StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Limonov von Emmanuel Carrère
Lädt ...

Limonov (Original 2011; 2012. Auflage)

von Emmanuel Carrère

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
5512132,255 (3.93)18
"A thrilling page-turner that also happens to be the biography of one of Russia's most controversial figures This is how Emmanuel Carrère, the magnetic journalist, novelist, filmmaker, chameleon, describes his subject: "Limonov is not a fictional character. There. I know him. He was a rogue in Ukraine; an idol of the Soviet underground under Brezhnev; a bum, then a multimillionaire's valet in Manhattan; a fashionable writer in Paris; a lost soldier in the Balkan wars; and now, in the chaotic ruins of postcommunist Russia, the elderly but charismatic leader of a party of young desperados. He sees himself as a hero; you might call him a scumbag: I suspend my judgment on the matter. It's a dangerous life, an ambiguous life: a real adventure novel. It is also, I believe, a life that says something. Not just about him, Limonov, not just about Russia, but about all our history since the end of World War II." So Limonov isn't fictional--but he might as well be. This pseudo-biography isn't a novel, but it reads like one: from Limonov's grim childhood; to his desperate, comical, ultimately successful attempts to gain the respect of Russia's literary intellectual elite; to his emigration to New York, then to Paris; to his return to the motherland. Limonov could be read as a charming picaresque. But it could also be read as a troubling counter-narrative of the second half of the twentieth century, one that reveals a violence, an anarchy, a brutality that the stories we tell ourselves about progress tend to conceal"--… (mehr)
Mitglied:Gianfranco.Salmeri
Titel:Limonov
Autoren:Emmanuel Carrère
Info:Adelphi (2012), Perfect Paperback
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Details

Limonow von Emmanuel Carrère (2011)

Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Eduard Limonov is one of those people who are far more interesting, the LESS you know about them. I have given the book three stars because its deficiencies cannot be blamed upon the writer, or translator, as much as the subject.

Upon a brief acquaintance, Limonov comes across as an intriguing character: on further inspection, he becomes a narcissistic creature. I couldn't begin to guess as to whether he believes ANY of his 'principles'; they are certainly easily shed when a new chance to gurn in front of the media appears.

My advice about this book: don't bother, there are much more exciting people about whom to read. ( )
  the.ken.petersen | Mar 28, 2021 |
Non è facile rendermi simpatico un fascista.
Con questa biografia dello scrittore e militante politico russo Eduard Veniaminovich Savenko, in arte Limonov, forse Emmanuel Carrère è quello che più ci è andato vicino.
Certo, Eduard Limonov non è esattamente un fascista classico, gli mancano i tratti dei stereotipi dei fascisti che siamo abituati a vedere in giro e ad odiare: razzismo, antisemitismo, omofobia. Ne mantiene però altri, come il forte sentimento nazionalista, una smisurata stima di se e una sfrontatezza che spesso sconfina nell'arroganza.
Eppure Carrère ci fa capire che la vicenda umana di Limonov non può certamente essere ridotta al suo solo fascismo: la faccenda è più complicata di così, come non si stanca mai di ripetere lo scrittore francese per tutto l'arco della narrazione.
Dall'Ucraina a New York, Parigi, la Jugoslavia devastata dalla guerra, la Mosca Post Sovietica, l'Asia Centrale con i suoi paesaggi mozzafiato, Eduard Limonov non rimane mai fermo, la sua mente brillante sembra non accontentarsi mai di ciò che riesce a ottenere, non può accontentarsi mai.
Un ego strabordante, geniale e controverso che di sicuro non lascia indifferenti, complice anche la splendida scrittura di Emmanuel Carrère che ogni tanto compare in questa biografia con le sue considerazioni, le sue opinioni che impreziosiscono il racconto di una vicenda umana già ricca di avvenimenti.
Da leggere.
( )
  JoeProtagoras | Jan 28, 2021 |
Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia
by Emmanuel Carrère,

Well that pretty much sums it up on one foul swoop except that it doesn't, at all, in any way shape or form.

The book begins with this quote:
"Whoever wants the Soviet Union back has no brain. Whoever doesn't miss it has no heart". - Vladimir Putin

One of things I witness almost daily is the vilification of Vladimir Putin in the Western media. Don't get me going! It distresses me much because this is what the West does again and again. Like the passion for regime change and the goddamn fucking awful consequences that always ensue. Look what has happened since the deposing of Saddam Hussein (good guy one day, bad guy the next), Taliban, Al Qaieda and now Isis. Well fucking done Blair and Bush.

