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Rules of Civility: A Novel von Amor Towles
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Rules of Civility: A Novel (2012. Auflage)

von Amor Towles (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
4,0362652,335 (4.02)1 / 270
A chance encounter with a handsome banker in a jazz bar on New Year's Eve 1938 catapults Wall Street secretary Katey Kontent into the upper echelons of New York society, where she befriends a shy multi-millionaire, an Upper East Side ne'er-do-well, and a single-minded widow.
Mitglied:AngelaGPrudhomme
Titel:Rules of Civility: A Novel
Autoren:Amor Towles (Autor)
Info:Penguin Books (2012), Edition: Reprint, 368 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Informationen

Eine Frage der Höflichkeit: Roman von Amor Towles

Kürzlich hinzugefügt vonprivate Bibliothek, mennelle, Arina8888, ecb06c, jenniferw88, jilld17, blueraven57
  1. 71
    Der große Gatsby von F. Scott Fitzgerald (Cecilturtle)
  2. 50
    Abbitte von Ian McEwan (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Atonement, like Rules of Civility, paints a picture of events that instantly turn characters' worlds upside down. Also set in the 1930s, it highlights the lingering opulence of the age and how that can disappear amid tragedy.
  3. 10
    Schwester Carrie von Theodore Dreiser (sidiki)
  4. 11
    The Glass Room von Simon Mawer (trav)
    trav: Slightly different time period and tone, but the writing is very similar as are the dynamics. Both Rules of Civility and The Glass Room are very well written time-period books.
  5. 11
    Jahrmarkt der Eitelkeit von William Makepeace Thackeray (Limelite)
    Limelite: Another look at an ambitious woman making her own way in the world and with commentary on the society of her times.
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» Siehe auch 270 Erwähnungen/Diskussionen

Rounded up to 3.5 stars.

I have to admit that I had this book on my to read list for years and then took it off for some reason or another and then when I found it in my Little Free Library I was glad.

It took a few chapters for me to understand how this book works because of the no quotation marks throughout the book and the long dashes sometimes before conversations but it was an interesting read.

I love the 30s in New York and Katey's friends and life especially back then when New York was full of jazz clubs and romping around New York.

What I didn't understand and I passed over was the last chapter which was all in italics about "King." It made no sense to me and who "King" was. ( )
  sweetbabyjane58 | Jan 10, 2022 |
The trouble with having a story start, and then taking up 30 years before that, is that certain details learned from the present/future can just hang there, in wait, while you read the entire rest of the story. I suppose learning early on who she ends up marrying is a precaution against becoming too attached to any of the others, but the knowledge almost weighed on me. My hopeful little heart would start thinking, 'this is going well', or 'that's sweet', 'maybe they'll end up together!' only to be entirely dashed every time I recalled that *they don't*. I didn't know how, or why, but they don't! I suppose it's more of a 'coming of age' story than a love story, but there is still quite a bit of romance. And all with men she doesn't end up with. It might not bother another reader at all, but wondering what would end up keeping each relationship from working out felt sort of ominous and stressful to me. Other than that though, I quite enjoyed it! It's well written and compelling. I may read it again someday, and I believe I would enjoy it more the second time, already knowing the reasons and no longer waiting, in suspense, for the axe to fall that will doom their relationship. Also, I hadn't read much based in the States during the late 1930s, and I enjoyed the peek into that time. This story did not necessarily go the way I would have liked best, but, somehow, it had an integrity that forced me to respect it anyway. After all, life doesn't always go the way I want it to either, but I couldn't subtract a star over it. ( )
  JorgeousJotts | Dec 3, 2021 |
Not nearly as good as "A Gentleman in Moscow". I did not for one second find the main character "Katey" the least bit believable. A working-class girl from immigrant parents who schools the rich and elite on Thoreau and Dickens. The New York milieu of the 1930's is fun and comes alive however, and Towles writes beautifully. Nice to see his progression as a writer as it moved upward. ( )
  Octavia78 | Nov 28, 2021 |
I read Towles' second novel, A Gentleman in Moscow, first, and I was blown away. It is perfect--not almost perfect--actually, perfect. It may be the most satisfying piece of fiction I have ever read. Rules of Civility is also wonderful, but it lacks the intricate plotting that results in A Gentleman is Moscow's wonderful ending. However, it displays the same insight into a large cast of characters, each of whom we come to know and admire for their depth. The protagonist, Katey Kontent (what an odd name...) is a young woman in New York City who moves from the typing pool to the staff of a new magazine, and both workplaces are convincingly portrayed. But it is her interactions with a series of men and with her female friends and acquaintances that drives the story forward. Everything is set in a shining New York of 1938-1940 and the author's love of the city really shows. I guess this book could be compared with The Great Gatsby in some ways, but it isn't as poetic--although Towles is a great stylist--and it is a lot longer, although there is never a single page without interest. Towles tells his story in short bursts, and no scene runs too long. Unlike A Gentleman in Moscow's premise--an aristocrat is sentenced to perpetual house arrest in Moscow's best hotel for decades--nothing in Rules of Civility's description would have drawn me to read it. But having been so impressed with the later novel, I dived into this one, finished it in two days, and am looking forward to his third novel, The Lincoln Highway, which will be delivered in two days. Highly, highly recommended. ( )
  datrappert | Nov 24, 2021 |
I call this a slice-of-life book. It is the story of a young women, Katey Kontent, who, in 1938, lives in New York City and works as a secretary. The book opens in the 1960's, when Katey and her husband, attending a photo exhibit, see photos of a man, Tinker Grey, who played a significant role in Katey's life in 1938. The rest is flashback. The book is largely about the Manhattan elite during the end of the Depression, seen through Katey's eyes.

