite reflection on the philosophies being extolled; and often divergent arguments appear back-to-back for easy comparison. Especially impressive is the expansiveness of the editor's philosophical net. Science, psychology, religion, and sociology blend effortlessly to share credible theories worth much discussion and contemplation. Renowned thinkers such as Freud, Pascal, Rousseau, Sartre, Darwin, and even Apostle Paul offer not only divergent assessments of human behavior, gender roles, and socialization but also impressively deep explorations for essays so brief. Sections from this book will provide useful curriculum support in many disciplines.

Thoughts:
While this book was very short, I had a hard time reading it. I really enjoyed the chapter prefaces and introductions of each viewpoint but the essays are all original and the language got me on many of the older ones. I really had to concentrate to understand what was being said, which lowered my enjoyment significantly. Other parts I had no problem with. The topic itself, does human nature exist and how does it affect us, was very intriguing - a topic I have come across many times in my field of study and relate to very well. I do recommend the book for those interested in the different perspectives: Human nature being shaped by genetics versus society; Has human nature been corrupted; why humans conflict with each other; why there are conflicts between men and women; and whether human nature can be destroyed or not. It’s pretty deep in places but has some great observations from some very prominent people.

Favorite Line:
‘For my own part, I would as soon be descended fro that heroic little monkey, who braved his dreaded enemy in order to save the life of his keeper, or from that old baboon, who descending from the mountains, carried away in triumph his young comrade from a crowd of astonished dogs – as from a savage who delights to torture his enemies, offers up bloody sacrifices, practices infanticide without remorse, treats his wives like slaves, knows no decency, and is haunted by the grossest superstitions.’
(Charles Darwin, Pg 81)

50Kassilem
Jun. 21, 2014, 3:20am



51. Words of Radiance – Brandon Sanderson
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 1,088
Rating: 5 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Expected by his enemies to die the miserable death of a military slave, Kaladin survived to be given command of the royal bodyguards, a controversial first for a low-status "darkeyes." Now he must protect the king and Dalinar from every common peril as well as the distinctly uncommon threat of the Assassin, all while secretly struggling to master remarkable new powers that are somehow linked to his honorspren, Syl. Brilliant but troubled Shallan strives along a parallel path. Despite being broken in ways she refuses to acknowledge, she bears a terrible burden: to somehow prevent the return of the legendary Voidbringers and the civilization-ending Desolation that will follow. The secrets she needs can be found at the Shattered Plains, but just arriving there proves more difficult than she could have imagined.

Thoughts:
I’m not even sure I can describe this book accurately. There is so much that goes on here (there ought to be in a book with over a thousand pages, right?). While the book is extremely long, the length allows for great development in the characters. It’s really like its four books all put together which as just fine with me. Personally I can never get enough of Kaladin. Shallan I don’t like as much but she definitely grew on me throughout the book; especially now that the readers know why she tries so hard to be sassy and funny all the time. I liked that justice was served to the characters instead of being drawn out and out into later books. I did have to refresh my memory when I first started reading this as I had unfortunately forgot a few facts during the publishing break between the first book and this second one. If I hadn’t done some research I probably would have remembered as Sanderson does put some reminders in here but they are spaced far apart throughout the book. I definitely recommend a refresher online or somewhere if it has been a while since you’ve read the first book The Way of Kings. This book is definitely on par with the first book. This is Sanderson at his best. His original ideas on fantastical magical systems is always impressive as well as his writing ability. And his ability to write so much in such a short time period! He is cranking out the novels! Sanderson is definitely an author I will read everything of. I am very excited for the next book in this series. I can’t remember if this is supposed to be a long series or not and there is sure to be a long wait (although not as long as some other series I know) before the third book is finished, but I am eagerly awaiting that day. This series is highly recommended to all fantasy fans.

Favorite Line:
‘A woman's strength should not be in her role, whatever she chooses to be, but in the power to choose that role.’

51Kassilem
Jun. 24, 2014, 2:21pm



52. Murder of Crows – Anne Bishop
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 368
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
After winning the trust of the terra indigene residing in the Lakeside Courtyard, Meg Corbyn has had trouble figuring out what it means to live among them. As a human, Meg should be barely tolerated prey, but her abilities as a cassandra sangue make her something more. The appearance of two addictive drugs has sparked violence between the humans and the Others, resulting in the murder of both species in nearby cities. So when Meg has a dream about blood and black feathers in the snow, Simon Wolfgard—Lakeside’s shape-shifting leader—wonders if their blood prophet dreamed of a past attack or a future threat. As the urge to speak prophecies strikes Meg more frequently, trouble finds its way inside the Courtyard. Now, the Others and the handful of humans residing there must work together to stop the man bent on reclaiming their blood prophet—and stop the danger that threatens to destroy them all.

Thoughts:
I knew getting into a book would be hard after loving the last one I read so much so at first I struggled with getting into this one. But once I did, I enjoyed it. There was a lot more politics and intrigue present here than I expected and less romance. It was a pleasant surprise. And while there was no romance between Simon and Meg there is development growing there. The book does a good job of making the reader side with the terra indigene rather than the humans. There is still no hiding that the Others are scary and do eat humans but the humans don’t treat the Cassandra sangue any better really. There was actually more disturbing violence in this book than the first one of the series, and it wasn’t the terra indigene, the Others, that disturbed me. Humans are disgusting beings sometimes, something I know is a reality not just fiction. This book brings that forwards as a focus, how greedy some people can be, and how greedy as a race humans are in general to survive with our rising population levels. I liked the first book better than this second one, but there were some very important things that took place in this volume which will have a lot of bearing on the rest of the series. The next book is set to come out in March 2015; I will be waiting for it.

Favorite Line:
“Are there weapons in a bookstore?'
'It's a store full of books, which are objects that can be thrown as well as read,' Monty replied blandly.
The Crows cocked his head. 'I had no idea you humans lived with so much danger.”

52lkernagh
Jun. 24, 2014, 9:37pm

Great batch of reading and I love the favorite quotes for both Hitchhiker's Guide and Murder of Crows!

53Kassilem
Jun. 24, 2014, 10:22pm

>52 lkernagh:. I think I burst out laughing at the quote for Hitchhiker's guide. It was definetly my favorite. :)

54MickyFine
Jun. 25, 2014, 3:09pm

>53 Kassilem: The paragraph describing the history of Vogon poetry always cracks me up.

55Kassilem
Jun. 25, 2014, 3:51pm

>54 MickyFine:. Ah the whole book is hilarious :) I'm definetly going to have to read it again!

56Kassilem
Jun. 25, 2014, 4:02pm



53. The Wind in the Willows - Kenneth Grahame
Genre: Lit Classic
Pages: 236
Rating: 3 Stars
(BBC-TBR)

Summary:
The Wind in the Willows is a classic of children's literature by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animal characters in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames valley.

Thoughts:
I did not get into this book at all. I’ve never really been into the books about anthropomorphized animals as it is. I never read this book as a child either, and it seems it would have been better if I had. I thought there were fast parts and then slow parts but no consistent pace. And I didn’t really like Toad all that much. Rat and Mole were more to my liking. There were certainly undertones to the book but I thought it was a little long for a children’s audience. It’s checked off my BBC List reads now and I can now say I’ve read it and may read it to my children in the future but that’s about all I really got out of it.

57foggidawn
Jun. 25, 2014, 5:17pm

>56 Kassilem: I also never read The Wind in the Willows as a kid, and am hesitant to read it now for the same reasons you mention. If I had a child to read it to, I might do so, but as it is, I will probably leave it alone.

58saraslibrary
Jun. 25, 2014, 5:33pm

I'm glad I'm not the only one who didn't read it as a child. :) I may still read it, but no rush. I vaguely remember the animated movie, so I'll stick with that for now.

59Kassilem
Jun. 28, 2014, 10:49pm

>57 foggidawn:. Yes, I would never have picked it up myself excpet that it's on the best 20th century fantasy list which I have obessively decided to read all of :)

>58 saraslibrary:. :)

60Kassilem
Jun. 28, 2014, 11:41pm



54. The Eyre Affair - Jasper Fforde
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 400
Rating: 3 Stars
(Best 21st c. Fantasy-TBR)

Summary:
Fans of Douglas Adams and P. G. Wodehouse will love visiting Jasper Fforde's Great Britain, circa 1985, when time travel is routine, cloning is a reality (dodos are the resurrected pet of choice), and literature is taken very, very seriously: it’s a bibliophile’s dream. England is a virtual police state where an aunt can get lost (literally) in a Wordsworth poem and forging Byronic verse is a punishable offense. All this is business as usual for Thursday Next, renowned Special Operative in literary detection. But when someone begins kidnapping characters from works of literature and plucks Jane Eyre from the pages of Brontë's novel, Thursday is faced with the challenge of her career.

Thoughts:
This is a book on a (the?) ‘Best 21 c. Fantasy Novels’ which is why I picked it up. I liked the way that literature is so important in this futuristic world. And I liked Thursday. The story itself was pretty engaging with some tiny bit of mystery and thrill. Mostly it felt more like a crime story centered around books. Fascinating, but crime solving/fighting has never been big on my reading likes. If it wasn’t centered around literature I probably wouldn’t have liked it as much as I did. I do give props for originality as it was the first of its kind I have read. I like to imagine what our world will turn out to be like and thus I do enjoy books that touch on the possibilities. Perhaps I might have gotten more out of the book if I had read Jane Eyre itself beforehand but I have not yet got to that classic. There was a lot of literary references and I’m sure I only caught half of them if that. Which is partly why I’m looking to read these popular books and the older ‘classic’ books. This book being one of the former, I’m glad I got to it. I am certainly looking forward to Jane Eyre, and William Shakespeare when I get to them as I have learned a lot about the two while listening to this particular book. Recommended to anyone who is a complete book nerd.

Favorite Line:
“Religion isn't the cause of wars, it's the excuse.”

61Kassilem
Jun. 28, 2014, 11:42pm

Reading Stats: June

Books: 15
Pages: 5,020

Format:
Dead Tree: 6
Audiobook: 9

Category:
TBR: 7
New: 2
Off Bookshelves: 3
Walk By-Pick Up: 2
Early Reviewer: 1

Stars:
5 Stars: 1
4 Stars: 6
3 Stars: 8

Time Range:
1870-1879: 1
1890-1899: 1
1900-1910: 1
1920-1929: 1
1980-1989: 2
1990-1999: 2
2000-2009: 2
2010-2014: 5

Genres:
Lit Classics: 5
Non-Fiction: 3
Memoir: 2
Science Fiction: 2
Urban Fantasy: 2
High Fantasy: 1
Epic Fantasy: 1
Anthropology: 1
Philosophy: 1

Graphic Novels read: 16 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

62Kassilem
Jun. 30, 2014, 12:48am

I can't help it. I'm such a sucker for book memes. Here's one I got from Ronincats & LizzieD.

The assignment is to compose a passage using bites from 6 books from my bookshelves.

1. A title that includes a color. Use the first sentence.
2 A title that includes an animal. Use the second sentence on page 50.
3. A title that includes a first name. Use the third sentence on page 100.
4. A title that includes a place. Use the fourth sentence on page 150.
5. A title that includes a weather event. Use the next-to-last sentence on page 200.
6. A title that includes a plant. Use the final sentence in the book.

MY TRY
1. Black Sun Rising
2. Clan of the Cave Bear
3. Sacajawea
4. East
5. Cold Days
6. The Knight and the Rose

She wondered why she was afraid to go home. They must have been testing me, testing my leadership. From that time on he could not treat Sacajawea merely as a sex object. At home I was used to sleeping with as least my two sister, and I felt lonely and strange, lying by myself in that large bed. They read: Merlin. "Would you care to find out?"

hmmm.... interesting :)

63ronincats
Jun. 30, 2014, 12:09pm

Made about as much sense as mine! ;-)

64RosyLibrarian
Jun. 30, 2014, 5:22pm

Oh man, your last thread never kicked over to your new thread so I hadn't been by to say hello. So, hello!

65Kassilem
Jun. 30, 2014, 10:14pm

>63 ronincats:. :) hehe. Ah, as you warned, its for silliness.

>64 RosyLibrarian:. Welcome. I mixed up posting the ne thread so it was less obvious that usual. I apolpgize but am glad you were able to make your way over! Hello back :)

66Kassilem
Jul. 1, 2014, 3:10pm



55. Skin Game - Jim Butcher
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 452
Rating: 5 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Because as Winter Knight to the Queen of Air and Darkness, Harry never knows what the scheming Mab might want him to do. Usually, it’s something awful. He doesn’t know the half of it…
Mab has just traded Harry’s skills to pay off one of her debts. And now he must help a group of supernatural villains—led by one of Harry’s most dreaded and despised enemies, Nicodemus Archleone—to break into the highest-security vault in town, so that they can then access the highest-security vault in the Nevernever. It's a smash and grab job to recover the literal Holy Grail from the vaults of the greatest treasure hoard in the supernatural world—which belongs to the one and only Hades, Lord of the freaking Underworld and generally unpleasant character. Worse, Dresden suspects that there is another game afoot that no one is talking about. And he's dead certain that Nicodemus has no intention of allowing any of his crew to survive the experience. Especially Harry. Dresden's always been tricky, but he's going to have to up his backstabbing game to survive this mess—assuming his own allies don’t end up killing him before his enemies get the chance.

Thoughts:
This is one of those books you stay up all night to read because you can’t put it down. At least, I couldn’t. It’s so action packed and so Harry. I’m so glad Harry is back and speaking with his old friends again. As we can see in this book he needs his friends to remind him when he’s taking too much blame on himself. There was one part towards the end where I felt the flow of the book stuttered a little. Sometimes writers back their characters into a hole so deep it’s hard to get them out again. Butcher does this well and realistically most of the time. As I said, a little stutter but nothing that caused me to want to rate the book lower. Books have faults, but I thought this one had very little faults. I loved the scene where Harry meets his daughter for the first time since the 12th book. It was perfect. I am very glad there is more to come in this series. Supposedly five more books left. It’s gonna be another long wait for the next book but I’ll be awaiting it eagerly. Highly recommended.

Favorite Line:
‘”Right calf,” Karrin said, bringing Valmont in out of the cold and locking the door behind her. “He’s been shot.”
“And you’re letting him walk around on it?” Butters demanded.
Karrin gave him a look that would have curdled milk. “Next time I’ll stick him in my purse.”
(Pg. 85)

67Kassilem
Jul. 2, 2014, 3:00pm



56. The City & The City - China Mieville
Genre: Science Fiction, Mystery
Pages: 352
Rating: 2 Stars
(Best 21st c. Fantasy - TBR)

Summary:
When a murdered woman is found in the city of Beszel, somewhere at the edge of Europe, it looks to be a routine case for Inspector Tyador Borlú of the Extreme Crime Squad. To investigate, Borlú must travel from the decaying Beszel to its equal, rival, and intimate neighbor, the vibrant city of Ul Qoma. But this is a border crossing like no other, a journey as psychic as it is physical, a seeing of the unseen. With Ul Qoman detective Qussim Dhatt, Borlú is enmeshed in a sordid underworld of nationalists intent on destroying their neighboring city, and unificationists who dream of dissolving the two into one. As the detectives uncover the dead woman’s secrets, they begin to suspect a truth that could cost them more than their lives. What stands against them are murderous powers in Beszel and in Ul Qoma: and, most terrifying of all, that which lies between these two cities.

Thoughts:
If I didn’t want to read the whole ‘Best 21st century Fantasy list’ I would have put this book down a third of the way through. I think so of it was the narrator of the audio book I listened to – I felt he had a bit of a monotone. And the author – sometimes you can just sit back and take in a story, other times you have to really concentrate to parse out what the author is saying. I felt this book was in between. And those two things together made this a hard read/listen. Also, as I have mentioned before, mystery and crime stories just don’t intrigue me as much as most other books, thus I wasn’t stuck looking forward to the story. This was more of a ‘let’s just finish this’ kind of book for me. Not my cup of tea unfortunately. However, the idea of two cities interlocked together where the populations are taught to unsee or unhear anything that’s in the other city even if it’s right in front of you is very interesting. And yet it was so confusing at first that I had to go online to really understand that setting. It’s definitely not a bad book and I bet there are a lot of people that would like it. Just not me.

68lkernagh
Jul. 3, 2014, 9:54am

Monotone narrators don't work very well for me. I haven't tried to listen to any Mieville works. Not sure how that would work for me. Some books I need to see the words to grasp the story better, but my current audio 'read' Anna Karenina is working well as an audiobook, whereas my previous attempt to read it failed miserably.

69Kassilem
Jul. 10, 2014, 5:20pm

>68 lkernagh:. It's funny how soem books just aren't the same unless your listening to them and others only if you have the hardcopy in your hand. I have a few stories I refuse to listen to because I just have to have them in my hand, but others I wouldn't have been able to get through without the audio. :) I also listened to Anna Karenina on audio myself last year. That's one I don't think I could have got through otherwise.

70Kassilem
Jul. 12, 2014, 5:09pm



57. Black Powder War - Naomi Novik
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 365
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
After their fateful adventure in China, Capt. Will Laurence of His Majesty’s Aerial Corps and his extraordinary dragon, Temeraire, are waylaid by a mysterious envoy bearing urgent new orders from Britain. Three valuable dragon eggs have been purchased from the Ottoman Empire, and Laurence and Temeraire must detour to Istanbul to escort the precious cargo back to England. Time is of the essence if the eggs are to be borne home before hatching. Yet disaster threatens the mission at every turn–thanks to the diabolical machinations of the Chinese dragon Lien, who blames Temeraire for her master’s death and vows to ally herself with Napoleon and take vengeance. Then, faced with shattering betrayal in an unexpected place, Laurence, Temeraire, and their squad must launch a daring offensive. But what chance do they have against the massed forces of Bonaparte’s implacable army?

Thoughts:
I took a long time getting through this book for some reason. Sometimes you just get into moods right. I think that was the case here because there is not anything in particular at fault with the book that caused the drawn out reading. The language is little more formal than most of what I read but that makes sense as it’s partially historical and more authentic as a result. The pace is pretty “patient” as one review puts it, as well. The book has plenty of action to it, but it’s not the action that keeps me up at night reading it. I knew the series wasn’t only three books long so the ending didn’t surprise me like it seemed to do for some readers. I think there’s at least four more books out and that might not even be the end. I am looking forward to the next book to see what happens. This one will just be the lower rated one in the series for me.

71Thebookdiva
Jul. 13, 2014, 11:34am

Morning Melissa! Very nice reviews.

72Kassilem
Jul. 13, 2014, 10:06pm

>71 Thebookdiva:. Thank you :) I hope you have a wonderful week

73PiyushC
Jul. 17, 2014, 12:19pm

>50 Kassilem: Glad to see another Sanderson fan. I am not sure if you know, Legion: Skin Deep is expected to come out later this year.

74Kassilem
Jul. 17, 2014, 8:42pm

>73 PiyushC:. A huge Sanderson fan :) And I didn't know that. That will have to go on the 'New' TBR list. Thanks!!

