What books speak to you spiritually?

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What books speak to you spiritually?

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1NativeRoses
Mrz. 21, 2007, 2:00pm

Every now and then i come across books that aren't mainly about spirituality, but are nonetheless, intensely spiritual. i was wondering what books speak to other people spiritually?

i'm reading Adrift in a Vanishing City by Vincent Czyz right now and it's definitely one of those books for me.

2Arctic-Stranger
Mrz. 21, 2007, 2:38pm

I just finished Veronica by Mary Gaitskill. I guess it is about the ugly side of self knowledge. I am not sure I can say it is "spiritual" in any traditional sense of the term, but it poked and prodded me in places usually reserved for more traditionally spiritual works.

3Dickison
Mrz. 22, 2007, 12:19am

As a science person that evolved from an agnostic with no interest in religion to one that has an intense interest in spirituality but still having no need for religion I found books like Mysticism: an Anthology by F. C. Happold very enlightening. It showed me there was something to this afterall without the baggage of dogma. Another book I read when much younger was Star Maker by Olaf Stapledon. It always stuck with me how these multiple consciousnesses sought the star maker, especially when gazing up at the stars and being awestruck with the beauty and wonder of it all.

Some others I liked were Jonathan Livingston Seagull and Conversations with God: An Uncommon Dialogue

4krevbot
Mrz. 26, 2007, 11:32pm

I read 1984 a while back and it showed me several things about the depravity and brokenness of man.

Also, Watchmen poses a very real and divisive idea about life and society. A friend and I debated the two sides of the final debate for several hours. Even if you aren't into comics, you need to read this.

5Osbaldistone
Bearbeitet: Mai 31, 2007, 11:05pm

Leonard Cohen's collection of poetry and song lyrics, Stranger Music, contains a section (Book of Mercy) of what I refer to as Cohen's Sacred Writings, gut wrenching, heart splitting prayers by someone desparate for God. Like his other writings, he doesn't pull any punches, and forces you to think about what belief's you've accepted without much question. His "You Who Question Souls" may be the perfect prayer for a child, by a father who has fallen short.

On the lighter side, I re-read Wind in the Willows every so often. I find something new every time I read it. I starts out with Martha (mole) busy cleaning house until she is drawn by the calling of God's creation up on the surface and, transformed into Mary, drops her duster and climbs up to bathe in the glory of it all. Throughout these simple, beautifully written tales, we find lessons about loyalty, friendship, optimism, joy, grace, bravery, and many other traits that we all hope we will exhibit when called upon.

Os.

6andyray
Jun. 21, 2007, 4:44am

try most any of emmett fox's books, but begin with "Sermon on the Mount." It brings a whole new joy to language.

There's a priest/writer/creator named Pierre Teilhard de Chardin who wrote excellent spiritual theosophy, including the concept of a "noosphere." Basically, Chardin wedded Catholicism to Mayahana Buddhism.

Try "Fire in the Universe or "The Phenonomen of Man"

Many people do not know that the early church (180-320 A,D. had some 60=plus gospels available to it, but settled for the four we now know. however, the gospels of Mary, Barabus I and II, Judas, and Thomas are easily available. There are others. The notable things about these gospels are they are contempory, circa 30-60 A.D. rather than beginning in circa 80 A.D. as the Big Four do. AND
they deal with Jesus' years between child and Messiah.The Gospel of Thomas has Jesus sounding rather Buddhistic (and who was that lobg-haired Nazerene that visited eastern India at that time???)

7nathanmattox Erste Nachricht
Jan. 10, 2008, 5:06pm

Nikos Kazantzakis writes with great spiritual depth and eloquence. My favorites are The Last Temptation of Christ, and St. Francis. On the St. Francis tip, I also have been profoundly touched by Christian Bobin's The Secret of Francis of Assisi.

8robpiso
Aug. 20, 2011, 2:18pm

Hi everybody!
Just found that page today:
http://www.plough.com/ebooks/index.html

9Ronman
Aug. 22, 2011, 5:37pm

The book that has spoken to me spiritually, besides the Bible. Would have to be Spiritual Depression by Lloyd Jones. He does a marvellous job of showing you that the gospel speaks to our every need, even deep depression and despondency. I'll always be thankful for this work.