This is the 3rd book I've read by Amor Towles. Anything he writes will keep my attention, and it certainly is an excellent book. For, me, however, this book is not as strong of a story as 'A Gentleman in Moscow', and it's a bit darker. That said, it is beautifully written, and well worth reading. ( )
  peggybr | Nov 4, 2021 |
In Towles’s first novel, “Rules of Civility,” his clever heroine, who grew up in Brooklyn as “Katya,” restyles herself in 1930s Manhattan as the more clubbable “Katey,” aspiring to all-American inclusion. As World War II gears up, raising the economy from bust to boom, Katey’s wit and charm lift her from a secretarial pool at a law firm to a high-profile assistant’s perch at a flashy new Condé Nast magazine. One night at the novel’s outset touches off the chain reaction that will produce both Katey’s career and her husband, and define her entire adult life. She’s swept into the satin-and-cashmere embrace of the smart set — blithe young people with names like Dicky and Bitsy and Bucky and Wallace — with their Oyster Bay mansions, their Adirondack camps, their cocktails at the St. Regis and all the fog of Fishers Island.
hinzugefügt von jimcripps | bearbeitenNew York Times, Liesl Schillinger (Aug 12, 2011)
 
If there's a problem, it's this: the parallels with Breakfast at Tiffany's are perhaps a little too overt (glamorous but down-at-heel girl falls in love with wealthy but mysterious benefactor). But that's not exactly a complaint. This is a flesh-and-blood tale you believe in, with fabulous period detail. It's all too rare to find a fun, glamorous, semi-literary tale to get lost in.
hinzugefügt von souloftherose | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Viv Goskrop (Jul 15, 2011)
 
Manhattan in the late 1930s is the setting for this saga of a bright, attractive and ambitious young woman whose relationships with her insecure roommate and the privileged Adonis they meet in a jazz club are never the same after an auto accident.
hinzugefügt von theeclecticreview | bearbeitenKirkus Review (Jun 1, 2011)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Amor TowlesHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Lowman, RebeccaErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Payette, MaggieUmschlaggestalterCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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On the night of October 4th, 1966, Val and I, both in late middle age, attended the opening of Many Are Called at the Museum of Modern Art—the first exhibit of the portraits taken by Walker Evans in the late 1930s on the New York City subways with a hidden camera.
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As a quick aside, let me observe that in moments of high emotion -- whether they're triggered by anger or envy, humiliation or resentment -- if the next thing you're going to say makes you feel better, then it's probably the wrong thing to say. This is one of the finer maxims that I've discovered in life. And you can have it, since it's been of no use to me.
The 1930s . . .
what a grueling decade that was.
I was sixteen when the Depression began, just old enough to have had all my dreams and expectations duped by the effortless glamour of the twenties. It was as if America launched the Depression just to teach Manhattan a lesson.
It turned out to be a book of Washingtonia. The inscription on the front page indicated it was a present to Tinker fro his mother on the occasion of his fourteenth birthday. The volume had all the famous speeches and letters arranged in chronological order, but it led off with an aspirational list composed by the founder in his teenage years:
Rules of Civility & Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation. . . . There were 110 of them! And over half were underlined – one adolescent sharing another's enthusiasm for propriety across a chasm of 150 years. It was hard to decide which was sweeter – the fact that Tinker's mother had given it to him, or the fact that he kept it at hand.
Squirrels scattered before us among the tree trunks and yellow-tailed birds zipped from branch to branch. The air smelled of sumac and sassafras and other sweet-sounding words.
Right from the first, I could see a calmness in you – that sort of inner tranquility that they write about in books, but that almost no one seems to possess. I was wondering to myself: how does she do that? And I figured it could only come from having no regrets – from having made choices with . . . such poise and purpose. It stopped me in my tracks a little. And I just couldn't wait to see it again.
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A chance encounter with a handsome banker in a jazz bar on New Year's Eve 1938 catapults Wall Street secretary Katey Kontent into the upper echelons of New York society, where she befriends a shy multi-millionaire, an Upper East Side ne'er-do-well, and a single-minded widow.

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