75Kassilem
Jul. 17, 2014, 11:57pm



58. A Clash of Kings - George R R Martin
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 768
Rating: 5 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
A comet the color of blood and flame cuts across the sky. Two great leaders—Lord Eddard Stark and Robert Baratheon—who hold sway over an age of enforced peace are dead, victims of royal treachery. Now, from the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding shores of Winterfell, chaos reigns. Six factions struggle for control of a divided land and the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms, preparing to stake their claims through tempest, turmoil, and war. It is a tale in which brother plots against brother and the dead rise to walk in the night. Here a princess masquerades as an orphan boy; a knight of the mind prepares a poison for a treacherous sorceress; and wild men descend from the Mountains of the Moon to ravage the countryside. Against a backdrop of incest and fratricide, alchemy and murder, victory may go to the men and women possessed of the coldest steel...and the coldest hearts. For when kings clash, the whole land trembles.

Thoughts:
Here’s another five star of the year, even if it’s a reread. I needed to reread this series though before heading into the fifth book, because it’s been a long time since I went through this series. The story is so complicated and involved and LONG – it’s a lot to remember. Also since I have become an avid fan of the new HBO TV show based on the series I needed a refresher on what really happened in the books and what was just in the show. Surprisingly, or maybe not so surprising was the amount that the TV show changed. I think it goes back to the fact that this is a freaking involved story. I love watching characters grow, so this is right up my alley. At least those characters that don’t die that is. I love how realistic the story is – the gore and fifth and evilness alongside the glory and success. This is how I imagine the medieval era felt like – the rich play their games and the poor and innocent suffer for it, as one example. This IS fantastic story-telling with a lot to offer to the reader. It is also depressingly depressing, so beware that fact. It’s also a very long series with long books and long waits in between the books – another warning. There’s flaws, there always is, and different flaws for different readers. But the good rules out in my opinion. But if you are a fantasy fan and have not read this series it definitely deserves your attention. This will be a series that goes down in history, I can promise.

Favorite Line:
“Oh, I think not,” Varys said, swirling the wine in his cup. “Power is a curious thing, my lord. Perchance you have considered the riddle I posed you that day in the inn?”
“It has crossed my mind a time or to,” Tyrion admitted. “The king, the priest, the rich man—who lives and who dies? Who will the swordsman obey? It’s a riddle without an answer, or rather, two many answers. All depends on the man with the sword.”
“And yet he is no one,” Varys said. “He has neither crown nor gold nor favor of the gods, only a piece of pointed steel.”
“That piece of steel is the power of life and death.”
“Just so…yet if it is the swordsmen who rule us in truth, who do we pretend our kings hold the power? Why should a strong man with a sword ever obey a child king like Joffrey, or a wine-sodden oaf like his father?”
“Because these child kings and drunken oafs can call other strong men, with other swords.”
“Then these other swordsmen have the true power. Or do they?” Varys smiled. “Some say knowledge is power. Some tell us that all power comes from the gods. Others say it derives from law. Yet that day on the steps of Baelor’s Sept, our godly High Septon and the lawful Queen Regent and your ever-so-knowledgeable servant were as powerless as any cobbler or cooper in the crowd. Who truly killed Eddard Stark, do you think? Joffrey, who gave the command? Ser Ilyn Payne, who swung the sword? Or…another?”
Tyrion cocked his head sideways. “Did you mean to answer your damned riddle, or only to make my head ache worse?”
Varys smiled. “Here, then. Power resides where men believe it resides. No more and no less.”

76Kassilem
Jul. 22, 2014, 7:35pm



59. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - J. K. Rowling
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 870
Rating: 5 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
As his fifth year at Hogwarts 15-year-old Harry Potter is in full-blown adolescence, complete with regular outbursts of rage, a nearly debilitating crush, and the blooming of a powerful sense of rebellion. Returning to Hogwarts will be a relief... or will it? The fifth bookfollows the darkest year yet for our young wizard. Somehow over the summer, gossip has turned Harry's tragic and heroic encounter with Voldemort at the Triwizard Tournament into an excuse to ridicule and discount the teen. Even Professor Dumbledore, headmaster of the school, has come under scrutiny by the Ministry of Magic, which refuses to officially acknowledge the terrifying truth that Voldemort is back. Enter a particularly loathsome new character: Dolores Umbridge. Life isn't getting any easier for Harry Potter. With an overwhelming course load as the fifth years prepare for their Ordinary Wizarding Levels examinations, devastating changes in the Gryffindor Quidditch team lineup, vivid dreams about long hallways and closed doors, and increasing pain in his lightning-shaped scar, Harry's resilience is sorely tested.

Thoughts:
This use to be my favorite book of the series when I was a teenager and first reading the books. I think most of that was because, as a teenager myself and going through a rough spot, I felt I related to Harry’s anger and angst. Nowadays, the book doesn’t do as much for me. And yet I still think this is one of the better books. I suppose because of everything that is revealed. I believe I said book three of the series was where the story shifted into more maturity. I feel this book is also a turning point, beyond the obvious ‘Voldemort is really back now’. I do think any teenager can relate to the book in some way. It’s got the angst, love crushes, jealously, etc. But adults as I can attest still enjoy the story. This is the point in the series where I reread the previous books multiple times, but not the next two. Book six and seven I’ve only read once each and so I am excited to see what has slipped from my mind or been overshadowed by the movies I have watched since. This is definitely a classic in today’s world and deserves a reread every few decades.

Favorite Line:
“According to Madam Pomfrey, thoughts could leave deeper scars than almost anything else.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

77MickyFine
Jul. 23, 2014, 3:56pm

>76 Kassilem: Half-blood Prince is my favourite so I'm looking forward to your reaction to it as a re-read. :)

78Kassilem
Jul. 25, 2014, 1:34pm

I am looking forward to it as well :) It's already on hold.

79Kassilem
Jul. 25, 2014, 1:50pm



60. The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms - N. K. Jemisin
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 425
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR- Best 21st c. Fantasy)

Summary:
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle.

Thoughts:
I enjoyed the idea of this book – of Gods stuck in mortal bodies. The first person perspective was okay as well, however I sometimes had a hard time following the jumping around. I thought that could have been handled a bit better. But for a debut novel it was pretty good and unique. I am very interested in the next book. It looks as if it is connected but very different. Instead of focusing on the elite, the next book will focus on the poor and a man learning to accept what he finds insignificant. More gods stuck in mortal bodies. The idea intrigues me just as much as with this book. It was certainly not a waste of time to read if you’re a fantasy fan.

Favorite Line:
There is nothing foolish about hope.

80ronincats
Jul. 25, 2014, 3:31pm

I'm way behind the HP reread this year. I read the first two the first two months, and then haven't gotten back to them. But I caught the last film last weekend and may be inspired to get back to them. Truly a classic.

81dk_phoenix
Jul. 26, 2014, 10:09am

Your thoughts on Order of the Phoenix echo mine... it was my favorite of the series in early days, probably for similar reasons, while my younger sister (who wasn't a teenager at the time) preferred a different installment. I've also only read books 6 & 7 once each, and I suspect I missed a lot of nuance because of it. I'm really looking forward to re-reading them (though I'm stuck in book 4 at the moment).

82Kassilem
Jul. 26, 2014, 7:22pm

>80 ronincats:. I have to admit I went and looked at fan-made videos of the fifth movie after finishing the book. It was very well made. All of them are :) I also had a loll myself after reading the second book, I think it was. I tried in the beginning to do one a month but life happens, right. And for me I find it's just better to read whatever is to my fancy at that moment (tied in to what I can get from the library in that moment or what's come in on my holds). I can force myself to read someone on a schedule but I prefer not to, so I gave up on the group read to just read them whenever.

>81 dk_phoenix:. I suspect I missed tons myself. I can't really remember book six as much as I know I should. I think the movies have messed me up on some of the timeline too. I'm hoping to get the audio from the library soon. So one is ahead of me but it shouldn't be long what with the number of copies there are. :)

83Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jul. 29, 2014, 7:41pm



61. The Daylight War - Peter V. Brett
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 704
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
On the night of the new moon, the demons rise in force, seeking the deaths of two men, both of whom have the potential to become the fabled Deliverer, the man prophesied to reunite the scattered remnants of humanity. Arlen Bales was once an ordinary man, but now he has become something more—the Warded Man, tattooed with eldritch wards so powerful they make him a match for any demon. Arlen denies he is the Deliverer at every turn, but the more he tries to be one with the common folk, the more fervently they believe. Ahmann Jardir has forged the warlike desert tribes of Krasia into a demon-killing army and proclaimed himself Shar’Dama Ka. He carries ancient weapons that give credence to his claim, and already vast swaths of the green lands bow to his control. But Jardir did not come to power on his own. His rise was engineered by his First Wife, Inevera. Once Arlen and Jardir were as close as brothers. Now they are the bitterest of rivals. As humanity’s enemies rise, the only two men capable of defeating them are divided against each other by the most deadly demons of all—those lurking in the human heart.

Thoughts:
This book was so close to getting a four star. I enjoyed the story – most of it – and the premise/conflict, but half the book again was flashbacks of some of the characters, particularly those from the Krasia tribe, which had so many similar terms I had trouble sometimes knowing what some of them meant. This messed the flow of the book up for me. I think it would have been much better if the flashbacks had been dealt with in their chronological order and put in the first book. I can imagine the trouble of coming up with something three books into your series and having to twist the story a little to add it in, but in this case, it’s happened too many times to ignore. It happened in the second book and now multiple times in the third book. Either the story wasn’t well planned from the beginning or this is a new way to tell stories – and it’s not one that I prefer. However the writing and overall story is good. I still don’t like Renna and she especially annoyed me in this third book although I can’t say exactly why. But she was the only one I really couldn’t stand. The ending does a very good job of making the readers anticipate the fourth book. I believe this series is planned for five books so we’re more than halfway there. Again, I think Peter Brett is a good writer, but I can’t get passed the way he orders his scenes. Still, I’d recommend giving this series a try if you’re an epic fantasy fan.

Favorite Line:
Sometimes I get so caught up in my own drama, I forget I'm not the only one in the play.

84Kassilem
Jul. 30, 2014, 10:56pm



62. Enders - Lissa Price
Genre: Dystopia, Science Fiction
Pages: 288
Rating: 3 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Someone is after Starters like Callie and Michael—teens with chips in their brains. They want to experiment on anyone left over from Prime Destinations—Starters who can be controlled and manipulated. With the body bank destroyed, Callie no longer has to rent herself out to creepy Enders. But Enders can still get inside her mind and make her do things she doesn't want to do. Like hurt someone she loves. Having the chip removed could save her life—but it could also silence the voice in her head that might belong to her father. Callie has flashes of her ex-renter Helena's memories, too. And the Old Man is back, filling her with fear. Who is real and who is masquerading in a teen body? No one is ever who they appear to be, not even the Old Man. Determined to find out who he really is and grasping at the hope of a normal life for herself and her younger brother, Callie is ready to fight for the truth. Even if it kills her.

Thoughts:
This book didn’t match up with the first book, Starters. It was too predictable, with too many convenient happenings. The emotions didn’t seem real which made the characters seem flat and two dimensional. And I’ve come to the conclusion that I don’t particularly like the books where characters are forced to action against their will, and that was the premise of this whole book. I dealt with it better in the first book, but not as well in this one. I don’t doubt I would do any better truth be told, but I like my characters to fight back. Perhaps the writing just didn’t do it for me. I didn’t invest and so it was frustrating to watch all the elderly take advantage of the teenagers. I’m not explaining it very well. Whatever the reason, I didn’t get much out of this book. I also would have liked to know a lot more about the history behind the story – specifically the spore war. Overall, it was still a page turner, but I don’t think I would recommend it.

Favorite Line:
“Eventually we’ll be old and wrinkled. Like everybody. But we’ll look a lot better if we’re happy inside. If we used our brains and our talents instead of stressing over what someone else defines as ‘pretty.’”

85foggidawn
Jul. 31, 2014, 7:36am

>84 Kassilem: I read Starters back when it was first published, and intended to read Enders when it came out. It's been so long now, though, that I don't have the urge to read it any more, so I'll probably skip it. Thanks for the review!

86Kassilem
Aug. 1, 2014, 1:37am

Probably for the best :)

87Kassilem
Aug. 1, 2014, 1:44am



63. Fifty Shades of Grey - E L James
Genre: Romance
Pages: 514
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
When literature student Anastasia Steele goes to interview young entrepreneur Christian Grey, she encounters a man who is beautiful, brilliant, and intimidating. The unworldly, innocent Ana is startled to realize she wants this man and, despite his enigmatic reserve, finds she is desperate to get close to him. Unable to resist Ana’s quiet beauty, wit, and independent spirit, Grey admits he wants her, too—but on his own terms. Shocked yet thrilled by Grey’s singular erotic tastes, Ana hesitates. For all the trappings of success—his multinational businesses, his vast wealth, his loving family—Grey is a man tormented by demons and consumed by the need to control. When the couple embarks on a daring, passionately physical affair, Ana discovers Christian Grey’s secrets and explores her own dark desires.

Thoughts:
This book was a pleasant surprise. I feel like I’ve heard so much about the book, and most of it not all that good. There are so many reviews out there about the bad writing, that it’s too juvenile, that the story is too weak. Or on the other side, so many people said the book was too grossly erotic. I think this book was pretty good actually, and can’t understand why it got so many negative responses. Actually I can – it’s topic, BSDM, is almost taboo isn’t it? And a lot of people have a hard time accepting what they’ve been told all their life is evil, unmoral, or unnatural. I did not think this book was that erotic. I’ve read much worse myself. I also did not think the book just about sex alone. There was a good story behind the sex. Maybe the writing wasn’t very loquacious but again, I have read so many books that are at this level which received high ratings. Again, I think the problem a lot of people have with the book is the BDSM. It’s not something I think a lot of people really understand. I didn’t see erotica here, I saw romance. I saw two people trying to make two different lifestyles work. I enjoyed the honesty I found in this writing. I have to applaud the author for writing this. Trust me, this could have been much worse. I think the book deserves much more admiration than it’s received. More superficially, the book does end on a semi-cliffhanger. I am eager to get to the next book sometime in the future.

Favorite Line:
“Your stepfather? I'd like to meet him."
Oh no... why?
"I'm not sure that's a good idea."
Christian unlocks the door, his mouth in a grim line.
"Are you ashamed of me?"
"No!" It's my turn to sound exasperated. "Introduce you to my dad as what? 'This is the man who deflowered me and wants to start a BDSM relationship'. You're not wearing running shoes.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

88Kassilem
Aug. 1, 2014, 1:57am

Reading Stats: July

Books: 9
Pages: 4,738

Format:
Dead Tree: 4
Audiobook: 5

Category:
TBR: 5
New: 2
Reread: 2

Stars:
5 Stars: 3
4 Stars: 2
3 Stars: 3
2 Stars: 1

Time Range:
1990-1999: 1
2000-2009: 3
2010-2014: 5

Genres:
Epic Fantasy: 3
High Fantasy: 2
Science Fiction: 2
Urban Fantasy: 1
Romance: 1
Mystery: 1
Dystopia: 1

Graphic Novels read: 4 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

89Kassilem
Aug. 3, 2014, 12:59am



64. The Forever Song - Julie Kagawa
Genre: Gothic Fantasy
Pages: 416
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Allie will embrace her cold vampire side to hunt down and end Sarren, the psychopathic vampire who murdered Zeke. But the trail is bloody and long, and Sarren has left many surprises for Allie and her companions—her creator, Kanin, and her blood brother, Jackal. The trail is leading straight to the one place they must protect at any cost—the last vampire-free zone on Earth, Eden. And Sarren has one final, brutal shock in store for Allie. In a ruined world where no life is sacred and former allies can turn on you in one heartbeat, Allie will face her darkest days. And if she succeeds, triumph is short-lived in the face of surviving forever alone.

Thoughts:
I have enjoyed this series. I saw more flaws in this last book than I remember seeing in the last two books but it could just be a case of reading it after reading certain other books. But I remind myself that this is a series I have been waiting to finish for a while. The series has kept me hooked. So even though this last book was predictable and not as entertaining as the first two, it still gets a four star, albeit a low four star. I enjoyed Jackal’s slow transformation and Karrin’s consistent solidness. Zeke’s and Allison’s romance seemed too two-dimensional, but it was sweet in its own way. I’m not looking to jump straight into Kagawa’s new series coming out this year but I have to say, Kagawa is pounding out the books. Three in a year is impressive. Eventually I might try her new series but there’s no great urge to, which itself says something about this last book. Still, it wasn’t bad. The first book will always be my favorite.

Favorite Line:
“A church,” Jackal said in obvious distaste. “Of course it would be a church. Why am I even surprised? You really don’t get this whole demon thing, do you, sister?”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

90Kassilem
Aug. 3, 2014, 11:22pm



65. Empire of Ivory - Naomi Novik
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 416
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Tragedy has struck His Majesty’s Aerial Corps, whose magnificent fleet of fighting dragons and their human captains valiantly defend England’s shores against the encroaching armies of Napoleon Bonaparte. An epidemic of unknown origin and no known cure is decimating the noble dragons’ ranks–forcing the hopelessly stricken into quarantine. Now only Temeraire and a pack of newly recruited dragons remain uninfected–and stand as the only means of an airborne defense against France’s ever bolder sorties. Bonaparte’s dragons are already harrowing Britain’s ships at sea. Only one recourse remains: Temeraire and his captain, Will Laurence, must take wing to Africa, whose shores may hold the cure to the mysterious and deadly contagion. On this mission there is no time to waste, and no telling what lies in store beyond the horizon or for those left behind to wait, hope, and hold the line.

Thoughts:
I think this might be my favorite book in the series, with perhaps exception for the first book. I loved that they ended up in Africa and saw that there was a whole different world there with a slew of dragons themselves. I felt it broadened the story considerably. The formal language is still a constant although listening to the language instead of reading it in this book’s case was a little interesting at first. It’s not like any of the other books have lacked the quest storyline, but here in particular I appreciated the quest much more than previous books. Perhaps because it was centered on the dragons themselves whom I’ve been missing. The British dragons weren’t in the previous two books at all. Also, Laurence actually meets Bonaparte in this book. This book ends on a semi-cliffhanger, so I am very curious to get my hands on the next one.

91Kassilem
Aug. 3, 2014, 11:41pm

Life Update:
This summer has been much crazier than I thought it would be. Mostly I've been listening to audio books while I run around everywhere and trying to get some hardcopy books in at night while I'm in bed. I've finished a few personal projects I've been meaning to do for months, thankfully, and am still working on my 2014 year goals. I haven't been on LT much expect to post reviews which is a shame - I hope to change this soon. My summer class ends in two weeks and then I get a week break before my last semester of college. Whoohoo! It's gonna be a doozy.

I've also been working on my cross-stitch at night when I find myself at a part in an audio book I just have to get through, and wanted to share the progress since I had started doing this in my first thread:



Also, I finally put in the lines on the other cross-stitch I finished last year. It really did need it. Now that one is totally done!

92Kassilem
Aug. 4, 2014, 1:14am

Speaking of goals!! I just completed number 8 - finished writing my first story, start to end. It took seven long years! And I've got five chapters completed on my next story and load of research so I'd say I've got a good start on that one too. :) Wow. I feel so weird and accomplished!!

1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
5. Get to the gym four times a week
6. Pay off my car
7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

93scaifea
Aug. 4, 2014, 7:06am

Oh, your cross stitch projects are beautiful! Well done!

94ronincats
Aug. 4, 2014, 1:26pm

Congrats on getting so much accomplished!

95lkernagh
Aug. 4, 2014, 5:01pm

Your cross stitch projects are lovely and congratulations on all that you have accomplished so far! I see a check mark beside "Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second". Can one ask the topic/genre of your first novel?

96RosyLibrarian
Aug. 4, 2014, 6:15pm

>87 Kassilem: I think you are the only other person I've seen in this group tackle 50 Shades. I don't think I loved it as much as you, but it did get me to read a little more out of my comfort zone, so that's something. Can't wait to read your thoughts on the next two books. (Are you going to see the movie?)

>92 Kassilem: Congrats on your first novel! We need details!

97Kassilem
Aug. 4, 2014, 7:42pm

>93 scaifea: Thank you Amber!

>94 ronincats: And thank you, Roni, as well :)

>95 lkernagh:. You may certainly ask, Lori. I love to talk about it, as you can see by the many paragraphs beneath :D

I actually started writing a fantasy trilogy years and years ago but got bogged down in its complexity and gave it up. That's when I was introduced to fanfiction writing - writing with characters/worlds based on games, movies, books, etc, which is not publishable. At the time I was in love with the Final Fantasy video game series and I decided I would try to write a story based off of the FF8 game to develop my writing. I thought that if I could get through writing a whole book I could attempt my fantasy trilogy again with more confidence. As if turns out, I really just needed to grow up and mentally develop into an adult, but the exercise was definitely still good for developing my writing skills as I am a much better writer now because of it.

Anyways, I started writing the fanfiction piece about seven years ago and thought I would get back to publishable writing soon, but in the last three years or so, after getting a lot of love and motivation from my online readers, I decided I just had to finish the fanfiction. And then of course I had all these other ideas based in the same world, so I have a few drafts now of fanfiction I'd like to write. It's certainly not what I expected myself to be spending years writing, but it is what it became :)

I am planning on taking the spring of 2015 while I'm out of school to seriously write a book I can send off to a publishing office, but I am going to continue writing fanfiction. I find it is a great way to develop writing skills and a way to get some solid feedback on your compositions.

I'm blabbing :) The story itself in essence is about a man becoming blind due to a freak accident and having to learn how to live with the handicap. Incidentally he's also gay because I was very into that community as well when I began the story, so there is a romance aspect between him and a lover that he ran away from two years earlier who never got over him. The lover helps him rehabilitate and they both give each other another chance. Because it's fanfiction based on the Final Fantasy 8 game there's more to it than that but nothing that would make sense unless you'd played the game.

The story is about 105,000 words with 18 chapters. 158 pages on my computer. The biggest writing project I have ever completed. :)

>96 RosyLibrarian: I doubt that I'll watch the movie for Fifty Shades, at least any time in the near future. I saw a cover with the actor and actress and Christian is very far from what I pictured him looking like and it really threw me off. Sometimes I can get over that, but I'm not sure this time. I'm glad I gave the book a chance though. I'm borrowing them from a friend who's almost finished with the second book. Once she's done it'll swap to my desk and I'm sure I'll get to it soon after that :) As for the book details see my above rant if you haven't already :D

98RosyLibrarian
Aug. 4, 2014, 7:46pm

>97 Kassilem: Awesome sounding book. I love the Final Fantasy series. I played 8, but my favorite of all time is 6.

Yeah...the actor playing Christian is not who I expected either, though I've seen him in other things and found him attractive. He's too... baby face or something for the part though. As for Anastasia, I was more on board after I saw them dye her hair. I'm not sure if I will see it in theaters either. I guess it depends if I can drag a girlfriend along. I kind of doubt my husband would be caught dead. ;)

99lkernagh
Aug. 4, 2014, 8:31pm

I think it is wonderful that you have embraced your writing enthusiasm and have stuck with it! I don't know anything about the Final Fantasy series but I love the premise of your story. Thank you for sharing it with us!

100Kassilem
Aug. 5, 2014, 12:54am

>98 RosyLibrarian: I think my favorite Final Fantasy story is 7, but I haven't actually played 6 yet. I'll have to get onto it sometime. And oh, I can't imagine many husbands would be willing to go see that movie in public :)

>99 lkernagh: Thanks! And you're so very welcome for the share-and-tell. :) Thank you for asking.

101Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 7, 2014, 12:30pm



66. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince - J K Rowling
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 652
Rating: 4 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
The war against Voldemort is not going well; even the Muggles have been affected. Dumbledore is absent from Hogwarts for long stretches of time, and the Order of the Phoenix has already suffered losses. And yet as with all wars, life goes on. Sixth-year students learn to Apparate. Teenagers flirt and fight and fall in love. Harry receives some extraordinary help in Potions from the mysterious Half-Blood Prince. And with Dumbledore's guidance, he seeks out the full, complex story of the boy who became Lord Voldemort -- and thus finds what may be his only vulnerability.

Thoughts:
Hmm. I liked this book less than the last few in the series. I think most of it was because this was the book where Ron and Hermione fought throughout most of the story and Harry decided he was right about his theories and never stopped to even consider any others. I have to remind myself that Harry is a teenager and thus will still act egotistical half the time. This book is also shorter than book five or seven. I did enjoy the pensive scenes, most of which had not been included in the movie. Actually, reading this book made me think that the sixth movie was very well made. This book felt more like a developmental book, kind of like a second book in a trilogy; I felt like the year just flew by and that not much really happened between the beginning and the end of the character’s school year. But still, great story, good writing, good entertainment.

Favorite Line:
“Voldemort himself created his worst enemy, just as tyrants everywhere do! Have you any idea how much tyrants fear the people they oppress? All of them realize that, one day, amongst their many victims, there is sure to be one who rises against them and strikes back!”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

102Kassilem
Aug. 7, 2014, 12:25pm



67. Half a King - Joe Abercrombie
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 352
Rating: 4 Stars
(Early Reviewer)

Summary:
Prince Yarvi has vowed to regain a throne he never wanted. But first he must survive cruelty, chains, and the bitter waters of the Shattered Sea. And he must do it all with only one good hand. Born a weakling in the eyes of his father, Yarvi is alone in a world where a strong arm and a cold heart rule. He cannot grip a shield or swing an axe, so he must sharpen his mind to a deadly edge. Gathering a strange fellowship of the outcast and the lost, he finds they can do more to help him become the man he needs to be than any court of nobles could. But even with loyal friends at his side, Yarvi finds that his path may end as it began—in twists, and traps, and tragedy.

Thoughts:
This is my first Joe Abercrombie book, and it wasn’t bad. I suppose it wasn’t phenomenal like I had half thought due to Abercrombie’s growing fans, but it was a solid fantasy story. Enough to make a good story but not too much to make it complicated. There are some important life lessons here and good twists and turns throughout the book – which makes it sort of a page turner. It can easily be read in one night. It held my attention pretty well but it’s not a trilogy I will be running to get the next book for. I will probably read the next book sometime in the future and I do plan on reading more from Abercrombie but I don’t mind if there’s a lag between now and then. Good, but not phenomenal.

Favorite Line:
“A good enemy keeps you ever sharp.”
“I’m happier blunt,” grunted Jaud.
(Pg. 185-186)

103ronincats
Aug. 8, 2014, 11:47pm

Abercrombie is one I haven't tried yet, although I have heard the reviews.

104dk_phoenix
Aug. 9, 2014, 8:32am

Ugh. Not thrilled to see your disappointment with Enders... Starters was such a surprisingly fantastic read, I've really been looking forward to the next book. Argh!!! Oh well, I'll read it anyway.

105Kassilem
Aug. 11, 2014, 7:54pm

>103 ronincats: I think he's good enough to give a try for sure

>104 dk_phoenix: You never know. You might like it more than I did. I think moods effect how you like a book sometimes. And sometimes when you read it, or why you read it. :) I hope you're not as dissapointed as I was.

106Kassilem
Aug. 11, 2014, 8:15pm



68. Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire - James Lowder
Genre: Reference
Pages: 240
Rating: 5 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
Go beyond the Wall and across the narrow sea with this collection about George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, from A Game of Thrones to A Dance with Dragons. The epic game of thrones chronicled in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. In Beyond the Wall, bestselling authors and acclaimed critics offer up thought-provoking essays and compelling insights: Daniel Abraham reveals the unique challenges of adapting the original books into graphic novels. Westeros.org founders Linda Antonsson and Elio M. García, Jr., explore the series’ complex heroes and villains, and their roots in the Romantic movement. Wild Cards contributor Caroline Spector delves into the books’ controversial depictions of power and gender. Plus much more, from military science fiction writer Myke Cole on the way Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder shapes many of the leading characters to author and television writer Ned Vizzini on the biases against genre fiction that color critical reactions to the series.

Thoughts:
I really liked this book; much more than I imagined myself liking it when I first picked it up. I do love George R. R. Martin’s series, A Song of Fire and Ice, but this book showed me what I was missing by not stepping back and really looking at the series as a literary masterpiece. I knew there was something about the books that made them special and this book helped me define why that was. It also made me aware of the critics that the genre fantasy used to receive and how Martin has helped the genre immensely with his books. There are a lot of very interesting things brought up about the series in this book. Reading this book has made me aware that I need to read a lot more books like this – writers analyzing other literary works. It’s fascinating to think about what is brought up in books like these. It makes reading the actual stories somewhat different. This book does have a lot of spoilers so do not read if you have not read all five books in the series already. Or, in my case, read four of the books and watched all the current TV show episodes. I do recommend this book to any fan of the series.

Favorite Line:
‘One argument against such brutal content, and it’s a compelling one, is that the sexual humiliation of women in A Song of Ice and Fire is just too cavalier, too omnipresent – that it overwhelms other aspects of the books. How would male readers react to an epic story written by a woman where virtually every chapter features a man being violently assaulted?
The counterargument posits that, by presenting all the raping and whoring so casually, Martin is commenting on women and powerlessness, perhaps even making an ironic point: women are the ultimate outsiders. Their complete and vicious degradation is so commonplace that almost no in Westeros notices……
This violence, of course, is true not just in Westeros and Essos: it’s been true for most of real-world human history. Is it any more visible in our history books and museums?’
(Pg 164-165)

107Kassilem
Aug. 12, 2014, 3:31pm



69. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - J K Rowling
Genre: Eoic Fantasy
Pages: 784
Rating: 5 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
The heart of Book 7 is a hero's mission--not just in Harry's quest for the Horcruxes, but in his journey from boy to man--and Harry faces more danger than that found in all six books combined, from the direct threat of the Death Eaters and you-know-who, to the subtle perils of losing faith in himself. Attentive readers would do well to remember Dumbledore's warning about making the choice between "what is right and what is easy," and know that Rowling applies the same difficult principle to the conclusion of her series. While fans will find the answers to hotly speculated questions about Dumbledore, Snape, and you-know-who, it is a testament to Rowling's skill as a storyteller that even the most astute and careful reader will be taken by surprise.

Thoughts:
I think I’m as sad to see this series over as I was when I first read the series years ago. There’s some series I’m sorry to see end because I just love the characters so much that I hate to see them go. In this case, the story was so good that I’m sorry to see the masterpiece end. And yet I think it was ended very well. That was the place to do it. This last book altogether was very good. I don’t know that I can say anything that has not been said about this series. It’s becoming a classic for a reason. I’m glad I took the time to reread the series this year. And I have to say that listening to Jim Dale narrate these audio books has also been a treat. Dale is a very talented narrator. This series is highly recommended.

Favorite Line:
“Cinderella? Snow White? What's that? An illness?”

108Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 14, 2014, 6:22pm



70. Love is the Higher Law - David Levithan
Genre: Historical Fiction
Pages: 176
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
The lives of three teens—Claire, Jasper, and Peter—are altered forever on September 11, 2001. Claire, a high school junior, has to get to her younger brother in his classroom. Jasper, a college sophomore from Brooklyn, wakes to his parents’ frantic calls from Korea, wondering if he’s okay. Peter, a classmate of Claire’s, has to make his way back to school as everything happens around him. Here are three teens whose intertwining lives are reshaped by this catastrophic event. As each gets to know the other, their moments become wound around each other’s in a way that leads to new understandings, new friendships, and new levels of awareness for the world around them and the people close by.

Thoughts:
I was young and living on the other side of the country at the time when 9/11 occurred, so it didn’t really affect me all that much, nor the war that occurred afterwards. I do remember watching a few films dedicated to the event years afterwards, but I can’t say that it was ever a very big part of my life. This is why I think books like this one are important, like David Levithan states himself in the end of the book. It shows those who were too young to understand what really happened that day. All of it – such as the way the air smelled or the way papers from the towers were blown all the way into Brooklyn. It’s those little things that make it real. This was a good, important book. It just didn’t hold me very well. It does make me think I should pick up another book on the topic sometime, one that really goes into detail what happened that day. The writing was good; it’s Levithan so the writing is always good and always holds a lot of meaning. There’s a lot you could grab form the words in this book.

Favorite Line:
‘Because ultimately, isn’t your belief in human nature a perfect reflection of your own nature? If I expected the best from people, wouldn’t I have to expect the best from myself?
(Pg 106)

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

109Kassilem
Aug. 14, 2014, 6:17pm



71. The Rithmatist - Brandon Sanderson
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 384
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
More than anything, Joel wants to be a Rithmatist. Rithmatists have the power to infuse life into two-dimensional figures known as Chalklings. Rithmatists are humanity’s only defense against the Wild Chalklings. Having nearly overrun the territory of Nebrask, the Wild Chalklings now threaten all of the American Isles. As the son of a lowly chalkmaker at Armedius Academy, Joel can only watch as Rithmatist students learn the magical art that he would do anything to practice. Then students start disappearing—kidnapped from their rooms at night, leaving trails of blood. Assigned to help the professor who is investigating the crimes, Joel and his friend Melody find themselves on the trail of an unexpected discovery—one that will change Rithmatics—and their world—forever.

Thoughts:
I don’t think there’s a book of Sanderson’s that I don’t like. I wasn’t sure about this one since I knew it was written with a Young Adult audience in mind but I shouldn’t have worried. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I think the YA audience will appreciate a protagonist their own age and the quirky half-romance that looks like it will form between Melody and Joel, but as an adult I still enjoyed it. As always, Sanderson’s imagination is great. He comes up with unique magical systems all the time. And his writing is always well done as well. His plots are always exciting. All this combined makes for great books. This looks like it will have a sequel at least. I am interested in seeing where Sanderson takes this. There’s been a lot of hints towards Joel’s future. If you’re a fantasy fan, I would recommend this.

Favorite Line:
“The most dangerous kind of man is not the one who spent his youth shoving others around. That kind of man gets lazy, and is often too content with his life to be truly dangerous. The man who spent his youth being shoved around, however … When that man gets a little power and authority, he often uses it to become a tyrant on par with the worst warlords in history.”

110Kassilem
Aug. 15, 2014, 6:19pm



72. Wide Awake - David Levithan
Genre: GLBT, Politics
Pages: 240
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
In the not-too-impossible-to-imagine future, a gay Jewish man has been elected president of the United States. Until the governor of one state decides that some election results in his state are invalid, awarding crucial votes to the other candidate, and his fellow party member. Thus is the inspiration for couple Jimmy and Duncan to lend their support to their candidate by deciding to take part in the rallies and protests. Along the way comes an exploration of their relationship, their politics, and their country, and sometimes, as they learn, it's more about the journey than it is about reaching the destination.

Thoughts:
I'm usually not interested in reading about politics, so this book of Levithan's has sat on my list for a while as I read his other books. Once again I judged a book by it's cover/blurb. It's a trap every reader falls for even when we know better. This is such a book. This is so much more than politics. It's about standing up for what you believe in. And about love. Love is not easy. Standing up for what you believe in is not always easy either. This is not my favorite of Levithan's books, but it's up there above many. I love the message this book is teaching. The writing, as always, is fantastic and the many memorable quotes are very fulfilling. David Levithan is an author I believe everyone should try, no matter your status, sexuality, age, or values. Everyone can learn something from David Levithan's books.

Favorite Line:
“We are not taught "love thy neighbor unless their skin is a different color from yours " or "love thy neighbor unless they don't make money as you do" or "love thy neighbor unless they don't share your belies." We are taught "love thy neighbor". No exceptions. We are all in this together - every single one of us. And the only way we are going to survive as a society is through compassion. A Great Community does not mean we all think the same things or do the same things. It simply means we are willing to work together and are willing to love despite our differences.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

111Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 21, 2014, 2:55pm



73. Requiem - Lauren Oliver
Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopia
Pages: 432
Rating: 2 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Now an active member of the resistance, Lena has transformed. The nascent rebellion that was underway in Pandemonium has ignited into an all-out revolution in Requiem, and Lena is at the center of the fight. After rescuing Julian from a death sentence, Lena and her friends fled to the Wilds. But the Wilds are no longer a safe haven. Pockets of rebellion have opened throughout the country, and the government cannot deny the existence of Invalids. Regulators infiltrate the borderlands to stamp out the rebels. As Lena navigates the increasingly dangerous terrain of the Wilds, her best friend, Hana, lives a safe, loveless life in Portland as the fiancée of the young mayor. Requiem is told from both Lena and Hana's points of view. They live side by side in a world that divides them until, at last, their stories converge.

Thoughts:
The first book, Delirium, was the best in this series. The second book and this book don’t match up with it at all in my opinion. As with the second book, the narrator of this audio book really grated on me. I didn’t like her at all. Sometimes it just takes a little to get used to a narrator but not this time. As for the story: I didn’t like the love triangle. I think it’s used too often in young adult literature to be honest. I felt the ending of this book was cut off. Not necessarily rushed but cut off too soon. I feel like I’ve been left hanging. What happens to Hana? Did Lena really choose Alex or not? What happens now after the walls are torn down? We get nothing. I had hoped that my ambivalence of the second book was just a case of a weak middle trilogy book, but this last book didn’t make me feel any better about the series. I like the idea – that love is a disease and society’s role is to cure it, and it came across great in the first book but I just didn’t feel it for these last two books. Not sure I’d recommend the series as a whole.

Favorite Line:
“And you can't love, not fully, unless you are loved in return.”

112Kassilem
Aug. 19, 2014, 12:49am



74. The Coldest Girl in Coldtown - Holly Black
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 448
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Tana lives in a world where walled cities called Coldtowns exist. In them, quarantined monsters and humans mingle in a decadently bloody mix of predator and prey. And once you pass through Coldtown's gates, you can never leave. One morning, after a perfectly ordinary party, Tana wakes up surrounded by corpses. The only other survivors of this massacre are her exasperatingly endearing ex-boyfriend, infected and on the edge, and a mysterious boy burdened with a terrible secret. Shaken and determined, Tana enters a race against the clock to save the three of them the only way she knows how: by going straight to the wicked, opulent heart of Coldtown itself.

Thoughts:
Wow. This is one of those books were you decide to read it because you picked it up on a hunch or someone else liked it but you're not sure yourself how you'll react, and then it turns out to be a very awesome book. For some reason I thought this was about zombies. I saw it on LT a while back and put it on the TBR list and when the library had a copy I grabbed it. Turns out it's about vampires. Vampires have gotten a lot of press in literature in the last few decades and some are a lot better than others. This is one of the better ones. Due, I think, by very good writing and storytelling. Tana is a very likable heroine; I feel very invested in her now. I also found it very interesting the world Black has created, full of young people jumping on the new bandwagon like they always do - except this time it's for immortality. The sad truth is that I can picture this happening very easily. I could hardly put this book down. Even with vampires present the book has a very realistic aura about it. This is my first Holly Black story but I've heard since reading this that she has many other great books as well. I'm sure I will be reading more from her from now on.

Favorite Line:
Even from the beginning, that was the problem. People liked pretty things. People even liked pretty things that wanted to kill and eat them.

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

113Kassilem
Aug. 19, 2014, 11:38pm



75. Severed Souls - Terry Goodkind
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 560
Rating: 2 Stars
(New)

Summary:
From the far reaches of the D'Haran Empire, Bishop Hannis Arc and the ancient Emperor Sulachan lead a vast horde of Shun-Tuk and other depraved "half-people" into the Empire's heart, raising an army of the dead in order to threaten the world of the living. Meanwhile, far from home, Richard Rahl and Kahlan Amnell must defend themselves and their followers from a series of terrifying threats, despite a magical sickness that depletes their strength and which, if not cured, will take their lives...sooner rather than later.

Thoughts:
What the hell. I went into this book thinking it was the last book to a very long series, but after finishing that ending, I had better be dead wrong; otherwise I might have to throw a legitimate tantrum. The book itself… damn, this is not the Goodkind I have come to expect. I thought it was going downhill with the last two books but I was so hoping this one would be different. It wasn’t. If anything it might have been worse. I can’t believe I’m saying this about The Sword of Truth series, but I don’t know that I even like this book, which is devastating because I absolutely LOVED Goodkind’s first 11 books. One problem: character deaths – these were handled way wrong, too quick and sudden and emotionally over too fast. Second problem: Goodkind’s writing. If may just be me – probably not – but half this book felt like a repeat. Not even of the previous book but of itself. Pages were taken up with dialogue of characters repeating themselves over and over and OVER again. Even with the same exact phrases. They kept thinking the same things over and over. Even the grammar was off, describing a thing the same way with different words, and in the same sentence. Third problem: how the heck did Richard not see the betrayal. Richard is KNOWN for his great intellect and observation. He’s not invincible but the past books have proven that he is smart. He did not act smart in this book. Fourth problem: both Zedd AND Kahlan telling Richard to just give up. I can get one of them doing it, but not both, and not those characters. It just goes on and on, the problems with this book. If there is another book, and there better well be, I will be reading it. But I don’t know if I can take much more disappointment. I don’t know what happened to Terry Goodkind, but this is not the writer I came to love.

Favorite Line:
‘There have always been those who hate, and there always will be.’
(Pg 306)

114Kassilem
Aug. 19, 2014, 11:42pm

And with that, another goal is done; number 9

1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
5. Get to the gym four times a week
6. Pay off my car
7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
✔ 9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

115foggidawn
Aug. 20, 2014, 7:44am

Congrats on reaching 75 -- too bad it wasn't with a more enjoyable book.

116RosyLibrarian
Aug. 20, 2014, 8:30am

Congratulations on hitting 75!

117drneutron
Aug. 20, 2014, 9:26am

Congrats!

118scaifea
Aug. 20, 2014, 12:52pm

WooHoo for 75!!

119ronincats
Aug. 20, 2014, 1:15pm

Congratulations on reaching the 75 book mark!

120DeltaQueen50
Aug. 20, 2014, 4:43pm

Hi Melissa, somehow the star on your thread disappeared and I had lost track of you. I have now reapplied the star and have caught up. Congratulations on reaching the 75 mark!

121Kassilem
Aug. 20, 2014, 11:15pm

Thanks everyone!

122Kassilem
Aug. 21, 2014, 2:54pm



76. Naomi and Ely's No Kiss List - Rachel Cohn & David Levithan
Genre: Romance
Pages: 256
Rating: 2 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Naomi and Ely are best friends. Naomi loves and is in love with Ely, and Ely loves Naomi, but prefers to be in love with boys. So they create their "No Kiss List" of people neither of them is allowed to kiss. And this works fine - until Bruce. Bruce is Naomi's boyfriend, so there's no reason to put him on the List. But Ely kissed Bruce even though he is boring. The result: a rift of universal proportions and the potential end of "Naomi and Ely: the institution." Can these best friends come back together again?

Thoughts:
If I wasn’t working my way through all of David Levithan’s book’s I probably wouldn’t have read this. I read the other two books he co-wrote with Rachel Cohn and I didn’t like those one, so I doubted I would like this one either. It’s a bad way to start a book. But I was right – I didn’t like this book any more than the other two. I do like David Levithan’s writing. I’m not positive how the two co-write their books but I’ve always assumed that he wrote the male perspectives and she wrote the female perspectives. I usually like the male perspectives and not the female perspectives so that made sense. In this book, I really didn’t like Naomi. Like, really didn’t like. But what was surprising was that I didn’t like Ely all that much either. Good thing it was so short a book. Check it off the list and move on to other better books.

Favorite Line:
“It's bullshit to think of friendship and romance as being different. They're not. They're just variations of the same love. Variations of the same desire to be close.”

123Kassilem
Aug. 21, 2014, 4:55pm



77. Marly's Ghost - David Levithan
Genre: Gothic Fiction
Pages: 208
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
When Ben's girlfriend, Marly, dies, he feels his life is over. What could possibly matter now when Marly is gone? So when Valentine's Day approaches, it makes sense that this day that was once so meaningful to Ben leaves him feeling bitter and hollow. But then Marly shows up--or at least her ghost does--along with three others spirits. Now Ben must take a painful journey through Valentine's Days past, present, and future, and what he discovers will change him forever.

Thoughts:
This is a Valentines related Christmas Carol. It was cute, and very well written. I’m not really that much of a fan for Valentine’s Day but this book does a good job of expressing what the day is really about and what it’s not about. This is about death and living. This is about love and hate. This is about happiness and despair. It’s a short book, and it’s not quite what I was expecting, but it’s not bad. Not my favorite Levithan book, but better than some.

Favorite Line:
‘So I sat, and I waited, and I was destroyed.’
(Pg 1)

124lkernagh
Aug. 22, 2014, 1:44am

Congratulations on blowing past 75!

125Kassilem
Aug. 23, 2014, 12:58am

Thanks Lori :)

126Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 23, 2014, 1:13am



78. World War Z - Max Brooks
Genre: Science Fiction
Pages: 342
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and inhospitable areas of the planet. He recorded the testimony of men, women, and sometimes children who came face-to-face with the living, or at least the undead, hell of that dreadful time. World War Z is the result. Never before have we had access to a document that so powerfully conveys the depth of fear and horror, and also the ineradicable spirit of resistance, that gripped human society through the plague years.

Thoughts:
This is an interesting and thoughtful book. I don’t think I’ve read a book where the story is told through a series of characters telling a narrator what it was like to live through something. I think perhaps a different format to the story would have held my attention more, but I do have to give props for trying it. I like that you can find all kinds of writing and books. Still, it didn’t feel like a story to get invested in. I suppose I wanted more accounts of civilians, but instead received more of the leaders and soldier’s perspectives. It wasn’t bad but it gave the book a different feel – more a feel of the world fighting against a national threat rather than an emotional tragedy of common people watching their world be destroyed. If you’re a big zombie or war fan, I’d probably recommend it but if not then probably not highly.

Favorite Line:
“The only rule that ever made sense to me I learned from a history, not an economics, professor at Wharton. "Fear," he used to say, "fear is the most valuable commodity in the universe." That blew me away. "Turn on the TV," he'd say. "What are you seeing? People selling their products? No. People selling the fear of you having to live without their products." Fuckin' A, was he right. Fear of aging, fear of loneliness, fear of poverty, fear of failure. Fear is the most basic emotion we have. Fear is primal. Fear sells.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

127Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 25, 2014, 1:26am



79. Fool's Assassin - Robin Hobb
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 667
Rating: 5 Stars
(New)

Summary:
FitzChivalry—royal bastard and former king’s assassin—has left his life of intrigue behind. As far as the rest of the world knows, FitzChivalry Farseer is dead and buried. Masquerading as Tom Badgerlock, Fitz is now married to his childhood sweetheart, Molly, and leading the quiet life of a country squire. Though Fitz is haunted by the disappearance of the Fool, who did so much to shape Fitz into the man he has become, such private hurts are put aside in the business of daily life, at least until the appearance of menacing, pale-skinned strangers casts a sinister shadow over Fitz’s past and his future. Now, to protect his new life, the former assassin must once again take up his old one.

Thoughts:
I had forgotten what Robin Hobb's books can do to me, especially those about ones about Fitz - tear my heart open in grief. There are not a lot of books that so drain me to read them, but this is one. I feel like I should be curled in a ball of misery, or crying, or something. Most of the book actually isn’t depressing at all. It is a charming life story of Fitz trying to be a good father. There’s not that much action; it’s much more about the development of the characters. You watch Fitz and Bee grow and learn and love and it’s very sweet. That only makes the ending of the book all that more heart-rending. The next two books are bound to be much darker than this one. And yet I love the book as much as I loved Hobb’s first two series about Fitz. I can’t get enough of Fitz. I was surprised that the book included Bee’s perspective when before it had only ever been Fitz’s role. But I know why it was done and since Bee is a part of Fitz, she quickly grew on me. I am so happy that Fitz’s story is continuing even if I can see that it may be the most depressing part of his life to come. I’m ecstatic and nervous and terrified and happy and who knows what else.

Favorite Line:
‘And indeed, there she was. I was almost annoyed at her for spoiling my perfectly good sulk. And that was when I realized what I had been doing. I’d been sulking because the Fool had sent letters to Jofron and not to me.’

128PiyushC
Aug. 24, 2014, 3:19pm

>109 Kassilem: Glad to see you liked The Rithmatist too. I am yet to find a Sanderson I didn't like either, and that includes the Alcatraz series, which was a hoot!

>127 Kassilem: The Fitzchivalry series is quite something, isn't it?

129Kassilem
Aug. 25, 2014, 1:26am

>128 PiyushC: :) I'm still making my wat through the Alcatraz series but I have to agree, I haven't found one Sanderson book that I disliked. And the Fitz seires really is amazing. I just love it. :)

130Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 25, 2014, 1:28am



80. Animal Farm - George Orwell
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 124
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
As ferociously fresh as it was more than a half century ago, this remarkable allegory of a downtrodden society of overworked, mistreated animals and their quest to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality is one of the most scathing satires ever published. As readers witness the rise and bloody fall of the revolutionary animals, they begin to recognize the seeds of totalitarianism in the most idealistic organization—and in the most charismatic leaders, the souls of the cruelest oppressors.

Thoughts:
This was actually a depressing novel. It seems a little extravagant, but I have to remind myself that the book was written just after the Second World War ended and that really puts it into perspective. For me, the book is about the way power corrupts and how power and propaganda can be used to lead citizens into actions they would not have volunteered for under normal circumstances, basically brainwashing for an intended effect. This has been seen in history over and over again. The problem really, is education. Not enough people are educated or educated well. And another problem is that many people define equality differently. It’s an interesting book. And also very very popular. In that regard, I am glad I finally got to reading it.

Favorite Line:
“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

“Several of them would have protested if they could have found the right arguments.”

131Kassilem
Aug. 27, 2014, 1:07am



81. Coraline - Neil Gaiman
Genre: Gothic Fantasy
Pages: 208
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR - Best 21st c. Fantasy)

Summary:
When Coraline steps through a door to find another house strangely similar to her own (only better), things seem marvelous. But there's another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go. Coraline will have to fight with all her wit and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.

Thoughts:
This was a weird little book. I can do weird, being a fantasy fan and all but this one is one that didn't make it in my awesome or wonderful weird. Perhaps it was too juvenile – meant for a much younger audience than me – for me to make it into either of those categories. It is a very quick read however and it’s a fantasy classic. I think they even made a movie based off it. It was one of those books that I’m glad I can check off the list and now know the story that is referenced in many contexts, but I doubt I will ever pick up again or reread.

Favorite Line:
“Mirrors,' she said, 'are never to be trusted.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

132Kassilem
Aug. 30, 2014, 8:18pm



82. Steelheart - Brandon Sanderson
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 400
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
How far would you go for revenge if someone killed your father? If someone destroyed your city? If everything you ever loved was taken from you? David Charleston will go to any lengths to stop Steelheart. But to exact revenge in Steelheart’s world, David will need the Reckoners—a shadowy group of rebels bent on maintaining justice. And it turns out that the Reckoners might just need David too.

Thoughts:
I wasn’t sure I would like this book as much as I usually like Sanderson’s books at first. I didn’t like the interaction between David and Megan. But then, halfway through the book got better or I got used to it - one of the two or both. But Sanderson has done it again, created a system to base a story on that I have never seen before. I don’t know how he does it. But he’s hooked me on this new series with some healthy anticipation for the next book that comes out in January. There are some good twists, great action, and likable characters. It’s a little more slap … stick humor? ... than any of his other books but it works. Plus it’s for a young adult audience so I suppose I should have expected a difference. Slowly, I’m catching up completing Sanderson’s bibliography. If you’re a Sanderson fan or a urban fantasy fan I would recommend this book.

Favorite Line:
“Sometimes, son," my father said, prying my fingers free, "you have to help the heroes along.”

133Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 31, 2014, 4:41pm



83. How They Met and Other Stories – David Levithan
Genre: Romance, GLBT
Pages: 244
Rating: 5 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Here are 18 stories, all about love, all kinds of love. From the aching for the one you pine for, to standing up and speaking up for the one you love, to pure joy and happiness, these love stories run the gamut of that emotion that at some point has turned every one of us inside out and upside down. What is love? With this original story collection, David Levithan proves that love is a many splendored thing, a varied, complicated, addictive, wonderful thing.

Thoughts:
I love most of Levithan’s books. This is one of those books. This is a collection of short stories he wrote for his friends for many many valentine days. I didn’t like all the stories in this collection but I loved many. It really does show that love comes in all kinds of forms. I’m not just talking about love being between men and men as well as men and women and women and women. It’s even more than that. There’s the passionate raw kind of love, there’s the easy laid back love, love that’s lasted years and years, love that last for hours, love that hurts, love that isn’t directed at a person but an idea, love that is hard, love that is sweet, etc. There’s a lot here and all of it true. I highly recommend the book to every and anyone if they are willing to give it a try.

Favorite Line:
“It's like you're a character in this book that everyone around you is writing, and suddenly you have to say, 'I'm sorry, but this role isn't right for me'. And you have to start writing your own life and doing your own thing.”

*This is a BINGO Book. Refer to Post 4*

134PiyushC
Bearbeitet: Aug. 31, 2014, 11:38am

>132 Kassilem: Steelheart is one of the few Sandersons I am yet to read (the other unread ones are all novellas I think), squirrelling them away for a rainy day.

135Kassilem
Aug. 31, 2014, 4:18pm

I've still got Elantris, Mitosis, the last three of his Alcatraz series and a few of his novellas left. :) Slowly I'm working my way through. Or I suppose not so slowly. :D

136Kassilem
Aug. 31, 2014, 4:41pm

Reading Stats: August

Books: 20
Pages: 7,549

Format:
Dead Tree: 10
Audiobook: 10

Category:
TBR: 13
New: 3
Reread: 2
Walk By-Pick Up: 1
Early Reviewer: 1

Stars:
5 Stars: 4
4 Stars: 8
3 Stars: 5
2 Stars: 3

Time Range:
1940-1949: 1
2000-2009: 10
2010-2014: 9

Genres:
Epic Fantasy: 4
High Fantasy: 3
Science Fiction: 2
Urban Fantasy: 2
Gothic Fantasy: 2
Romance: 2
GLBT: 2
Historical Fiction: 1
Lit Classics: 1
Gothic Fiction: 1
Reference: 1
Politics: 1
Dystopia: 1

Graphic Novels read: 3 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

137Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Aug. 31, 2014, 4:59pm

Life Update:

School has started for me. I'm kind of glad, summer was a little crazy in an unpredictable way. It's my last semester and I am so excited to graduate in December! :) I've just received confirmation on my two tutoring positions as well as being hired to be a lab instructor. I've got a fair amount of credits (17) but it's actually much better than my last two semesters where I did 21. I am looking forward to having more free time this school semester as I am not a club president or student representative anymore either.

The cross-stitch is almost done so I am going to have to look at getting another one soon. There is one of two threads I will have to get more of to finish it but I should be uploading it soon. I'm working hard on my writing as well and hope to find a consistency to it every month.

As for the reading, I seem to have collected a bunch from the library in the past month that I will need to get to soon:

On Deck:
Dangerous Women - George R R Martin
Harry Potter's Bookshelf - John Granger
Dreamsongs - George R R Martin
Victory of Eagles - Naomi Novik
The Night Season - Chelsea Cain
Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan - Robin Maxwell
Hate List - Jennifer Brown
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman

On Itunes Deck:
Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Divergent - Veronica Roth
Shadow and Bone - Leigh Bardugo
Raven Boys - Maggie Stiefvater
A Storm of Swords - George R R Martin

138DeltaQueen50
Sept. 1, 2014, 1:53pm

Even though it's time to buckle down and get back to the school work at least you can really see the end in sight, Melissa! You have a great list of books planned for September, I loved The Graveyard Book and Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan. Looking forward to hearing about many of the others you have planned.

139Kassilem
Sept. 1, 2014, 11:46pm

:) Thanks Judy. I too am looking forward to most of these books.

140Kassilem
Sept. 2, 2014, 12:06am



84. Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte
Genre: Lit Classics
Pages: 256
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR - BBC List)

Summary:
The turbulent and tempestuous love story of Cathy and Heathcliff spans two generations — from the time Heathcliff, a strange, coarse young boy, is brought to live on the Earnshaws' windswept estate, through Cathy's marriage to Edgar Linton and Heathcliff's plans for revenge, to Cathy's death years later and the eventual union of the surviving Earnshaw and Linton heirs. A masterpiece of imaginative fiction, Wuthering Heights (the author's only novel) remains as poignant and compelling today as it was when first published in 1847.

Thoughts:
Apparently Wuthering Heights was initially thought to be such a publishing risk that Emily Brontë was asked to pay some of the publication costs. I can understand why I think. With the exception of Nelly, these characters are not very likable. I was surprised at how I could despise Cathy or Catherine at times and then feel sympathy a minute later. I did not like how spoiled the women were in this book but that is more a topic on how they are raised. I did not like Heathcliff’s demeanor. He is not the ‘bad boy’ that is misunderstood and can change if only loved. I did not like the manipulation that all the characters played against one another. And yet I did end up liking the book. I believe this is because of its audacity at what story it tells. This is not a romance story, this is a story full of pride and hate and resentment and vengefulness. It portrays the darker side of humanity, and also our fragility. I’m still taking this book in, as it is a sort of shock to the system. I certainly did not expect it.

141Kassilem
Sept. 11, 2014, 6:20pm



85. Shadow and Bone - Leigh Bardugo
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 416
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Surrounded by enemies, the once-great nation of Ravka has been torn in two by the Shadow Fold, a swath of near impenetrable darkness crawling with monsters who feast on human flesh. Now its fate may rest on the shoulders of one lonely refugee. Alina Starkov has never been good at anything. But when her regiment is attacked on the Fold and her best friend is brutally injured, Alina reveals a dormant power that saves his life—a power that could be the key to setting her war-ravaged country free. Wrenched from everything she knows, Alina is whisked away to the royal court to be trained as a member of the Grisha, the magical elite led by the mysterious Darkling. Yet nothing in this lavish world is what it seems. With darkness looming and an entire kingdom depending on her untamed power, Alina will have to confront the secrets of the Grisha and the secrets of her heart.

Thoughts:
This was a book that I found on a list of recommended YA books to read for fans of George R. R. Martin while they waited for A Dance with Dragons to be published. I remember looking at the summary and thinking I might like it. I did end up liking it. The book has an interesting magic system and because Alina is an orphan she immediately gets character points for gaining reader investment. Everyone always likes the underdog. I thought Alina was a strong person, which is something I like in my characters. There were times in the book too where I thought it might diverge into things like predictable twists or love-triangles but it did a fairly good job of staying away which was another reason I liked the book. I will be reading the next book in the series and the one after that most likely. Bardugo might be an author to watch in the future.

142DeltaQueen50
Sept. 11, 2014, 7:14pm

I've had Shadow and Bone on my wishlist for quite some time, one of these days I'll actually get to it!

143RosyLibrarian
Sept. 12, 2014, 1:33pm

>141 Kassilem: I really, really liked that series. Read the rest. You won't be sorry.

144Kassilem
Sept. 13, 2014, 6:26pm

>142 DeltaQueen50: It's worth it. :)

>143 RosyLibrarian:. :) I am looking forward to it, definetly. I want to know what happens to Alina and Mal

145Kassilem
Sept. 13, 2014, 6:41pm



86. Harry Potter's Bookshelf: The Great Books Behind the Hogwart's Adventures - John Grangr
Genre: Reference
Pages: 303
Rating: 3 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
Harry Potter's Bookshelf: The Great Books Behind the Hogwarts Adventures explores the literary landscape of themes and genres J.K. Rowling artfully wove throughout her novels-and the influential authors and stories that inspired her. From Jane Austen's Emma and Charles Dickens's class struggles, through the gothic romances of Dracula and Frankenstein and the detective mysteries of Dorothy L. Sayers, to the dramatic alchemy of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and William Shakespeare, Rowling cast a powerful spell with the great books of English literature that transformed the story of a young wizard into a worldwide pop culture phenomenon.

Thoughts:
This book wasn’t quite what I was looking for when I picked it up. I suppose after reading Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire by James Lowder I was interested in books that really delve into other books I like, and examine them. This book did that but the way it did it never really grabbed my attention. I thought a lot of what I read was kind of obvious and the rest of it was kind of out there. I’m looking to read a book and pick it apart by looking at symbols and hidden meanings. What I got out of Beyond the Wall was more to the story and an deeper understanding of the characters and plot, connections I hadn’t made while reading the book. What I got in this book was more about other books then Harry Potter. I actually enjoyed reading about the other books, but not much about the rest of the book. It was a struggle especially to read the last half of the book. I do have to say however that I had no idea the Harry Potter series took so long to plan and that it had so much hidden meaning in it. I never ever saw the Christian parallels, which was heavily talked about in this book. Perhaps because I am not a Christian. Either way, even if I was, I don’t want to read a book and, as I said before, pick it apart. I would rather just enjoy the story. I suppose that was the difference. Beyond the Wall allowed me to enjoy the Song of Fire and Ice more, while this Harry Potter book did nothing of the sort. It’s too bad. It just didn’t do anything for me. However the reviews are good and a lot of other people liked the book, so if you are a hardcore Harry Potter fan I think I would recommend this book.

146Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Sept. 21, 2014, 9:54pm



87. Dangerous Women - "Some Desperado" - Joe Abercrombie
Genre: Anthology - Urban Fantasy
Pages: 17
Rating: 3 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
As the sizzlingly fast-paced and action-packed story demonstrates, sometimes chasing a fugitive can be as dangerous for the pursuers as for the pursued - particularly when the quarry has no place left to run.

Thoughts:
I wasn't sure what to do with the short stories I read. I've been reading a few in this Dangerous Women book but it's a huge book as as soon as school started I knew there was no way I was going to be able to read all 900 pages. So I've only read a few of the stories in here. However I would like to keep track of the stories I do read so I decided to do it this way. This "Some Desperado" was the first story in the book, which is why I read it. I've only read one other book by Abercrombie but he has a few other books I'd like to get to. Having said that this short story didn't really interest me all that much. It wasn't boring but I didn't invest in it. Perhaps it's just a lot harder to do so with a story so short. I still think Abercromie is only a mediocre writer at this point but I'll give him a few more chances before I make a final decision on how I like his books.

147Kassilem
Sept. 21, 2014, 9:59pm



88. Dangerous Women - "My Heart Is Either Broken" – Meg Abbott
Genre: Anthology – Mystery
Pages: 22
Rating: 4 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
Meg Abbott shows us that there are some things that you just can’t get over, no matter how hard you try – and some insights into the hearts of even those we love the most that you can’t unsee once you see them.

Thoughts:
"My Heart Is Either Broken" was kind fascinating in a horrible way. I have never read anything by Abbott but if all her writing is like this, I think I might enjoy more of her work. It was almost a thriller and less a mystery, which I liked. Every page was a page turner once you figured out what was going on.

148Kassilem
Sept. 21, 2014, 10:56pm



89. Dangerous Women - "Bombshells" – Jim Butcher
Genre: Anthology – Urban Fantasy
Pages: 47
Rating: 4 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
Butcher flabbergasted everyone by killing Harry Dresden off at the end of Changes (The next novel, Ghost Story, was told from the point of view of Harry’s Ghost!) Here, Harry’s young protégé, trying to carry on the fight against the forces of darkness without Harry, finds that she has some very big shoes to fill, and that she better fill them fast – or die.

Thoughts:
“Bombshells” was interesting. I like anything Jim Butcher, so I was not surprised that I liked this story. It was interesting to see a story from Molly’s point of view since the Dresden Files are all from Harry’s perspective. I enjoyed reading her thoughts and perceptions on Harry, and how powerful everyone thinks he is when he doesn’t think the same thing. I’d be interested in reading more short stories from Butcher… mostly because I’m all caught up on his novels and am waiting hungrily for his newest Dresden book to come out.

149lkernagh
Sept. 22, 2014, 12:37pm

I keep eying the Dangerous Women anthology every time I surf my local library's electronic books section. They have the audiobook and it always seems to be 'available' but 900 pages seems like it would be better dipping in and out of it over a longer period of time.

150Kassilem
Sept. 22, 2014, 2:47pm

Yes. Definetly. I'm not sure what I was thinking when I thought I could read it all the week before my semester started. :)

151DeltaQueen50
Sept. 22, 2014, 5:37pm

I am a fan of Megan Abbott. She wrote a few noir crime books like Queenpin and The Song Is You and has now branched out with some more modern offerings like Dare Me and The Fever. So far I've only read a couple of her noir crime books but hope to read more of her soon.

152drachenbraut23
Sept. 22, 2014, 5:54pm

Hello Melissa,
after a very long absence due to illness I just started lurking again for some time. However, as I enjoy your reviews, I felt I would like to reply to some of them. I still don't read as much as I used to, but I am definitely improving. I am impressed, I read at the top of your thread that you are off with the Peace Corps next year. Any idea already where you are heading?

1. I loved "Words of Radiance" by Brandon Sanderson and just like him for exact the same reasons as you describe him. Even so that it is a "very" long book, somehow it didn't feel as long and I just can't wait for the next one to come out. I also read "Steelheart" which took me a little while to get into, but then I just couldn't put it down anymore.

2. "Murder of Crows" took me also a little while to get in, but in the end I actually liked it more than the first one.

3. I think I liked "The City&The City" by China Mieville more than you did. Although, I found the concept of two overlapping cities at the beginning very confusing as well. However, my favourite book by Mieville still remains to be "Embassytown". I just finished in August the second book of his Bas-Lag series "The Scar" which was definitely a good read, but somehow I didn't enjoy it as much as "Perdido Street Station" which I thought was great.

4. I don't think I need to comment in any way on George RR Martin nor on Harry Potter, both are also great faves of mine. And I just hope we don't need to wait AGAIN another 7?8? years for the next George Martin to come out, otherwise I might feel obliged to visit him and ..............

5. "The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms" a trilogy I quite enjoyed.

6. "The Daylight War" wasn't a bad book, but somehow I was a bit dissapointed. As you said yourself, again this book had a lot of flash back stories, quite a bit of repetition with references to the previous books. However, I still think it is a good, solid series and I will look out for the last one.

7. I had read "Delirium" which I thought was absolutely great, I didn't like Pandemonium and after that couldn't be bothered reading the third installment.

8. "Shadow and Bone" has been on my TBR for some time, so maybe it's about time to push it up a notch.

I finally managed to read this year the "Uglies" series by Scott Westerfeld you recommended last Year? or maybe even the year before. I can't remember. I read the first three and quite enjoyed them, started the fourth, but for some reason couldn't get into it and abandoned it.

Here are some of my fave books of this year:
1. Daughter of Smoke and Bone - Laini Taylor
2. Days of Blood and Starlight - Laini Taylor
3. Dreams of Gods and Monsters - Laini Taylor

All three of them more less a mix of Urban Fantasy and High Fantasy and very good reads.

4. Quartet in Autumn - Barbara Pym
5. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle - Haruki Murakami
6. Of Human Bonadage - Somerset Maugham
7. The Painted Veil - Somerset Maugham

Well, there are quite a few more I enjoyed, but I thought these might well could interest you.

Well, what else to say I admire your cross stitch. Well done, as this requires a lot of patience.

153Kassilem
Sept. 26, 2014, 7:57pm

>151 DeltaQueen50: I hope to read some more as well. :)

>152 drachenbraut23: It's great to have you back Bianca. I'm sorry about the illness. :( I'm glad things are going better for you.

As for the Peace Corps, if everything goes as it should I am scheduled to teach Biology in Ghana, Africa starting June 2015. :) I'm very excited to do something different with my life and that will be very very different.

That's great that we both enjoyed all those books similarly. The Scar is the other book by Mieville that I have planned to read so I'm glad that you enjoyed it. I agree that Words of Radiance didn't seem very long but I listened to it which cross-stitching and I think I just flew through it this summer. Good thing it was this summer when I wasn't doing much :). I really really hope we don't have to wait that long for Martin's next book. I might cry if we do. Although he's got the TV show riding behind him now so maybe that will be more incentive. I'm really looking forward to the second book in the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms series and while I has some problems with The Daylight War I did end up liking the story itself. I am interested in seeing what happens next. I think the fourth book of the Uglies series I didn't enjoy that much as well.

Thank you for the recommendations! I will have to go through those and bookmark their Amazon pages so I remember to add them to my TBR. :)

And thank you for your comment on the Cross-stitch as well. For me, I only need the patience when I mess up and have to pull some thread out painstakingly to re-do sections. Other than that I enjoy the excuse to turn my audio book on.

I hope life is treating you well, or at least better than it has.

154Kassilem
Sept. 26, 2014, 8:17pm



90. Divergent - Veronica Roth
Genre: Dystopia
Pages: 487
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
One choice can transform you. Beatrice Prior's society is divided into five factions—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). Beatrice must choose between staying with her Abnegation family and transferring factions. Her choice will shock her community and herself. But the newly christened Tris also has a secret, one she's determined to keep hidden, because in this world, what makes you different makes you dangerous.

Thoughts:
Well I decided I needed to read this book and see what the hype was about. Perhaps I might have liked it more if I’d read it before all the hype and the new movie. I don’t know. I do know that at this time and place I found the book to be too formulaic as a dystopia book. I’ve read a fair amount of dystopia and this one does not stand out from the crowd like I thought it might. I might have had too high expectations for it. I might just be tired of dystopia. I might have not enjoyed the audio narrator as much as if I had physically read the book. But I am not really that interested in reading the rest of the series which for me is the point. It’s definitely an interesting idea. It’s not a bad book. Just not my cup of tea for the time being.

Favorite Line:
“I have a theory that selflessness and bravery aren't all that different.”

155Kassilem
Sept. 28, 2014, 3:36pm



91. Harry Potter Page to Screen - Bob McCabe
Genre: Reference
Pages: 540
Rating: 5 Stars
(Walk By-Pick Up)

Summary:
Harry Potter: Page to Screen, the follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Harry Potter: Film Wizardry, is a lavish and personal look at the entire filmmaking process that transformed J. K. Rowling’s fantasy series into a blockbuster movie franchise. Featuring all-new interviews with Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Michael Gambon, behind-the-scenes anecdotes from producer David Heyman, production designer Stuart Craig, and director David Yates, and hundreds of never-before-seen photographs and concept illustrations, this book is the ultimate compendium for Potter fans young and old.

Thoughts:
This was a fun book. I have learned so much about filmmaking and Harry Potter itself by reading this book. There were things about the movies that pertained to the books that I never picked up on. And the detail that goes into making a scene let alone a full movie is astounding. I never even noticed all the background stuff when watching the Potter movies but I sure will now. I suppose without all that in the background I would have noticed something was off when watching the films but actually realizing all that is in the background and how much work went into making it all really opened my eyes. I’m really glad I got through this book, it’s a treat. And I loved all the pictures provided. I highly recommend this oversized and clunky book full of fun to any Harry Potter fan.

156Kassilem
Okt. 1, 2014, 11:41pm



92. Hate List - Jennifer Brown
Genre: Gothic Fiction
Pages: 432
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Five months ago, Valerie Leftman's boyfriend, Nick, opened fire on their school cafeteria. Shot trying to stop him, Valerie inadvertently saved the life of a classmate, but was implicated in the shootings because of the list she helped create. A list of people and things she and Nick hated. The list he used to pick his targets. Now, after a summer of seclusion, Val is forced to confront her guilt as she returns to school to complete her senior year. Haunted by the memory of the boyfriend she still loves and navigating rocky relationships with her family, former friends and the girl whose life she saved, Val must come to grips with the tragedy that took place and her role in it, in order to make amends and move on with her life.

Thoughts:
This was a sad book. Bullying always bothers me, especially the bullying found in public schools with kids and teenagers. People can be very cruel, and I suppose I feel it’s worse when kids do it because they don’t even realize the trauma they are putting another person through. That’s not quite it because a lot of adults do the same thing, but I’m not sure how to put in other words my disgust for high school bullying. That’s such a fragile time for anyone in the first place and to add on the cruelty is just an equation for trauma: whether it be eating disorders, self-mutilation, school shooting, etc. Anyways, the book was written well in my opinion, with a good solid story behind it. There were a few parts I would have liked to have happened differently but it was good. I liked the open ending and the character development. It’s not an easy topic to read about but I would recommend this book.

Favorite Line:
‘It was kind of weird because eventually they were all so busy hating each other, they forgot about hating me.’

“People hate. That's our reality.”

157Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Okt. 1, 2014, 11:51pm



93. The Raven Boys – Maggie Stiefvater
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 416
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them--until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks to her. His name is Gansey, a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble. But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can't entirely explain. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul whose emotions range from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher who notices many things but says very little. For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She doesn't believe in true love, and never thought this would be a problem. But as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she's not so sure anymore.

Thoughts:
The dust cover makes this book out to be about romance but it’s really not. The book is much more about clairvoyance, and quests, and friendship. And it went fairly fast. This book seems to be setting things up mostly for the rest of the series, so you’d like it would be kind of slow but it wasn’t. I felt like the action flew by. I enjoyed the characters and the story. I am intrigued and will probably read the next book at some point in the future.

Favorite Line:
'He strode over to the ruined church. This, Blue had discovered, was how Gansey got places - striding. Walking was for ordinary people.'

158Kassilem
Okt. 2, 2014, 12:03am

Reading Stats: September

Books: 10
Pages: 2,936

Format:
Dead Tree: 6
Audiobook: 4

Category:
TBR: 5
Walk By-Pick Up: 5

Stars:
5 Stars: 1
4 Stars: 6
3 Stars: 3

Time Range:
1840-1849: 1
2000-2009: 1
2010-2014: 8

Genres:
Urban Fantasy: 3
Anthology: 3
Reference: 2
High Fantasy: 1
Gothic Fiction: 1
Lit Classics: 1
Mystery: 1
Dystopia: 1

Graphic Novels read: 2 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

159Thebookdiva
Okt. 2, 2014, 12:51pm

I'm reading Harry Potter Page to Screen and am loving it! It's taking me a bit longer as I am first rereading each book, then reading the chapters in Harry Potter Page to Screen that correspond with the book, and then re-watching the movie that goes with the book. It's been enormously interesting and fun.

160Kassilem
Okt. 2, 2014, 4:26pm

I am looking forward to watching all the movies again myself. Soon. As soon as I'm out of school :)

161Kassilem
Okt. 12, 2014, 5:17pm



94. Jane: The Woman Who Loved Tarzan - Robin Maxwell
Genre: Historical Fiction
Pages: 320
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Cambridge, England, 1905. Jane Porter is hardly a typical woman of her time. The only female student in Cambridge University’s medical program, she is far more comfortable in a lab coat dissecting corpses than she is in a corset and gown sipping afternoon tea. A budding paleoanthropologist, Jane dreams of traveling the globe in search of fossils that will prove the evolutionary theories of her scientific hero, Charles Darwin. When dashing American explorer Ral Conrath invites Jane and her father to join an expedition deep into West Africa, she can hardly believe her luck. Africa is every bit as exotic and fascinating as she has always imagined, but Jane quickly learns that the lush jungle is full of secrets—and so is Ral Conrath. When danger strikes, Jane finds her hero, the key to humanity’s past, and an all-consuming love in one extraordinary man: Tarzan of the Apes.

Thoughts:
This is the first version of Tarzan written by a female and authorized by the Edgar Rice Burroughs estate. It wasn’t quite what I was expected. There was a lot of literary license used to make a semi-original story and so there are a lot of changes from the original Tarzan story. Tarzan is raised by the Managi, a missing link species in human evolution rather than by gorillas. He’s also taken up when he’s four years old not one. Names were mixed around, new human tribes living nearby, hidden pyramids and cities in the jungles of Gabon, etc. I didn’t mind most of the changes in the end, and some of them did make some sense, but some of them caught me off guard and I never did fully embrace them. It’s an interesting story and I did appreciate the perspective being from Jane. I think I would recommend it to any Tarzan fan with a warning not to go into it with too many preconceptions about what is going to happen.

162Kassilem
Okt. 13, 2014, 1:15pm



95. The Night Season - Chelsea Cain
Genre: Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 352
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
He captured the Beauty Killer, one of the most deranged serial killers in the country. Now, Portland police detective Archie Sheridan faces a different kind of killer—a brutal rain season that has flooded the Willamette River, claiming several lives. As water levels rise, so does the fear. Because some of the victims didn’t drown—they were murdered. The first body contains a rare poison. Three others prove to be murders as well. And with each gruesome discovery the medical examiner uncovers, Archie begins to realize he has not escaped his nightmares—even with his deadliest enemy behind bars. The flood has washed up old skeletons from the past. And a ruthless new serial killer rules the night

Thoughts:
It’s been a while since I read the first three books in the Archie and Gretchen books, but I do remember very well that I liked the characterization in Cain’s books. And it being a thriller always makes for a quick read. This one was. Gretchen was not present until the very last chapter but the story was a thrill anyways. I don’t know if I would have liked it as much as I did if this had been a standalone novel. It’s Archie that I read these books for. Archie who I made a connection with. And he was true to his character in this book. If you like thrillers, Cain’s books might be some you’d like to read.

163saraslibrary
Okt. 13, 2014, 5:11pm

>162 Kassilem: I loved Heartsick, but I haven't read any of the other books in the series yet. It's good to know the series didn't go downhill. Thanks for the review! :)

164Kassilem
Okt. 14, 2014, 3:39pm

>163 saraslibrary: I've already got the next one on my holds list, Kill You Twice. It looks to be even more exciting than this past one, since Gretchen is present again. :)

165saraslibrary
Okt. 14, 2014, 4:15pm

Yeah, it wouldn't be as good if Gretchen wasn't in it, imho. ;) I hope you like it!

166Kassilem
Okt. 17, 2014, 4:01pm



96. Kill You Twice - Chelsea Cain
Genre: Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 368
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Gretchen claims to have inside knowledge about the grisly Mount Tabor Park murder—and Archie can’t risk losing his only lead in the case. At least, that’s what he tells himself after he agrees to visit Gretchen…But the ties between Archie and Gretchen have always been stronger, deeper, and more complex than he’s willing to admit, even to himself. What game is Gretchen playing this time? And even more frightening, what long-hidden secrets from her past have been dredged up that someone would kill to protect?

Thoughts:
Well these aren't phenomenal books but they are entertaining. There was a few times while I read this book where I thought it could have been done better, but I'm not really complaining because I did read this book in a day and a half, and it only took that long because of my busy schedule. I think the psychology behind Archie and Gretchen is interesting, even if I don't understand it all the time. But you don't have to understand everything about something for it to matter, especially human emotions. This is one of those times. There is one more book left. I'm looking forward to it. I believe it is the culmination of the series as a last book. And with Gretchen loose again I'm sure it will be interesting.

167saraslibrary
Okt. 18, 2014, 5:16pm

I'm glad you liked it overall! :) Gretchen on the loose. But of course! ;)

168Kassilem
Okt. 20, 2014, 2:58pm

>167 saraslibrary: Of course :) I've just finished the next book. Review will be up shortly.

169Kassilem
Okt. 20, 2014, 3:12pm



97. Let Me Go - Chelsea Cain
Genre: Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 384
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
Detective Archie Sheridan just has to get through the next few days, then his birthday and Halloween will be over. But with escaped serial killer Gretchen Lowell on the loose, the investigation into the murder of a DEA agent demanding his attention, and journalist Susan Ward showing up at his apartment needing a favor, it’s going to be a long weekend. Soon Archie finds himself crashing a masked ball on a private island owned by Jack Reynolds, a notorious local drug kingpin. By morning, Archie is back on painkillers, a guest is dead, and Archie quickly realizes that little is what it seems. One thing is clear: Gretchen is back, and Archie’s nemesis and sometime lover has something special in mind for the birthday boy. Now, on Halloween Eve, with time running out and the life of someone close to Archie on the line, Archie knows his only chance is to give Gretchen exactly what she wants. But Gretchen will prove more horrifying, and unpredictable, than Archie ever could have imagined.

Thought:
I don’t know if this is the last book in the series, not after reading the book. I feel like there is so much more left in the story. But I don’t know if more books would keep the thrill up or not. After a while, a chase between a man and serial killer can get old if it’s the same thing over and over. There are differences in each novel but I do feel like it’s the same thing over and over. Perhaps because I haven’t seen much character development between Archie and Gretchen, which would give it the change and the thrill to each novel. Still, like I’ve mentioned before, the books are still thrilling in themselves, since they are meant to be thrillers with mystery. I’ll be keeping my eyes out for a new book by Cain, in case this isn’t the last book in the series. If you enjoy serial killer mystery/thrillers, I would recommend this book.

170saraslibrary
Okt. 20, 2014, 4:23pm

You're a fast reader! I'm impressed. And perfect timing to be reading Let Me Go with Halloween coming up. I'm sure either Archie and Gretchen (or both!) will end up dying by the end of the series. Or it could be open-ended like The Silence of the Lambs, with maybe Gretchen escaping and never found again. Who knows. :)

171DeltaQueen50
Okt. 21, 2014, 6:16pm

Hi Melissa, I read the first two Archie/Gretchen books but then lost rack of the series. I will have ensure these are still on my wishlist as I remember they were fun and addictive reading.

172Kassilem
Okt. 22, 2014, 6:52pm

>170 saraslibrary: They are fast books. :) And I didn't even connect to the fact that Halloween is so close. I suppose I should be putting up some decorations and buying candy soon otherwise it'll be on top of me before I know it. Also, I didn't think of your last point either. That would actually make sense. Well I will be keeping an eye open for a new book.

>171 DeltaQueen50: Very addicting, yes! :) I hope you enjoy the rest of them.

173saraslibrary
Okt. 22, 2014, 7:09pm

You're not the only one who's behind on stocking on Halloween decorations, candy, etc. I don't think I'll be doing anything this year. I usually keep the outside light off anyway, so I don't have to give out candy. ;)

Chelsea Cain does have another book, One Kick, that came out a couple months ago, but it doesn't have anything to do with the Gretchen/Archie series. I'm not sure when her new G/A book will come out. Going by her track record, she only puts out one novel a year, and One Kick was it. We might have to wait until fall of 2015. :o

174Kassilem
Okt. 22, 2014, 11:37pm

>173 saraslibrary: Yes I saw that book, but I don't think I'm very interested right now. Archie is my favorite. I suppose I can wait since I ended up taking four or so years between the first three and the last three. :) And I doubt I'll be doing much this year for Halloween either. I usually sit on the couch and do school work while my brother gets the door. :/ But I do like to steal the candy from the bowl.

On another note I finally completed another 2014 goal: Number 6! Finally, my car is paid off. It's been a trick paying for it while going to school. Now I feel like I can breathe a little bit.

Also, I'm gonna cross off Number 5. I can't consistently make 4 times a week all the time but I'm as close as I think I am going to get: MWF 6:00 am for a Body Pump class and Saturday Body Flow. I usually miss Friday's gym class. By the end of the week I have a very hard time getting up that early.

Number 1 and 7 are coming along. Putting in the last touches slowly for the cross-stitch and only six more weeks until I graduate with a degree. Both are very exciting. Number 3 might be pushed into next year. I've been told that I will be getting the clear in January latest.

1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
✔ 5. Get to the gym four times a week
✔ 6. Pay off my car
7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
✔ 9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

Anyways, there's not much to update besides the above. School has once again taken over my life. But as mentioned, only six weeks left. Then I graduate! Then I'm gonna have to go job hunting. :/ But on the bright side I will have more time to read. And write. That has really taken a slide into no progress. And hopefully six months after that I will be on my way abroad for two years!

175Kassilem
Okt. 22, 2014, 11:42pm

Question for any/everyone:

There are a few people here that have been in the Peace Corps is that correct? Or even those who have studied abroad? What was your reading situation?

I am imagining that where I'll be in Africa, there won't be any local library to borrow books from, minus the Peace Corps Office which I hear house a variety of reads. I suppose I'm picturing myself taking a E-Reader and MP3 with me and borrowing e-books and audio books through my normal library's overdrive system, but I don't really know how feasible this is.

Any thoughts on the matter? Thanks in advance.

176saraslibrary
Okt. 25, 2014, 3:06pm

>174 Kassilem: No worries. I'll probably do the same with the Archie series. :) It takes me forever to finish series anymore.

Stealing Halloween candy is a holiday tradition. Keep it going! ;)



Yay for no more car payments! And you're doing amazing on your other goals. Good job! :)

>175 Kassilem: I don't know anyone in Peace Corps, sorry. :( But maybe bring sunblock? And stay out of the west part of Africa? ;) And your best bet is probably checking stuff out electronically via your library.

177Kassilem
Okt. 26, 2014, 4:24pm

>176 saraslibrary: Thanks! And I will definitely be bringing sunblock. I'm actually set to go to Ghana which is west Africa, so my placement has been on hold for a while. But if I do end up going there its right near the equator. :)

178saraslibrary
Okt. 26, 2014, 5:04pm

No Vitamin D deficiency for you there! ;) Just be careful and have fun. Oh sheesh. I sound like a parent. *facepalm*

179DeltaQueen50
Okt. 26, 2014, 5:56pm

I'm going to sound like a parent as well, I hope they think long and hard about your personal safety and health before they send you to Ghana. It's right in the heart of West Africa where they are having such a terrible time with e-bola.

180saraslibrary
Okt. 26, 2014, 6:21pm

What Delta said. :)

181Kassilem
Okt. 26, 2014, 6:58pm

>179 DeltaQueen50: & 180 That's why the placement is on hold at the moment. :/ I am a little worried this will set me back for a while before they are comfortable taking volunteers to the country again, but perhaps they will place me somewhere else. :)

182DeltaQueen50
Okt. 27, 2014, 1:28pm

>181 Kassilem: I figured that the Peace Corp would be very careful about their members safety but one can't help but be a Mom sometimes! ;)

183Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Nov. 1, 2014, 2:50pm



98. The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman
Genre: Gothic Fantasy
Pages: 336
Rating: 3 Stars
(TBR - 'Best 21st c. Fantasy)

Summary:
Bod is an unusual boy who inhabits an unusual place—he's the only living resident of a graveyard. Raised from infancy by the ghosts, werewolves, and other cemetery denizens, Bod has learned the antiquated customs of his guardians' time as well as their ghostly teachings—such as the ability to Fade so mere mortals cannot see him. Can a boy raised by ghosts face the wonders and terrors of the worlds of both the living and the dead? And then there are being such as ghouls that aren't really one thing or the other.

Thoughts:
This book didn't really grab me. I found the same thing when I read Gaiman's other children's book Coraline as well. I'm not sure why they don't as both are raved about. This book won the Newbery Medal, the Carnegie Medal and is a Hugo Award Winner for Best Novel. That's suppose to say something. But I guess it's just not my cup of tea. Certainly not a bas book. It's good writing and an interesting story... Oh well. We are have some of those books that just don't do it for us. I'm not giving up on Gaiman yet since he has many adult books that I have yet to pick up. But I'm not sure I'll return to his children books.

184Kassilem
Okt. 27, 2014, 1:33pm

>182 DeltaQueen50: :) You are very welcome to be a mom here if you want! I'm still figuring life out as a young adult so any and all advice is very welcome. :) Hope life is treating you well!

185saraslibrary
Okt. 27, 2014, 4:27pm

>183 Kassilem: I'm the same way about a couple of Gaiman's book; some of them just don't grab you. Better luck with something else by him! :)

186drachenbraut23
Bearbeitet: Okt. 27, 2014, 4:38pm

>175 Kassilem: A friend and collegue of mine is serving presently for 10 month on The Mercy ship, which just arrived in Madagaskar. She is an avid reader as well and just for this occassion got herself an e-book reader. As she lives with three other girls in tiny bunks on a ship it would have been impossible for her to take any amount of books with her.

I am glad to hear that the peace corps are looking out for the safety for their members. Although, so far Ghana hasn't been affected by any Ebola cases. My friend and collegue had to wait as well, because of the Ebola outbreak, she was supposed to leave for the Mercy ship by the end of July and only left at the beginning of October. Safety is always better than feeling sorry afterwards.

Sorry, that you didn't enjoy The Graveyard Book I did, when I read it with my son when he was younger.

187Kassilem
Okt. 28, 2014, 3:58pm

>185 saraslibrary: Thanks!

>186 drachenbraut23: I think the e-reader is the way to go too. :) And safety is so very important.

Question for all: Which e-reader is the best in your opinion?

188DeltaQueen50
Okt. 28, 2014, 5:34pm

I have a Kobo, an old-school Kindle, and a Kindle Paperwhite. Without a doubt I prefer the Kindles for their easy use. My older Kindle I keep as I use it for the odd audible book that I listen to. The Paperwhite is my preferred e-reader mostly due to how easy it is to purchase books with a simple push of a button, and for me, I find it the easier one to navigate and understand it's menus.

189drachenbraut23
Okt. 28, 2014, 6:19pm

I tried several different ones, but I like the kindle best. I still own a kindle keyboard (working fine) and one of the newer smaller and lighter kindles and I also have the kindle app on my iPad mini for night time reading :)

190Kassilem
Nov. 1, 2014, 2:47pm

>188 DeltaQueen50: & >189 drachenbraut23: Thanks Judy and Bianca. I believe I will be buying a Kindle then. :)

191Kassilem
Nov. 1, 2014, 2:59pm



99. Immortal: A Novel of the Fallen Angels - J. R. Ward
Genre: Urban Fantasy, Romance
Pages: 388
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
This is a world where sin and salvation collide. This is a world where a cynical fallen angel struggles with the seven deadly sins and seven chosen souls. With the spellbinding Immortal, the riveting series that “changed the face of paranormal romance” (Suit101.com) comes to an epic close as mankind’s reluctant savior struggles with his greatest challenge yet.

Thoughts:
I didn’t realize this would be the last book. Now the series is over. I’m not as upset as I thought I might be. This last book didn’t seem on par with the first few in this series. Something about it seemed a little off. I still really enjoyed the way these characters talked and interacted, especially the men. I’ve never been that much into the romance of Ward’s books. Speaking of which the romance wasn’t like Ward’s usual here either. I can’t say if that’s a good thing or not. However given that this book was the culmination of the war present in this series it kind of makes sense that the lovin’ would be on the back burner. I guess the ending was a little anti-climatic for me. But there’s still a sweetness there. I’m looking forward to Ward’s newest book in 2015 for her Black Dagger Brotherhood series. If you enjoy paranormal romance I would recommend this series and that one.

Favorite Line:
‘“You might as well stand over here with me by the window. If shit gets critical, we can Hollywood-stuntman it out of the line of fire.”
(Pg 102)

192Kassilem
Nov. 1, 2014, 3:17pm

Reading Stats: October

Books: 6
Pages: 2,148

Format:
Dead Tree: 6
Audiobook: 0

Category:
TBR: 5
New: 1

Stars:
4 Stars: 5
3 Stars: 1

Time Range:
2010-2014: 6

Genres:
Mystery: 3
Thriller: 3
Historical Fiction: 1
Gothic Fantasy: 1
Urban Fantasy: 1
Romance: 1

Graphic Novels read: 13 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

193saraslibrary
Nov. 1, 2014, 4:11pm

>191 Kassilem: I have yet to start anything by J.R. Ward, because the size of her books is pretty daunting. But when I'm in a I-like-'em-big mood, then I might try one. Thanks! :) Sorry to hear it wasn't as good as you'd hoped, though.

194Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Nov. 3, 2014, 1:00am

>193 saraslibrary: I hope you like them when you get to it :)

And another goal done! Number 7! Yay. Now I'm gonna have to go out and get another one to occupy me in the spring when I'm out of school.

1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
✔ 5. Get to the gym four times a week
✔ 6. Pay off my car
✔ 7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
✔ 9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

195lkernagh
Nov. 3, 2014, 11:47am

Love the cross stitch!

196saraslibrary
Nov. 3, 2014, 2:48pm

Beautifully done! :) Congrats on finishing it.

197ronincats
Nov. 4, 2014, 12:10am

That is quite an accomplishment and a lot of work!

198Kassilem
Nov. 4, 2014, 4:15pm

Thanks Lori, Sara & Roni! It was quite a job. I think it was a year and a half ago that I bought it. But I can't do it consistently because of school. Most of it gets done during the summers. :) I'm dying to get another one but I told myself to wait until I graduate at least. It doesn't help that I'm on a great audio book, which is a great excuse for me to just sit for hours and cross-stitch while listening.

199saraslibrary
Bearbeitet: Nov. 4, 2014, 5:29pm

That's a great combo: audiobooks and needlework. I can't wait to see you next cross-stitch. :)

200Ape
Nov. 8, 2014, 8:57pm

Hi Melissa! I noticed today that I must have de-starred you at some point. Oops! I'm back to lurking all creepy-like on your thread. Nothing weird about that, I'm sur eyou agree. :)

201Kassilem
Nov. 9, 2014, 2:58pm

>199 saraslibrary: I just bought another one yesterday. "The Forest in Autumn". I'm really looking forward to it. I'll be sure to put some updates here.

>200 Ape: Nothing creepy about it at all. :) I seem to do that a lot myself on most threads here. Welcome back!

202Kassilem
Nov. 9, 2014, 3:04pm



100. Concepts of Genetics - Robert J Brooker
Genre: Non-Fiction, Science
Pages: 736
Rating: 3 Stars
(Textbook)

Summary:
Concepts of Genetics is a one semester introductory genetics text that explains genetics concepts in a concise, engaging and up to date manner. Rob Brooker, author of market leading texts in Genetics and Intro Biology for majors, brings his clear and accessible writing style to this new text. He employs the use of experimentation and stresses the fundamentals of the Scientific Method in presenting genetics concepts, then further engages the reader through the use of formative assessment to assist the student in understanding the core genetic principles.

Thoughts:
I am very interested in genetics so this book wasn’t too bad. However it was dry like most science textbooks are. It also wasn’t used much for the class I bought it for. However it has all the basic knowledge on genetics that any students needs either as a supplement or as a primary text. There was enough images to keep the book from being abysmally boring, but you’d have to be interested in the subject and have read the text to make sense of most of them. Still it was pretty colorful which is always good in a textbook. Probably a book I will be keeping for future references.

203Kassilem
Nov. 9, 2014, 4:21pm



101. A Storm of Swords – George R R Martin
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 1,216
Rating: 5 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
Of the five contenders for power, one is dead, another in disfavor, and still the wars rage as violently as ever, as alliances are made and broken. Joffrey, of House Lannister, sits on the Iron Throne, the uneasy ruler of the land of the Seven Kingdoms. His most bitter rival, Lord Stannis, stands defeated and disgraced, the victim of the jealous sorceress who holds him in her evil thrall. But young Robb, of House Stark, still rules the North from the fortress of Riverrun. Robb plots against his despised Lannister enemies, even as they hold his sister hostage at King’s Landing, the seat of the Iron Throne. Meanwhile, making her way across a blood-drenched continent is the exiled queen, Daenerys, mistress of the only three dragons still left in the world. But as opposing forces maneuver for the final titanic showdown, an army of barbaric wildlings arrives from the outermost line of civilization. In their vanguard is a horde of mythical Others--a supernatural army of the living dead whose animated corpses are unstoppable. As the future of the land hangs in the balance, no one will rest until the Seven Kingdoms have exploded in a veritable storm of swords.

Thoughts:
Man. I forgot a lot of this book from the first time I read it. I thought half of the third season on the TV show ‘Game of Thrones’ was taken from the fourth book but the as far as I can see the majority of it came from this third book. Then again, I can’t remember much of the fourth book either. It seems that on my first read of this series everything sort of melded together. It has been quite a few years. That’s why series like these deserve a reread every decade or two. Especially when it takes that long to write the series. I’m almost caught up to where I ended the first time. Back then the fifth book A Dance with Dragons wasn’t out yet. I’m looking forward to that one, with its new material. Anyways, as for this book, it’s as much a masterpiece as the first two books, although it might have been more heart wrenching than either of the first two. There are a lot of deaths in this third volume. And it’s not like the deaths of the people the readers hate are that satisfying either, because the consequences of those deaths hurt so many other people in the aftermath as revenge is taken. It’s a never ending cycle of hate. It’s a hard book to read at parts. I avoided the book for a few days because I didn’t want to listen/read about the Red Wedding. I knew it was coming and I knew it would devastate me all over again. It’s funny, the way a lot of us flock to books and mangas and shows and movies that are so depressing. And yet we love them. It is interesting to reread these books after watching the TV show. It really puts life to some of the characters. I can really picture the direwolfs now. And some of the lesser characters have faces to them. But the books are where the magic started and where they stay. It’s not an easy read, but I have to say that if you haven’t read these books, they deserve your nose in their pages.

204saraslibrary
Nov. 9, 2014, 5:57pm

>201 Kassilem: Awesome! Can't wait to see your progress. :)

205Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 1, 2014, 1:21pm



102. A Feast for Crows – George R R Martin
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Pages: 1,104
Rating: 4 Stars
(Reread)

Summary:
With the death of the monstrous King Joffrey, Cersei is ruling as regent in King’s Landing. Robb Stark’s demise has broken the back of the Northern rebels, and his siblings are scattered throughout the kingdom like seeds on barren soil. Few legitimate claims to the once desperately sought Iron Throne still exist—or they are held in hands too weak or too distant to wield them effectively. The war, which raged out of control for so long, has burned itself out. But as in the aftermath of any climactic struggle, it is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising faces—some familiar, others only just appearing—are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead. It is a time when the wise and the ambitious, the deceitful and the strong will acquire the skills, the power, and the magic to survive the stark and terrible times that lie before them. It is a time for nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages to come together and stake their fortunes and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests—but only a few are the survivors.

Thoughts:
I now know why I didn't remember most of this book from my first reading. It's most likely because I skipped huge chucks of it. Half the character perspectives in this fourth installment are of characters I don't like or didn't care for. I got through every word of it this time. Luckily when you're listening to an audio book it's so much harder to skip ahead that you just don't attempt to. While some of the chapters I might not have cared for, they still were very important to the storyline, which is no doubt why they are in there. And the chapters from the perspective of those I don't like, well... I have to admit it does give you the justification that that character gives her or himself for their actions, which I think is important, especially in this series which is not about right or wrong. But still, there were times I felt like reaching into the audio book and strangling Cersei. Hopefully she gets what's coming to her. I did enjoy Jamie's journey through this volume at least. The volume gets a four star because I struggled to get through the book. I am now all caught up to where I was when I left off this series. It's all new ground from here which should be exciting, at least until I finish A Dance With Dragons and have to wait for the sixth book then. The series is highly recommended, even if you have to push yourself through this fourth book.

206lunacat
Dez. 1, 2014, 1:08pm

Just felt I should point out that there is a fairly big spoiler in the opening sentence of your review - I get that anyone interested in reading the review might know what occurs, but I certainly didn't and while I don't mind spoilers others might.

207Kassilem
Dez. 1, 2014, 1:13pm

Reading Stats: November

Books: 3
Pages: 3,056

Format:
Dead Tree: 1
Audiobook: 2

Category:
Reread: 2
Textbook: 1

Stars:
5 Stars: 1
4 Stars: 1
3 Stars: 1

Time Range:
2000-2009: 2
2010-2014: 1

Genres:
Epic Fantasy: 2
Non-Fiction: 1
Science: 1

Graphic Novels read: 15 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

Wow, my November was a little lackluster. Hopefully December is a better month in regards to books. Page-wise I guess I did read more than in October, but still. It was a hard month. Three more weeks of school and then I graduate! Then I'll have a month off before I need to start freaking out about getting a job and moving on with my life, whichever direction that is. By the way, I started my third cross-stitch project. I will upload a picture of the project goal later today. :)

208Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 1, 2014, 1:23pm

>206 lunacat:. I apologize! I didn't even realize. I usually just copy the summaries from amazon to give others an idea of the book. I've seen some people put spoiler hides in their threads. Would you be able to tell me where to go to see how that is done? Again, I apologize if that was a spoiler for you.

Edit: I figured out how to do the spoiler. You learn new things everyday. I will make sure to keep a sharper eye on the summaries.

209lunacat
Dez. 1, 2014, 1:23pm

No worries, it's not an issue as I don't mind, just didn't want someone else who was in the midst of the books to stumble accidentally across it.

It's the same as other tags I believe (spoiler) spoiler text (/spoiler) but with > instead of curved brackets.

Something dastardly

210Kassilem
Dez. 1, 2014, 1:24pm

:)

211Kassilem
Dez. 1, 2014, 1:59pm

Here's my new cross-stitch project. It's big. I didn't realize how big it was when I bought it. But I now know what all the numbers mean since after seeing how big it was I decided I really ought to figure it out for future knowledge. :) It's also my first one that wasn't a kit, so I got the great experience of going out and buying all my thread. It was all very enlightening and I feel I know much more about the whole cross-stitching now.

Anyways, many audio books will be in attendance as I work my way through this one. It'll help that I'll have a lot of time off soon.


212saraslibrary
Dez. 2, 2014, 6:20pm

>207 Kassilem: Three more weeks of school?? Awesome! I'll bet you're super stoked about that. :)

>211 Kassilem: Good luck with your cross stitch! That is beautiful. I have no doubt you'll be able to make yours looks just as gorgeous.

213lunacat
Dez. 2, 2014, 6:33pm

Wow, very nice :). I hope it goes well. My mum spent the whole of my childhood doing cross stitch and we had box loads of thread carefully marked up with its colour number and sorted into sets - blues, greens etc. Then when my mum was following a pattern we had fun finding the right box from the labels and fetching her the next colour she needed - well, it was fun to a five year old anyway. She knits now as her eyes can't cope with it any more.

Maybe I should start up as I know she's still got a whole load of cross stitch supplies.....hmm.....there's a thought!

214Kassilem
Dez. 2, 2014, 7:28pm

>212 saraslibrary: I've very stoked. At the moment I'm not allowing myself to think about it so that I don't get "senioritis". As long as I don't think about how close I am, I can still find the motivation to do all my homework. :) But once I'm done I plan on relaxing and doing nothing but reading and writing and watching TV until mid-January.

>213 lunacat: Thanks! That's a good way to keep the threads organized. At the moment I've got my threads separated by zip-lock bags, snack size. But I have so many now that I put them all in a shoebox numerically by the DMC numbers. The box is full now. :) I'm still playing around with having an easy way to organize them.

215saraslibrary
Dez. 2, 2014, 7:31pm

>214 Kassilem: You totally deserve to relax afterwards! :) College is extremely hard work. Good job making it this far! :)

216Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 2, 2014, 7:45pm



103. The Ice Dragon – George R R Martin
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 107
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
The ice dragon was a creature of legend and fear, for no man had ever tamed one. When it flew overhead, it left in its wake desolate cold and frozen land. But Adara was not afraid. For Adara was a winter child, born during the worst freeze that anyone, even the Old Ones, could remember. Adara could not remember the first time she had seen the ice dragon. It seemed that it had always been in her life, glimpsed from afar as she played in the frigid snow long after the other children had fled the cold. In her fourth year she touched it, and in her fifth year she rode upon its broad, chilled back for the first time. Then, in her seventh year, on a calm summer day, fiery dragons from the North swooped down upon the peaceful farm that was Adara’s home. And only a winter child—and the ice dragon who loved her—could save her world from utter destruction.

Thoughts:
This book is a children's book. But it is Martin so I thought I would give it a try. There is certainly Martin's style here; he's not afraid to hide from reality even for children. This story has a happy ending but it's an ending that is tainted by past trauma. People and dragons who were loved died before the happy ending came. I read the edition where the illustrator was Yvonne Gilbert, and the illustrations were good. Probably not the best considering children's books nowadays but it still got the story across in pictures for me. It was a fun book that took about a half hour to read. If you're a hard core Martin fan, then I'd say go ahead and pick the book up.

217Kassilem
Dez. 2, 2014, 7:44pm

>215 saraslibrary: Thanks Sara! It has been incredibly hard. But rewarding as well. :)

218saraslibrary
Dez. 2, 2014, 8:07pm

I forgot, but what degree are you getting?

219lunacat
Dez. 2, 2014, 9:27pm

My mum had the bobbins at the top of this page:

http://www.flossandmischief.com/events/cross-stitch-alphabet-workshop-is-back/

With the DMC numbers written on top, and then she had long clear plastic tubs - like Tupperware but ones she'd got secondhand or really cheaply, that were the right size to fit two or three columns side by side in. Then on top she stuck the labels with the beginning and end numbers on it.

When she had a project going she'd put the canvas, the needles, a pair of scissors, the pattern and all the colours she needed in a zip plastic folder so it was completely ready for her. I'm sure you do something similar already though.

220Kassilem
Dez. 2, 2014, 11:06pm

>218 saraslibrary: I'm majoring in Anthropology with a minor in Biology.

I'm looking to go to graduate school for Molecular Anthropology, eventually, but I want a break to experience the world and grow up a little more first (I feel like I've always been ding school - I went into it straight from high school). I'm still waiting to see if I'm for sure going to the Peace Corps. The Ebola has my placement on hold but I should know mid January. I've also applied for a job in CA at a genetics company and hopefully will know soon if I've been accepted or denied. If neither of those options pan out I might look at a few other options or just look at applying to grad schools then. That will still set me out another year before going which hopefully will be enough of a break in between schooling.

>219 lunacat: That's an interesting way to do it. I might have to take up something similar if I continue to do these projects. Beforehand I was doing kits and just set aside the remainder threads. Now that I've moved past kits and have a slew of bags full of threads, however, I'm sure I will accumulate more and more threads and need to find a different method. I like how I have them in separate bags dependent on the DMC #, but eventually I need to organize them better so that I can easily find them. :) Thanks for the suggestion.

I hope life is treating you both well. :)

221saraslibrary
Dez. 3, 2014, 10:16pm

>220 Kassilem: Wow! I am so completely impressed. You are prepared for just about anything. Go, you! :) You'll find what you want; no doubt about that.

222RosyLibrarian
Dez. 4, 2014, 8:53am

>220 Kassilem: I admire you for getting everything planned out before you graduate. I finished my undergrad and kind of went, uh, now what? :)

I think it is brilliant to get some real world experience though. I took a two year gap between my undergrad and graduate degrees to see what was out there.

Crossing my fingers for your Peace Corp app. It is crazy to think how much influence this year's ebola outbreak has caused. It's very troubling.

223Kassilem
Dez. 4, 2014, 1:36pm

>221 saraslibrary: Thank you. I'm positive that whatever happens it will be good for me. :)

>222 RosyLibrarian: I'm the kind of person that always needs to be doing something with my time, and change - I usually like change and challenging myself. I'm always challenging myself and finding my limits. And I guess I always have some kind of goals or am making goals. This year has been a pretty big one for goals. :) My fingers are crossed too for the Peace Corps. I feel that it would be such a life-changing experience and just the shake up I would benefit from.

224DeltaQueen50
Dez. 6, 2014, 1:30pm

It looks like your life is about to go through some major changes, Melissa. I also think you are wise to get some life experience before jumping into graduate school. I sure hope everything works out how you want it and Africa is still on the table as that would be an amazing opportunity.

225Kassilem
Dez. 6, 2014, 6:35pm

Thanks Judy! Me too.

226Ape
Dez. 6, 2014, 6:48pm

You sure are adventurous! Me, I mostly hide my head under my pillow and worry about every thing imaginable. You're my hero! :P

227Kassilem
Dez. 6, 2014, 10:49pm

>226 Ape: :) Proud to be a hero! I think I just like to test my limits

228Kassilem
Dez. 10, 2014, 12:38pm



104. Shifting Shadows: Stories from the World of Mercy Thompson - Patricia Briggs
Genre: Urban Fantasy, Anthology
Pages: 464
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
A collection of all-new and previously published short stories featuring Mercy Thompson, “one of the best heroines in the urban fantasy genre today” (Fiction Vixen Book Reviews), and the characters she calls friends. Includes the new stories: “Silver”, “Roses in Winter”, “Redemption”, “Hollow”. And reader favorites: “Fairy Gifts”, “Gray”, “Alpha and Omega”, “Seeing Eye”, “The Star of David”, and “In Red, with Pearls”.

Thoughts:
This was a great book. I've actually never come across any of these short stories. Probably because I don't often read anthologies. I might have to rectify that because I thoroughly enjoyed these ones. I'm a big fan of Briggs however and her Mercedes Thompson series so I am a little biased. I enjoyed seeing characters I liked and characters that I had forgotten about. If you are a Briggs fan I do highly recommend this book. The book is a little long but I hardly noticed the length. I am looking forward to the newest Brigg's installment.

229Kassilem
Dez. 13, 2014, 8:28pm



105. American Gods - Neil Gaiman
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 560
Rating: 3 Stars
(My Bookshelf / 21st c Best Fantasy)

Summary:
Shadow is a man with a past. But now he wants nothing more than to live a quiet life with his wife and stay out of trouble. Until he learns that she's been killed in a terrible accident. Flying home for the funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane, a strange man in the seat next to him introduces himself. The man calls himself Mr. Wednesday, and he knows more about Shadow than is possible. He warns Shadow that a far bigger storm is coming. And from that moment on, nothing will ever be the same.

Thoughts:
I don't know if Gaiman just isn't my cup of tea or if I keep finding the books of his that don't work for me. I had to struggle through this book. It was intriguing and Gaiman-weird. But I feel like it didn't go anywhere, that it ended up just being almost a life story with some mystery and I've never been a big fan of 'life stories'. Also some scenes left me wondering why they had been included. After finishing it, I'm mostly confused. There are interesting lessons or messages in the book, which I am beginning to see are part of Gaiman's books, but overall I'm mostly just glad I finished the book. Gaiman is still I reader I will pursue in the future since so many of his books are known, but I will be taking a break from this author for a while.

230saraslibrary
Bearbeitet: Dez. 14, 2014, 3:12am

>229 Kassilem: I understand what you mean about Gaiman. I like him and everything, but I think he's over-hyped. Probably the only book I really enjoyed by him was Neverwhere. And even though I never read the book, I really enjoyed Coraline (the movie) as well.

231kgodey
Dez. 14, 2014, 1:03pm

>229 Kassilem: Gaiman is so famous because he did a lot of things that fantasy didn't do at the time and people who wouldn't otherwise go anywhere near a fantasy book loved his work. He opened up the market for a lot more types of fantasy, too. It was a revelation for me when I first read his books because I'd never read anything like them before, but now, he's just another writer with his own particular "weird" style (which I'm in the mood for occasionally).

232lunacat
Dez. 14, 2014, 1:18pm

I thoroughly enjoyed the radio drama adaptation of Neverwhere that the BBC did, it was incredibly good. Having said that, I've still never made it through a Gaiman book, I tend to read five or ten pages and not be caught. I'll keep persevering though, as so many people seem to love him!

233Kassilem
Dez. 14, 2014, 1:31pm

>230 saraslibrary: & >232 lunacat: Neverwhere is on my list to read because a lot of people have said they liked it too.

>231 kgodey: That explains some things. Like a modern Tolkien sort of. I had a hard time reading his trilogy too come to think of it. I suppose I like what I like. Gaiman is a author I will come back to because his "weird"style is a little intriguing, but I think I will stick to his shorter books :)

On a random note I found this awesome blog: 24 Insanely Clever Gifts for Book Lovers HERE

My favorites are #5, 6 & 23 :)

234saraslibrary
Dez. 14, 2014, 1:55pm

>233 Kassilem: LOL! Omg, I love that! Thanks for sharing. :) I'm going to post it on my thread, too. I'm stingy--I love them all. :D

235ronincats
Dez. 14, 2014, 10:13pm

American Gods was my first Gaiman and not a particular favorite. On the other hand, I love Anansi Boys, the sort-of sequel.

236Kassilem
Dez. 17, 2014, 2:38pm

> 234 It's awesome isn't it!

>235 ronincats: I had no idea Anansi Boys was a sort of sequel. That one is also on the BBC list I'm working through slowly. Hmm. I might look that one up later as my next Gaiman. :)

237Kassilem
Dez. 17, 2014, 2:47pm



106. Essential Organic Chemistry - Paula Bruice
Genre: Non-Fiction, Science
Pages: 624
Rating: 3 Stars
(Textbook)

Summary:
This organic chemistry reference helps readers see organic chemistry as an interesting and exciting science—and encourages the development of critical-thinking skills. Bruice presents reactions with enough detail to give readers a solid understanding of reactivity, rather than rote memorization. Once readers understand the reasons behind the reactivity of organic compounds, they will be better prepared to understand the reactions involved in such areas as metabolism, PCR, and genetic engineering.

Thoughts:
This was a necessary book. It wasn't bad but a little dry. I can't imagine any book on chemistry would be anything but dry for me. Not sure what else to say about it than that. Not very many pictures, lots of reaction problems.

238RosyLibrarian
Dez. 17, 2014, 3:12pm

>237 Kassilem: I think my head would crack open if I had to read a textbook on Chemistry. ;)

239Ape
Dez. 17, 2014, 8:42pm

My head cracked a little too until I realized I read the title wrong. :P

240Kassilem
Dez. 18, 2014, 2:33pm

241Kassilem
Dez. 18, 2014, 2:40pm



107. Invisibility - David Levithan & Andrea Cremer
Genre: Urban Fantasy
Pages: 284
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Stephen is used to invisibility. He was born that way. Invisible. Cursed. Elizabeth sometimes wishes for invisibility. When you’re invisible, no one can hurt you. So when her mother decides to move the family to New York City, Elizabeth is thrilled. It’s easy to blend in there. Then Stephen and Elizabeth meet. To Stephen’s amazement, she can see him. And to Elizabeth’s amazement, she wants him to be able to see her—all of her. But as the two become closer, an invisible world gets in their way—a world of grudges and misfortunes, spells and curses. And once they’re thrust into this world, Elizabeth and Stephen must decide how deep they’re going to go—because the answer could mean the difference between love and death.

Thoughts:
I picked this book up because David Levithan had a hand in writing it and I'm on a mission to read everything by Levithan (mission accomplished now) but also because it sounded interesting. I was interested in reading a story about someone who is invisible, what that would be like in a world full of visible people. The book did not disappoint. I enjoyed Levithan's chapters immensely and Cremer's chapters were not bad either. The book turned into a direction I wasn't anticipating - I think I was thinking it would be similar to Levithan's Every Day book where the magic/fantasy is subtle and not discussed very much. This book threw the magic/fantasy into your face but it only startled me I think because I wasn't expecting it. If you're a fan of urban fantasy, Andrea Cremer or David Levithan I would recommend this book.

242Kassilem
Dez. 18, 2014, 5:03pm

Hmm. My Top 5 of 2014.

1. Oryx and Crake - Margaret Atwood
2. Words of Radiance - Brandon Sanderson
3. Skin Game - Jim Butcher
4. Fool's Assassin - Robin Hobb
5. How They Met and Other Stories - David Levithan

243saraslibrary
Dez. 19, 2014, 12:04am

Nice top 5. :) I haven't read any of those, but I may do a top 5 on my thread as well. Thanks for the idea!

244rosylibrarian
Dez. 19, 2014, 9:01am

>242 Kassilem: Oryx and Crake, yes!! I love those books. The tone she uses throughout the series is perfect. And I really need to keep going on Jim Butcher's series...

245Kassilem
Dez. 20, 2014, 12:44am

> 243 Yep! I saw someone else do it on a thread as well and figured I probably wasn't going to come across any more 5 Star books in the last days of this year :)

>244 rosylibrarian: I've been addicted to Butcher's series for a while. Can't seem to get enough. And I agree about Atwood. I didn't like her second two books as much as the first one but the first one really caught me.

246Ape
Dez. 20, 2014, 6:31am

Hi Melissa! Love your list. Now post it here, why dontcha? :D

247Kassilem
Dez. 20, 2014, 3:45pm

>246 Ape: Those lists are interesting. :) I've added my top 5 to the bunch. Thanks for the heads up.

248Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 20, 2014, 3:51pm



108. Vengeance - Megan Miranda
Genre: Gothic Fantasy
Pages: 344
Rating: 4 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Nobody really believes in a curse. Until you know the people who disappear. Too much coincidence, you look for reason. Too much death, you grasp for something to blame. Carson pulled Delaney out and he died on the side of the road with her mouth pressed to his. Her air in his body. Troy. She told the cops it was suicide. Didn't matter. The lake released her and grabbed another. But when Decker's father dies in a pool of spilled water on their kitchen floor, all Decker can feel is a slow burning rage. Because he knows that Delaney knew that his dad was going to die. She knew and backed out of his house and never said a word. Falcon Lake still has a hold on them both, and Decker can't forgive Delaney until he knows why.

Thoughts:
This is the second book after Fracture. I read the book pretty fast; it like the first book is a page turner. I think it's the mystery in the book that pulls you in but all the danger and thrill. It really seems like someone or something is out to get these people because of what happened before. There were a few flaws I could see in the book but they didn't deter from the book overly much. It's not a book I will read again but it was interesting and worth the few hours.

249Kassilem
Dez. 21, 2014, 12:00am

I have another goal done! # 1. I graduated with a Bachelor's Degree yesterday in Anthropology with a Biology minor. :) It still hasn't really hit me yet but I'm sure it will soon enough. A picture is below.

I've also crossed off #3. Technically I was accepted into the Peace Corps I just haven't been placed yet.

BIG things are about to happen :)

✔ 1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
✔ 3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
✔ 5. Get to the gym four times a week
✔ 6. Pay off my car
✔ 7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
✔ 9. Read 75 books
10. Be happy

250kgodey
Dez. 21, 2014, 2:25am

Congrats Melissa :)

251scaifea
Dez. 21, 2014, 9:38am

Oh, congrats!!

252RosyLibrarian
Dez. 21, 2014, 9:59am

Congratulations!!

253Ape
Dez. 21, 2014, 10:00am

*High fives*

254Kassilem
Dez. 21, 2014, 11:56am

Thanks everyone!!!

255ronincats
Dez. 21, 2014, 1:00pm

Wow, congratulations on a truly successful year, Melissa! Be happy!

256saraslibrary
Dez. 21, 2014, 3:49pm



I'm so happy for you! TWO things done. Awesome! :) You're quite the go-getter.

257DeltaQueen50
Dez. 21, 2014, 7:19pm

Congratulations Melissa! It looks like #10 is falling into place as well. :)

258PaulCranswick
Dez. 22, 2014, 4:15am

Well done Melissa!

259MickyFine
Dez. 23, 2014, 4:37pm

Adding my congrats to the pile. :)

260Kassilem
Dez. 23, 2014, 5:52pm

Thank you everyone!!! I do feel very accomplished. :)

261Kassilem
Dez. 23, 2014, 6:01pm



109. The Slow Regard of Silent Things - Patrick Rothfuss
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 159
Rating: 3 Stars
(New)

Summary:
Deep below the University, there is a dark place. Few people know of it: a broken web of ancient passageways and abandoned rooms. A young woman lives there, tucked among the sprawling tunnels of the Underthing, snug in the heart of this forgotten place. Her name is Auri, and she is full of mysteries.

Thoughts:
Hmm... well I think my favorite part of the book was the end where Rothfuss is explaining why he wrote this and why he published it. The rest was interesting, but not catching for me. There were parts where I related to Auri, as something broken, as someone up against the unbearable weight of the world at times. But the majority of the time I was reading the book for the sake of reading it. The book is very lyrical and full of Auri words, but if you're looking for a heavy plot or action this is not the book for you.

262Kassilem
Dez. 23, 2014, 6:22pm

As for my last goal: Be happy. I feel I am able to cross this goal out as well. Let me tell you why.

✔ 1. Finish my degree in Anthropology and graduate
✔ 2. Finish and present my undergraduate research
✔ 3. Apply and get accepted into the Peace Crops
4. Study for and take the GRE (Being moved to Spring 2015)
✔ 5. Get to the gym four times a week
✔ 6. Pay off my car
✔ 7. Finish my cross-stitch
✔ 8. Finish my first novel and get a good start on my second
✔ 9. Read 75 books
✔ 10. Be happy

I learned this past week that my half-brother's half-brother, Steven, has cancer. He is currently spending the holidays in the hospital undergoing intensive chemotherapy. He's 25 years old and does not deserve to have his life on the line like this. I do not personally know Steven, but watching my half-brother's go through the pain of watching Steven be in pain is painful for me.

(As an aside, this year has been fraught with pain and trauma for many many people I know. I really really hope that next year will bring happier times)

Thinking about it all this week brought me back to the summer a year ago where I interned at the Coroner's Office. I learned a very important lesson there as I watched so many corpses pass through that office: you never know when you're going to die. Learning about Steven has pulled that to the forefront of my mind again.

Yes, you never know when you'll suddenly be yanked from this short life. And because of that, it is important to live our lives to the fullest we can and to be happy doing it. It is wrong to work towards being happy if the working towards that goal makes you miserable. Instead, work towards something fulfilling but be happy in the process as well.

I have been striving to do this ever since I left the Coroner's Office. Sometimes I lose sight of it. I can get caught up in school and life. But overall, I have decided that YES, I have succeeded in being happy this year as I've worked through all ten of those goals I made in January.

And because you do never know when the end might come, do yourself a favor and make a goal for 2015: to be happy. :)

263ronincats
Bearbeitet: Dez. 23, 2014, 10:01pm

Wise words, Melissa!

It's Chrismas Eve's eve, and so I am starting the rounds of wishing my 75er friends the merriest of Christmases or whatever the solstice celebration of their choice is.

264saraslibrary
Dez. 23, 2014, 10:12pm

>263 ronincats: Very cute kitty Christmas pic! :)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year's, Melissa! Congrats on making all your goals this year. And thanks for sharing the touching story with us. I wish the best for Steven.

265scaifea
Dez. 24, 2014, 9:32am

Love your thoughts on mortality and happiness, Melissa. Wishing you and yours a very happy holiday!

266rosylibrarian
Dez. 24, 2014, 11:51am

267DeltaQueen50
Dez. 24, 2014, 1:51pm

Have a wonderful holiday season, Melissa.

268Kassilem
Dez. 24, 2014, 2:10pm

Thank you all! I hope everyone has a happy holidays!

269lkernagh
Dez. 24, 2014, 9:00pm

>249 Kassilem: - Congratulations! Well done!

>262 Kassilem: - Wonderful words of wisdom.

I have enjoyed following your reading - and pretty much everything else - in 2014. Stopping by now to wish you happy holiday season and all the best in 2015!

270drachenbraut23
Dez. 25, 2014, 12:56pm



Merry Christmas Melissa and congrats to your graduation! Well done! I hope that 2015 will carry on as wonderful for you!

271inge87
Dez. 25, 2014, 4:28pm



Merry Christmas!

272Kassilem
Dez. 27, 2014, 4:22pm

Thanks Lori, Bianca & Jennifer!

273Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Dez. 27, 2014, 9:16pm

Well I think this is it for the Bingo Challenge. I doubt I will be able to fill up the last few tiles.

Edit: Turns out I spoke too soon. I didn't realize the book I was reading was written by someone so young. The last adult tile '1st book by favorite author wasn't bound to happen.

As for the YA bingo, I haven't cried due to a book in years and years so that was probably a bust from the very beginning. The other two... well they just didn't happen. For a challenge that I wasn't consciously trying to complete I think it turned out very well :) Here's the results one more time.



Regular Bingo
More than 500 pages: A Game of Thrones
Forgotten Classic: Wuthering Heights
Book that became a movie: Ender's Game
Published this year: Red Rising
Number in the title: Hunter-Gatherer Foraging: Five Simple Models
Written by someone under 30: Throne of Glass
Book with non-human characters: Throne of Jade
Funny Book: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Female Author: Night Broken
Book with a mystery: Fair Game
One-Word Title: Legion
Book of short stories: World War Z
Set on a different continent: Surviving the Extremes
Non-Fiction: When the World Calls
First book by a favourite author:
Heard about online: The Wood of Suicides
Best-selling book: MaddAddam
Based on a true story: A Searing Wind
Book at the bottom of TBR pile: Pride and Prejudice
Book my friend loves: Fifty Shades of Grey
Book that scares me: Oryx and Crake
More than 10 years old: The Wizard of Earthsea
Second book in a series: The Year of the Flood
Blue cover: Human Variation



YA Bingo
Book with female heroine: Once We Were
Book set in a high school: The Realm of Possibility
Last of a trilogy: The Forever Song
Book with a color in the title:
First book in series: Changers Book One: Drew
Book set in the future: Starters
Book with a break-up: Wide Awake
Book without a love triangle: The Eternity Cure
Book that became a movie: Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist
Book set in Paris:
Book set in the past: Love is the Higher Law
Book with magic: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
Book set in summer: Coraline
Book with a dragon: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Book that made you cry:
Graphic novel: A Bride's Story, Vol. 5
Book based on a myth: The Coldest Girl in Coldtown
Classic YA: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Book with a Lion, Witch or Wardrobe: Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince
Book with an incredible fight scene: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Book heard about online: Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians
Book set in another world: Wyrms
Book with epic love story: How They Met and Other Stories
Book with music: Where She Went

274Kassilem
Dez. 27, 2014, 9:28pm



110. Throne of Glass - Sarah J. Mass
Genre: High Fantasy
Pages: 432
Rating: 4 Stars
(TBR)

Summary:
In a land without magic, where the king rules with an iron hand, an assassin is summoned to the castle. She comes not to kill the king, but to win her freedom. If she defeats twenty-three killers, thieves, and warriors in a competition, she is released from prison to serve as the king's champion. Her name is Celaena Sardothien. The Crown Prince will provoke her. The Captain of the Guard will protect her. But something evil dwells in the castle of glass--and it's there to kill. When her competitors start dying one by one, Celaena's fight for freedom becomes a fight for survival, and a desperate quest to root out the evil before it destroys her world.

Thoughts:
This book was better than I thought it would be. It was the book cover that made me try the book and I've been burned multiple times before where I hoped for a great book because of the cover art. There's a reason that so many people saw to not judge a book by it's cover and I know the truth of it. So I wasn't expecting much. However it surprised me. It's not a phenomenal book but it was entertaining. I think I can see a love triangle forming and Celaena seemed out of character sometimes but otherwise I enjoyed "listening" to this book. I've already added the next book in the series to my TBR list.

Favorite Quote:
“No. I can survive well enough on my own— if given the proper reading material.”

275rosylibrarian
Dez. 28, 2014, 9:16am

>274 Kassilem: I am hoping to get to this series in 2015. I saw the author at a book festival and she seemed like someone whose book I would want to read, ha ha.

276saraslibrary
Dez. 28, 2014, 3:31pm

Wow, you got quite a few bingo's there! :) Good job!

277Kassilem
Dez. 29, 2014, 7:00pm

>275 rosylibrarian: :) I'm sure you'll like it when you get to it!

>276 saraslibrary: Thanks Sara!

278Kassilem
Dez. 31, 2014, 11:54pm



111. The House of the Four Winds - Mercedes Lackey & James Mallory
Genre: High Fantasy, Gender Bender
Pages: 304
Rating: 3 Stars
(New)

Summary:
The rulers of tiny, impoverished Swansgaard have twelve daughters and one son. While the prince’s future is assured, his twelve sisters must find their own fortunes. Disguising herself as Clarence, a sailor, Princess Clarice intends to work her way to the New World. When the crew rebels, Clarice/Clarence, an expert with rapier and dagger, sides with the handsome navigator, Dominick, and kills the cruel captain. Dominick leads the now-outlawed crew in search of treasure in the secret pirate haven known as The House of Four Winds. They encounter the sorceress Shamal, who claims Dominick for her own—but Clarice has fallen hard for Dominick and won’t give him up without a fight.

Thoughts:
My last book of 2014! It was entertaining book, with some action and romance. The romance was foreshadowed throughout the whole book which was kind of annoying and predictable, but there were spots in the book where you're not sure it will work out. Shamal really irritated me but I think that had a lot to so with how the narrator voiced her character. Besides, she's the villain - she's suppose to be irritating. If you like books about the sea and sailing with some fantasy mixed in this may be a book you might be interested in.

279Kassilem
Jan. 1, 2015, 1:00am

Reading Stats: December

Books: 9
Pages: 3,278

Format:
Dead Tree: 5
Audiobook: 4

Category:
TBR: 2
New: 5
Off My Shelves: 1
Textbook: 1

Stars:
4 Stars: 5
3 Stars: 4

Time Range:
2000-2009: 3
2010-2014: 6

Genres:
High Fantasy: 4
Urban Fantasy: 3
Gothic Fantasy: 1
Gender Bender: 1
Anthology: 1
Non-Fiction: 1
Science: 1

Graphic Novels read: 1 ('GN count' Thread can be found HERE)

280Kassilem
Jan. 1, 2015, 1:13am

Reading Stats: 2014

Books: 111
Pages: 43,177

January - 10 books / 2,708 pages
February - 5 books / 1,910 pages
March - 5 books / 1,931 pages
April - 6 books / 2,151 pages
May - 13 books / 5,752 pages
June - 15 books / 5,020 pages
July - 9 books / 4,738 pages
August - 20 books / 7,549 pages
September - 10 books / 2,936 pages
October - 6 books / 2,148 pages
November - 3 books / 3,056 pages
December - 9 books / 3,278 pages

~ 2.1 books per week
~ 830 pages per week

Format:
Dead Tree: 56
Audiobook: 55

Category:
TBR: 53
New: 16
Rereads: 11
Off Bookshelf: 5
Walk By-Pick Up: 12
Club/Group Reads: 1
Early Reviewer: 6
Textbooks: 7

Stars:
5 Stars: 14
4 Stars: 48
3 Stars: 43
2 Stars: 5
1 Stars: 1

Time Range:
1810-1819: 1
1840-1849: 1
1860-1869: 1
1870-1879: 1
1890-1899: 1
1900-1910: 1
1920-1929: 1
1940-1949: 1
1960-1969: 1
1980-1989: 3
1990-1999: 6
2000-2009: 34
2010-2014: 59

Genres:
Epic Fantasy: 16
Urban Fantasy: 16
High Fantasy: 13
Science Fiction: 12
Non-Fiction: 11
Lit Classic: 10
Dystopia: 9
Romance: 7
Anthropology: 6
Mystery: 6
Gothic Fantasy: 5
Gothic Fiction: 5
Reference: 4
Thriller: 4
Anthology: 4
Science: 4
Historical Fiction: 3
Memoir: 3
GLBT: 2
Gender Bender: 2
Psychology: 1
Philosophy: 1
History: 1
Politics: 1

5 Stars (14):
A Game of Thrones / Oryx and Crake / Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban / Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire / Words of Radiance / Skin Game / A Clash of Kings / Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix / Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire / Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows / Fool's Assassin / How They Met and Other Stories / Harry Potter Page to Screen / A Storm of Swords

Graphic Novels read: 98

281Kassilem
Jan. 1, 2015, 1:25am

Reading Stats: Year Comparisons

2014

Books: 111
Pages: 43,177

~ 2.1 books per week
~ 830 pages per week

Time Range: 1810-2014
Format: Dead Tree (56); Audiobook (55)
Top 3 categories: TBR (53); New (16); Rereads (11)
Top 4 genres: Epic Fantasy (16); Urban Fantasy (16); High Fantasy (13); Science Fiction (12)

Additional - Graphic Novels read: 98

***

2013

Books: 120
Pages: 50,171

~2.3 books per week
~962 pages per week

Time Range: 1870s-2013
Format: Dead Tree (60); Audiobook (60)
Top 3 categories: TBR (41); Walk By-Pick Up (24); Textbook (17)
Top 4 genres: Non-Fiction (32); Epic Fantasy (18); Urban Fantasy (15); Anthropology (15)

Additional - Graphic Novels read: 82

***

2012

Books: 138
Pages: 62,775

~2.6 books per week
~1,203 pages per week

Time Range: 1910s - 2012
Format: Dead Tree (104); Audiobook (34)
Top 3 categories: Walk By-Pick Up (39); Rereads (33); TBR (22)
Top 4 genres: Epic Fantasy (28); GLBT (24); High Fantasy (19); Non-Fiction (18)

Additional - Graphic Novels read: 85

***

2011

Books: 82
Pages: 39,011

~1.6 books per week
~750 pages per week

Time Range: 1960s - 2011
Format: Dead Tree (73); Audiobook (9)
Top 3 categories: Walk By-Pick Up (28); TBR (22); Off Bookshelf (13)
Top 4 genres: Urban Fantasy (22); High Fantasy (21); Romance (17); Mystery (16)

Additional - Graphic Novels read: 226

282Kassilem
Jan. 1, 2015, 1:28am

Reading Stats: Challenges

Off the Shelve Challenge: 9/27
Best-21st-Fantasy Challenge: 12/25
Best 20th Fantasy Challenge: 23/75
BBC-List-of-Best-100 Challenge: 27/100

283Kassilem
Bearbeitet: Jan. 1, 2015, 1:34am

Thank you to everyone who has followed my thread this year. I have enjoyed the conversations and book talk immensely. If you would like to follow me to my 2015 thread please click here on Kassilem's (Melissa) 2015 Reading! I'd love to have you. :)

284saraslibrary
Jan. 2, 2015, 2:51am

Wow! How do you collect all that reading data? I'm in awe!

285Kassilem
Jan. 2, 2015, 12:57pm

I used to do it at the end of each month but that took hours so now I collect the data at the end of each month and compile it all together on a separate thread - My Stats page. I also have to do some when I initially review which is why I keep track of the genre, category, and page number. Then it's just a matter of pulling out certain info to compare :) I love to compare! :D

286saraslibrary
Jan. 3, 2015, 6:04pm

I was thinking there was this Super App or Program that would do all of that for you. Anyway, I always love seeing other's stats. I may start doing that this year. We'll see. Thanks! :)