I see the daily vilification of Isis too, though that doesn't distress me as much. The problem we have is that the West doesn’t cope with complexity so everything has to be simplified to moronic fundamentalist christian levels. Valdimir Putin is a fucking hero in Russia and yet our dimwit fucking masters here would have us believe that he is a bad person. I'm sure they have already told you that he doesn't brush his teeth every day nor say his prayers. Well Tony Fucking Blair is now a Catholic and I bet he prays every fucking day, as well he should given how much blood is on his hands, that bastard. Don't get me started!

People want to know who is radicalising the Muslims? Is that a fucking joke? You don't for a moment think it could have the slightest thing to do with 15 years of illegal war with the good guys "lighting them up", the endless drone killings, their towns and cities a mass of rubble, not to mention the centuries of our meddling in their politics and economies and did I mention regime change? What, you thought it was Muslim clerics? Now that is a fucking joke.

The problem with all this simplification or vilification is that we haven't a fucking clue what is really going on in the world around us and why they are shooting us in the streets of Paris? Oh yeah, they are evil guys, bad guys, a death cult you say? Well where do they get the guns? Who is selling them weapons? I see them riding in convoys of brand new Toyota Landcruisers, who is selling them the vehicles? Do those vehicles have a warranty? Well, do they? Who underwrites that?

What's that? you can read all my fucking emails and text messages and see everything that I look at on the Internet and yet you cannot tell us who is selling them the guns they are using to kill us? What's that? it's complicated you say? I might find it hard to understand the complexities of the situation. Don't get me fucking started!

Liminov, who the fuck is Limonov? Limonov was a thief, drug addict, wife beater, queer, bum boy, liar, convict, traitor and did I say thief? Well, that is who Limonov is and that's probably all the West can cope with. Remember the polonium poisoning and the journalist assassinations (you know all that bad shit that Putin ordered). Well, all that is in there too. The simple fact is that Limonov is a hero and an artist and all those other things too.

It is not a slot that we have in the West, you know how it is, you are either George Clooney or a mass murderer or a nobody. That's about as complicated as we get. Hence the current obsession with comic book heroes who may occasionally consider a moral conundrum for about 3 seconds before hitting somebody. Don't get me fucking started!

I hate to tell you this now, but nothing is straightforward, just like everything on the Internet is a lie, so everything about Russia or Russians is just too fucking complicated to even begin to understand. If you want to know about Liminov you'd have to read this book.

Don't get me started!

Footnote: Read this first:
http://williamblum.org/aer/read/128
(It's a bit like drinking water to clear your palate before tasting something sublime. If the water tastes off you should just go straight to bed and not bother with the book, have a little lie down until you feel better) ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
EDUARD LIMONOV ES DE ESAS FIGURAS QUE NO PASAN DESAPERCIBIDAS. LIMONOV FUE UN ÍDOLO DE LOS SUBURBIOS SOVIÉTICOS, AL MANDO DE LEONID BREZHNEV; EL MAYORDOMO DE UN MILLONARIO EN MANHATTAN; UN ESCRITOR EN PARÍS Y, RECIENTEMENTE, EL LÍDER CARISMÁTICO DEL PARTIDO NACIONAL BOLCHEVIQUE EN RUSIA. SE ANALIZA EL VIAJE DE ESTE SINGULAR PERSONAJE A TRAVÉS DE LOS TRES PAÍSES: SUS CAÍDAS, SU LUCHA Y, TAMBIÉN, SUS TRIUNFOS. ( )
  Elenagdd | Jun 13, 2019 |
Carrère, Emmanuel (2011). Limonov. Milano: Adelphi. 2012. ISBN 9788845973291. Pagine 356. 11,99 €

I miei lettori – qualcuno più dei 25 che con ironica modestia si attribuiva Manzoni, a dare retta alle statistiche di WordPress – e soprattutto il diretto interessato sanno che ho, in un paio di occasioni (qui e qui), reso nota su questo blog la mia insofferenza per lo stile di conduzione di Attilio Scarpellini della trasmissione mattutina di Rai Radio3 Qui comincia.

E invece qui voglio ringraziarlo pubblicamente per aver segnalato questo libro nella trasmissione dello scorso 3 gennaio 2013 (se volete, potete ascoltare il podcast).

Avevo già incontrato una volta Carrère nelle mie letture, e ancora prima nelle mie visioni cinematografiche. Carrère, infatti, è l’autore di L’avversario (L’adversaire), da cui è stato tratto nel 2002 l’omonimo bellissimo film di Nicole Garcia interpretato da un grandissimo Daniel Auteuil.

Jean-Marc Faure vive in Franca Contea, nei pressi del confine con la Svizzera, assieme alla moglie Christine e i piccoli Alice e Vincent. Da parecchi anni finge di essere ciò che non è: un medico e ricercatore presso l’OMS di Ginevra. Anche i genitori, i suoceri, gli amici e tutti quelli che lo conoscono lo pensano tale, e lui, apparentemente insospettabile, gode di una stima indiscussa.
In realtà ha smesso di dare esami al secondo anno di Medicina, e da allora ha mentito trascinando se stesso e gli altri in un vortice della menzogna da cui non può ormai più uscire. Ogni mattina parte “per il lavoro”, salvo poi sostare per ore in parcheggi fuori mano o affittare stanze d’albergo quando simula improvvise partenze per l’estero, o farsi vedere a Ginevra nei rari casi in cui ha dovuto concordare un appuntamento. Nei frequenti momenti di solitudine cresce in lui il tormento per una vita fittizia che comincia a condurlo, già fragile ab origine, nel baratro della pazzia.
I pochi soldi che è riuscito ad ottenere con la truffa (prevalentemente prestiti) stanno volgendo al termine e la moglie comincia ad avvicinarsi alla verità. Jean-Marc, allora, decide: un giorno di gennaio stermina la famiglia, qualche ora più tardi sopprime i genitori e durante la sera tenta di uccidere anche l’amante Marianne. Poi, per completare il folle disegno, dà fuoco alla casa e ingerisce barbiturici scaduti. Nello sconcerto generale vengono rinvenuti i cadaveri mentre i pompieri portano in salvo lo sventurato pseudo-dottore. (Wikipedia)

Per quanto agghiacciante (anche climaticamente) sia la trasposizione cinematografica, la storia vera raccontata da Emmanuel Carrère lo è ancora di più. E lo è, secondo me, non tanto perché – a differenza di quanto accade nel film – Carrère con cambia nessun nome e nessuna circostanza, ma aderisce con scrupoli da giornalista investigativo a ogni dettaglio, che cerca di ricostruire e chiarire quanto meglio è possibile, ma soprattutto perché “entra” personalmente nella storia che racconta, raccontandoci che cosa stava facendo quando ha sentito per la prima volta del tragico fatto di cronaca, confrontando la sua vita ed esperienza personale con le vicende narrate (come quando si mette un oggetto conosciuto vicino a un manufatto archeologico e a uno scheletro di dinosauro per farcene apprezzare meglio le dimensioni), seguendo da vicino il processo. Diamogli la parola.

Il 9 gennaio 1993, Jean-Claude Romand ha ucciso moglie, figli e genitori. Poi ha tentato, invano, di suicidarsi. L’indagine ha rivelato che non era un medico come aveva sempre sostenuto e, cosa ancor più difficile da credere, non era nient’altro. Mentiva da diciotto anni, ma la sua menzogna non copriva nulla. Quando stava per essere scoperto, ha preferito sopprimere tutte le persone di cui non avrebbe mai potuto reggere lo sguardo. E’ stato condannato all’ergastolo. Io sono entrato in contatto con lui, ho assistito al suo processo. Ho tentato di raccontare con precisione, giorno dopo giorno, questa vita di solitudine, d’impostura e d’assenza. Di immaginare cosa gli passava per la testa durante le lunghe ore vuote, senza progetti né testimoni, che avrebbe dovuto trascorrere al lavoro e invece passava nei parcheggi autostradali o nel boschi del Jura. Di capire che cosa, in un’esperienza umana tanto estrema, mi ha toccato cosi da vicino. E tocca, credo, ciascuno di noi. [dalla quarta di copertina]

Ecco, con Limonov Carrère realizza un’operazione simile. Eduard Limonov è anche lui una persona vera e vivente, non un personaggio da romanzo (qui sotto la vediamo quando, non più tardi del 31 dicembre 2012, viene arrestato dalla polizia russa in una manifestazione contro Putin).

L’arresto di Limonov, il 31 dicembre 2012 (radio3.rai.it)

Ma Carrère ne fa un ritratto iperrealistico, una statua più grande del vero. Penso che si possa inventare per questo libro il termine meta-iperrealismo, perché Ed Limonov stesso è un’invenzione di Eduard Savenko, un’invenzione prima biografica che letteraria. Bigger than life, si dice in inglese. E perché lo stesso Limonov è autore di oltre 50 volumi e biografo di sé stesso: e questo mi sembra tutt’altro che secondario. Anzi è probabilmente la vera sfida che ha stimolato Carrère: scrivere qualche cosa di nuovo e di diverso, se non di definitivo, su un uomo che di sé ha scritto (e vissuto) tutto e il suo contrario. Diamo, ancora una volta, la parola allo stesso Carrère:

Limonov […] è stato teppista in Ucraina, idolo dell’underground sovietico, barbone e poi domestico di un miliardario a Manhattan, scrittore alla moda a Parigi, soldato sperduto nei Balcani; e adesso, nell’immenso bordello del dopo comunismo, vecchio capo carismatico di un partito di giovani desperados. Lui si vede come un eroe, ma lo si può considerare anche una carogna: io sospendo il giudizio. Comunque, […] ho pensato che la sua vita romanzesca e spericolata raccontasse qualcosa, non solamente di lui, Limonov, non solamente della Russia, ma della storia di noi tutti dopo la fine della seconda guerra mondiale. [357]

Il libro è – secondo me – molto bello: si legge d’un fiato e la scrittura di Carrère mi piace. Mi piace anche la traduzione di Francesco Bergamasco, salvo che per 2 dettagli cui, da incorreggibile pedante, attribuisco la massima importanza: l’uso dell’orrendo e burocratico prosieguo (pos. 4465: eppure poteva scrivere “nel resto della serata”) e una curiosa frase in cui i pesci si puliscono asportandone le branchie [pos. 4653: non sarebbe stato più igienico e ragionevole "asportarne le interiora"? Che cosa aveva scritto Carrère?). La cosa migliore che potete fare è andarlo a leggere direttamente, lasciando perdere le mie elucubrazioni.

* * *

Nel caso invece siate rimasti qui: se gironzolate un po' su YouTube, le interviste a Carrère e al suo Limonov non mancano. Il 16 dicembre 2012 è anche stato intervistato da Fabio Fazio a Che tempo che fa?

Ma mi sembra più divertente sentire come the one and only Ed Limonov ha commentato il Premio Renaudot vinto da Carrère per il libro su di lui:

* * *

Qualche citazione (riferimento come sempre alle posizioni sul Kindle).

[…] questa storia dell’opposizione democratica in Russia è come l’arrocco nella dama: un espediente non contemplato dalle regole del gioco, che non ha mai funzionato e non funzionerà mai. [262]

Eduard non ne conosce altri: le famiglie di ufficiali e sottufficiali che abitano nel palazzo dell’NKVD, in via dell’Armata Rossa, si frequentano solo tra loro e hanno scarsa considerazione per i civili, individui frignoni e indisciplinati che si fermano senza preavviso in mezzo al marciapiede, costringendo a modificare la sua traiettoria il soldato che invece cammina con andatura regolamentare, costante e sostenuta: sei chilometri all’ora. Così camminerà Eduard sino alla fine dei suoi giorni. [445: anch'io, per quello che conta, ho fatto dei 6 km/h una regola di vita…]

Eduard capisce allora una cosa fondamentale, ossia che ci sono due categorie di persone: quelle che si possono picchiare e quelle che non si possono picchiare, non perché siano più forti o meglio allenate, ma perché sono pronte a uccidere. È questo il segreto, l’unico, e il bravo piccolo Eduard decide di passare nella seconda categoria: sarà un uomo che nessuno colpisce perché tutti sanno che è capace di uccidere. [537]

«Agisci con coraggio e decisione, senza aspettare che ci siano tutte le condizioni ideali, perché le condizioni ideali non esistono» [590]

Nel mondo dei «decadenti» di Char’kov, infatti, il genio ha il dovere di essere non soltanto misconosciuto ma anche avvinazzato, eccentrico, disadattato. [856]

Il grande adagio dell’epoca, equivalente al nostro «lavorare di più per guadagnare di più», era: «Noi facciamo finta di lavorare e loro fanno finta di pagarci». Non è uno stile di vita esaltante, ma comunque funziona: si tira avanti. Non ci sono pericoli reali, a meno che uno non sia un vero piantagrane. Tutti se ne sbattono di tutto e, chiusi in cucina, rifanno dalle fondamenta un mondo che, a meno di non chiamarsi Solženicyn, si è certi resterà immutato per secoli, perché la sua ragion d’essere è l’inerzia. [974]

Il fatto è che a Eduard non piacciono i culti di cui non sia lui il destinatario. [1257: ne conosco più d'uno…]

A Saltov nessuno ha mai visto né vedrà mai un posto come quello. Nessuno tra gli invitati dei Liberman ha la più pallida idea di che cosa sia Saltov. Lui solo conosce entrambi i mondi, ed è questa la sua forza. [1562]

Uno dei migliori ricordi della vita di Eduard è quello di avere inculato Tanja davanti alla televisione, alla faccia del profeta che arringava l’Occidente e ne stigmatizzava la decadenza. [1610]

Per come la vede Eduard, in amore c’è chi dà e chi riceve, e lui ritiene di aver già dato abbastanza. [1809]

[…] la botte schifosamente piena e la moglie completamente ubriaca […] [2265]

[…] penso che quest’idea – ripeto: «L’uomo che si ritiene superiore, inferiore o anche uguale a un altro non capisce la realtà» — rappresenti il vertice della saggezza e non basti una vita a farsene permeare, ad assimilarla, a interiorizzarla in modo che cessi di essere un’idea e plasmi invece il nostro modo di vedere e di agire in ogni situazione. [2522]

Si sono separati più volte, e più volte rimessi insieme, secondo il classico schema: né con te, né senza di te. [2618]

E non a George Orwell, ma a Pjatakov, un compagno di Lenin, si deve questa frase straordinaria: «Se il partito lo richiede, un vero bolscevico è disposto a credere che il nero sia bianco e il bianco nero». [2699]

[…] c’era dentro di lui un pagliaccio amaro e autolesionista che boicottava l’opera delle fate buone che si erano chinate sulla sua culla. [2787]

Se mi considero incapace di ogni violenza gratuita, riesco pure a immaginare facilmente – forse troppo – le ragioni o le concatenazioni di eventi che in altre epoche avrebbero potuto spingermi al collaborazionismo, allo stalinismo o alla rivoluzione culturale. Forse tendo anche troppo a chiedermi se fra i valori accettati senza discutere dal mio ambiente – i valori che le persone del mio tempo, del mio paese e della mia classe sociale giudicano irrinunciabili, eterni e universali – non possa essercene qualcuno che un giorno risulterà grottesco, scandaloso o semplicemente sbagliato. [3428]

I moldavi erano talmente poveri che sognavano di ridiventare romeni, il che è tutto dire. [3816] ( )
  Boris.Limpopo | Apr 29, 2019 |
Extremisten-Biografie "Limonow": Pussy Riots düsterer Vorgänger - Nationalbolschewist, Sex-Abenteurer, Selbstdarsteller: Der Schriftsteller Eduard Limonow ist eine der schillerndsten Figuren der russischen Politik und fordert mit provokanten Aktionen den Staat heraus. Eine Biografie widmet sich nun seinem Leben - voller Abscheu und Faszination.
 
“This deft, timely translation of French writer and filmmaker Carrère's sparkling 2011 biography of Eduard Limonov is an enthralling portrait of a man and his times. The subtitle is no exaggeration: Limonov, a prolific and celebrated author, cofounder of Russia's National Bolshevik Party, onetime coleader of the Drugaya Rossiya opposition movement, and current head of Strategy 31 (which organizes protests in Russia aimed at securing the right to peacefully assemble), has led an extraordinary life. Carrère suggests that Limonov's haphazard turns--from budding poet, disillusioned émigré, New York City butler, and Parisian literary rock star to Russian countercultural maverick, Putin opponent, and political prisoner--have been prompted by his drive for adventure and fame . . . Carrère's Limonov never dissolves in a mess of unfathomable contradictions. Instead, he emerges as a mirror through which the vortex of culture and politics in the late-Soviet and New Russian eras is reflected. In this astute, witty account, Limonov has found his ideal biographer. There are few more enjoyable descriptions of Russia today.”
hinzugefügt von davidgn | bearbeitenPublisher's Weekly
 
“There's an obsession that has always tormented Emmanuel Carrère and that has forced him to become the greatest living French author: to unearth his three demons [deception, savagery, loss], to drive them away, and, if possible, to reveal them to the world through books which prove themselves necessary . . . Limonov . . . is the human being who more than any other embodies Carrère's three demons and adds a crucial one of his own: the desire to challenge the world.”
hinzugefügt von davidgn | bearbeitenCorriere della sera, Marco Missiroli
 
“[Emmanuel Carrère] is probably the most important French writer you've never heard of.”
hinzugefügt von davidgn | bearbeitenThe Observer, Robert McCrum
 
“[An] addictively interesting narrative (nimbly translated by John Lambert) . . . the storytelling in Limonov is fast-paced and full of zest . . . The book grows in both excitement and absurdity as it charts Mr. Limonov's return to Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union and his bizarre transformation into an ultranationalist. His National Bolshevik Party makes bedfellows of anti-Semitic extremists, counterculture artists and other social misfits, and, for a time during Boris Yeltsin's incompetent presidency, Mr. Limonov believes he can seize power. Mr. Carrère presents him as a kind of farcical exemplum of a new Russia run by drunks and gangsters--except that he loses out again, this time to Vladimir Putin, who trumps him in brutality and demagoguery just as Brodsky once one-upped him in literary renown. Even when it comes to immoral self-interest, Mr. Limonov is second-best, a failure and a loser. In other words, Mr. Carrère suggests, a hero of our time.”
hinzugefügt von davidgn | bearbeitenThe Wall Street Journal, Sam Sacks
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Emmanuel CarrèreHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Francesco BergamascoÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hamm, ClaudiaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Lambert, JohnÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Vandenberghe, KatrienÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Vuyst, Katelijne DeÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

Ist enthalten in

Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
"Celui qui veut restaurer le communisme n'a pas de tête. Celui qui ne le regrette pas n'a pas de coeur."
Vladimir Poutine
Widmung
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Jusqu'à ce qu'Anna Politkovskaïa soit abattue dans l'escalier de son immeuble, le 7 octobre 2006, seuls les gens qui s'intéressaient de près aux guerres de Tchétchénie connaissaient le nom de cette jornaliste courageuse, opposante déclarée à la politique de Vladimir Poutine.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Klappentexte von
Originalsprache
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

"A thrilling page-turner that also happens to be the biography of one of Russia's most controversial figures This is how Emmanuel Carrère, the magnetic journalist, novelist, filmmaker, chameleon, describes his subject: "Limonov is not a fictional character. There. I know him. He was a rogue in Ukraine; an idol of the Soviet underground under Brezhnev; a bum, then a multimillionaire's valet in Manhattan; a fashionable writer in Paris; a lost soldier in the Balkan wars; and now, in the chaotic ruins of postcommunist Russia, the elderly but charismatic leader of a party of young desperados. He sees himself as a hero; you might call him a scumbag: I suspend my judgment on the matter. It's a dangerous life, an ambiguous life: a real adventure novel. It is also, I believe, a life that says something. Not just about him, Limonov, not just about Russia, but about all our history since the end of World War II." So Limonov isn't fictional--but he might as well be. This pseudo-biography isn't a novel, but it reads like one: from Limonov's grim childhood; to his desperate, comical, ultimately successful attempts to gain the respect of Russia's literary intellectual elite; to his emigration to New York, then to Paris; to his return to the motherland. Limonov could be read as a charming picaresque. But it could also be read as a troubling counter-narrative of the second half of the twentieth century, one that reveals a violence, an anarchy, a brutality that the stories we tell ourselves about progress tend to conceal"--

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Gespeicherte Links

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.93)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 5
2.5 4
3 21
3.5 15
4 59
4.5 13
5 30

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | "Gschäfterl" | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Early Reviewers | Wissenswertes | 156,940,275 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar