StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

MARCH(Paperback) BY [Author]Brooks, Geraldine ( Feb-2006 ) (2005)

von Geraldine Brooks

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
6,1372651,246 (3.76)680
Die Autorin hat in diesem Buch die Lebensgeschichte einer der bedeutendsten amerikanischen Familien nachgezeichnet. Louisa May Alcott hat Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts das Leben ihrer Familie in dem autobiografisch gefärbten Roman "Little Women" ("Betty und ihre Schwestern": zuletzt BA 7/96) beschrieben. Dies Buch und die Tagebücher des Familienvaters Bronson Alcott bilden die Grundlage für den Roman. Aus der Ich-Perspektive erzählt ein idealistischer Prediger aus den Nordstaaten, der mit 40 Jahren als Feldgeistlicher in den Bürgerkrieg zieht, beseelt von der Vorstellung, an der Sklavenbefreiung mitwirken zu können. An der Realität des Krieges zerbricht er fast. Als er zufällig seine Jugendliebe wiedertrifft merkt er, dass er seinen Idealen nicht treu bleiben kann. Im 2. Teil des Romans wird seine Ehefrau die Erzählerin, die ans Krankenbett ihres verwundeten Mannes gerufen wird und feststellen muss, dass sein Lebenswille fast gebrochen ist. Brooks (vgl. a. BA 7/02; 10/02) schreibt wieder ungemein fesselnd, arbeitet ihre Charaktere gut aus und beschreibt die historischen Zusammenhänge gut. Empfehlenswert… (mehr)
  1. 121
    Kleine Frauen von Louisa May Alcott (infiniteletters, kiwiflowa, Booksloth)
  2. 50
    Sargassomeer von Jean Rhys (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Classic stories (Little Women/Jane Eyre) re-imagined through the experiences of characters who are important to the plot while being almost entirely unseen.
  3. 74
    Unterwegs nach Cold Mountain von Charles Frazier (1Owlette)
  4. 10
    American Bloomsbury von Susan Cheever (bibliothequaire)
    bibliothequaire: Gives an historical account of the life of Bronson Alcott (who was Brooks' inspiration for Mr. March) and the transcendentalist community in Concord.
  5. 11
    The Widow of the South von Robert Hicks (bnbookgirl)
  6. 22
    Property von Valerie Martin (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Another award winning work that sheds light on the full horror of the results of slavery.
  7. 12
    Im Herbst von Jeffrey Lent (1Owlette)
  8. 13
    Gilead. von Marilynne Robinson (Anonymer Nutzer)
  9. 03
    Wo die Helden schlafen ["Redemption Falls"] von Joseph O'Connor (1Owlette)
  10. 03
    Hester von Paula Reed (KatyBee)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.


Little Women tells a story of family whose husband and father is absent for a year, serving in the Civil War. This books fills in the blanks of that absent man.

This read started slow for me. I really was not feeling much of an attachment to the protagonist, Mr. March. However, as the story went on he became more vulnerable, thus more likable. As he is away from "his little women" he writes home often. In those letters he expresses how he misses them all, tells of his travels. What he leaves out is truly what this story is about. The horrors of war, the brutality of slavery, the loneliness that fills his heart and soul.

What I read in the Afterward is what upped this book to 4 stars. [a:Geraldine Brooks|211268|Geraldine Brooks|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1303284528p2/211268.jpg] reveals, that just as Alcott used inspiration from her own family, Brooks followed that thread and based Mr. March on Alcott's father, Bronson Alcott. Brooks researched Bronson's life, used his journals and manuscripts, to fill in the void of Mr. March in Little Women.

This is the 3rd book I have read by Brooks's and 2nd that I have enjoyed. More likely than not, I will continue to read her.
( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
I’m glad I stuck with this book. Early on, there was a plot twist that seemed wrong. Even the language used to convey inner monolog at that point didn’t seem to reflect how a person of the 19th century would think or express himself. In the end, though, this incident was integral to the entire plot, and in this way justified itself.
The idea of taking the family from Little Women and describing the experiences of the absent father, away as a chaplain in the Civil War, was a good one. The narrative also fills in the years before Alcott’s book opens. This involves imagining Marmee as a young woman, which the author does by modeling her on Jo, a decision for which there is some basis in the earlier novel. Alcott also never mentions the town the family lives in by name, but since we all know it was Concord, this gives the author room to bring in not only the fictional neighbors and relations from Alcott’s book but also such down-to-earth transcendentals as the triangle of Mr. and Mrs. Emerson and Henry Thoreau. Even John Brown passes through, fatefully for the family.
For me, the book took a turn for the better in the shorter Part Two, expressing at last Mrs. March’s point-of-view. Particularly effective is the retelling of some key incidents from her perspective, which turns out to be the opposite of her husband’s. In the end, it didn’t even matter to me whether the plot was plausible as something the paterfamilias of the March family would have experienced, much less the real-life Bronson Alcott. The tale even transcended the specifics of the Civil War, although the author had thoroughly researched the topic. It turns out to be about the effect of any war on the men who go off to fight and the women they leave behind and to whom with luck they return. One effective tool of the author is to contrast the narrative with the sanitized letters sent back home.
I read this book in parallel to Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery. Although they overlap in time, space, and topic, the contrast between the two couldn’t have been crasser. Brooks graphically recounts what Washington only hints. I suspect the reasons aren’t limited to having been written a century apart, but I’ll reflect more about that when I set down my thoughts on that other book.
One-third of the way into this book, it felt as if I would give it two stars if I were to finish it. But now I think it was a good read, so three stars it is. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
I'm not a Civil War buff, and I was not sure how well I would like this spin on one of my childhood favorites. It turned out to be surprisingly interesting, pitch perfect in tone, style, and spirit, and as far as I could tell, thoroughly researched. Most important of all, it did not "contaminate" Little Women in any way. It offered sometimes unexpected perspectives on the original novel on rare but welcome occasions. ( )
  Charon07 | Jul 16, 2021 |
> La Solitude du docteur March, de Geraldine Brooks
Dans ce roman-fleuve, qui est aussi un jeu de piste littéraire, Geraldine Brooks a eu la bonne idée de faire vivre de nouvelles aventures au héros des Quatre Filles du docteur March.
Dans ce roman-fleuve, qui est aussi un jeu de piste littéraire, Geraldine Brooks a eu la bonne idée de faire vivre de nouvelles aventures au héros des Quatre Filles du docteur March, le livre cultissime de Louisa May Alcott. Elle imagine la jeunesse de March au mitan du XIXe siècle, ses déambulations de colporteur, son séjour dans une plantation dirigée par un champion de l'esclavagisme, puis son retour dans le Massachusetts où il épousera Marmee et veillera sur ses quatre filles légendaires, avant de plonger dans l'enfer de la guerre de Sécession, aux côtés des abolitionnistes. Souffle épique, scénario à rebondissements, ce roman possède le panache des grandes sagas à l'américaine, ce qui lui a valu le prix Pulitzer en 2006. --L'Express
  Joop-le-philosophe | Feb 8, 2021 |
Really I give it 3.5 stars. Most of the book is in Mr. March (the absent father in Little Women--based on Bronson Alcott)voice; a small section at the end is told from Marmee's point of view.

The story follows March's experience in the Civil War (as imagined by Brooks), and his trying to come to terms with his involvement with John Brown, and what is responsibility is in terms of fighting slavery.

I liked reading about his and Marmee's life, as that is seen in Little Women purely through the eyes of Jo--it's interesting to imagine them as adults. In Little Women, it was often mentioned that Marmee had to work very hard to control her temper--but that was always hard for me to believe. In 'March' you get a picture of a young woman driven by her involvement in the abolition movement. And here, it was a little hard for me to believe that she was as temperamental as she's portrayed. ( )
  giovannaz63 | Jan 18, 2021 |
Brooks is capable of strong writing about the natural world and nicely researched effects about the human one (on the eve of a battle, March sees ''the surgeon flinging down sawdust to receive the blood that was yet to flow''), but the book she has produced makes a distressing contribution to recent trends in historical fiction, which, after a decade or so of increased literary and intellectual weight, seems to be returning to its old sentimental contrivances and costumes.
 
Fascinating insight, don’t read if you’re a Little Women purist.
 
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Jo said sadly, "We haven't got father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never," but each silently added it, thinking of father far away, where the fighting was. ======= Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
For Dorleen and Cassie -

By no means little women.
Erste Worte
This is what I write to her: The clouds tonight embossed the sky.
Zitate
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
I am no longer eager, bold & strong.
All that is past;
I am ready not to do
At last, at last,
My half day's work is done,
And this is all my part.
I give a patient God
My patient heart.

(attributed to Cephas White- composed by an unnamed patient of Louisa May Alcott - transcribed in a letter to her aunt that is held among the rare manuscripts in the Library of Congress).
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (2)

Die Autorin hat in diesem Buch die Lebensgeschichte einer der bedeutendsten amerikanischen Familien nachgezeichnet. Louisa May Alcott hat Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts das Leben ihrer Familie in dem autobiografisch gefärbten Roman "Little Women" ("Betty und ihre Schwestern": zuletzt BA 7/96) beschrieben. Dies Buch und die Tagebücher des Familienvaters Bronson Alcott bilden die Grundlage für den Roman. Aus der Ich-Perspektive erzählt ein idealistischer Prediger aus den Nordstaaten, der mit 40 Jahren als Feldgeistlicher in den Bürgerkrieg zieht, beseelt von der Vorstellung, an der Sklavenbefreiung mitwirken zu können. An der Realität des Krieges zerbricht er fast. Als er zufällig seine Jugendliebe wiedertrifft merkt er, dass er seinen Idealen nicht treu bleiben kann. Im 2. Teil des Romans wird seine Ehefrau die Erzählerin, die ans Krankenbett ihres verwundeten Mannes gerufen wird und feststellen muss, dass sein Lebenswille fast gebrochen ist. Brooks (vgl. a. BA 7/02; 10/02) schreibt wieder ungemein fesselnd, arbeitet ihre Charaktere gut aus und beschreibt die historischen Zusammenhänge gut. Empfehlenswert

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.76)
0.5 6
1 27
1.5 6
2 98
2.5 26
3 411
3.5 117
4 642
4.5 71
5 365

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 163,131,151 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar