StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and…
Lädt ...

Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change (Original 2012; 2012. Auflage)

von Charles Duhigg (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
4,9681891,614 (3.88)83
Der US-amerikanische Wissenschaftsjournalist erklärt, wie gute, aber auch schlechte Gewohnheiten funktionieren. Dabei stützt er sich auf eine Vielzahl von neurobiologischen und psychologischen Studien sowie auf Interviews mit Wissenschaftlern und Führungskräften in amerikanischen Wirtschaftsunternehmen und kommt zu dem Schluss, dass sich unser Gehirn umerziehen lässt, dass man seine Gewohnheiten also auch ändern kann. Er zeigt, wie dies gelingen kann, wie man es z. B. schafft, mehr Sport zu treiben, effizienter zu arbeiten und gesünder zu leben; darüber hinaus geht es Duhigg auch um Möglichkeiten zur Änderung von Gewohnheiten in Gesellschaften und um die Frage, wie gute soziale Gewohnheiten eine Gesellschaft zusammenhalten. Eine mit ihren zwar anschaulichen, aber auch weit ausholenden Fallgeschichten streckenweise doch reichlich aufgeblähte Anleitung zum Umdenken und zur Selbstveränderung. (3) (Reinhold Heckmann) Der US-amerikanische Wissenschaftsjournalist erklärt, wie gute, aber auch schlechte Gewohnheiten funktionieren und zeigt, dass unser Gehirn umerzogen werden kann, dass Gewohnheiten sich also auch ändern lassen. (Reinhold Heckmann)… (mehr)
Mitglied:Rom71
Titel:Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change
Autoren:Charles Duhigg (Autor)
Info:Heinemann Educational Books (2012), 400 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Details

Die Macht der Gewohnheit: Warum wir tun, was wir tun von Charles Duhigg (2012)

Kürzlich hinzugefügt vonprivate Bibliothek, TaylanEvrenler, jnsp13, PatriciaCristina, LK_Khasa, plitzdom, PolyMath7483225, jobinsonlis, JGZuniga
  1. 00
    Mind Hacking: How to Change Your Mind for Good in 21 Days von Sir John Hargrave (nefitty)
  2. 00
    Mindset: The New Psychology of Success von Carol S. Dweck (stephenkoplin)
  3. 11
    Wie wir entscheiden: Das erfolgreiche Zusammenspiel von Kopf und Bauch von Jonah Lehrer (Anonymer Nutzer)
  4. 00
    Warum kaufen wir?: Die Psychologie des Konsums von Paco Underhill (trav)
  5. 00
    Switch von Chip Heath (Asumi)
  6. 00
    Barfuß in Manhattan: Mein ökologisch korrektes Abenteuer von Colin Beavan (mene)
    mene: In "The Power of Habit", it is described why people do things a certain way. The reason people buy so many things is also explained. "No Impact Man" is a good example of someone changing their habits (in a very extreme way). The author of "No Impact Man" also talks about why people buy so many things, among other things.… (mehr)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

This was interesting, but I pretty much got everything I wanted out of part 1. Parts 2 and 3 focus on "organizations" and "societies" but that stuff was pretty well represented in the examples in part 1. So it goes back to the library without me bothering to read beyond that.
  WeaselBox | May 16, 2021 |
Really interesting book and definitely worth reading, but a lot more long winded than it needed to be. ( )
  SGTCat | Feb 25, 2021 |
I found this book fascinating. A very readable book about the influence of habits on the individual level, organizational level, and on society as a while. This book is filled with great real world examples to help illustrate what we know about habits, how you can use this knowledge for improvement, and how this knowledge is being used on you everyday. Some of the material on how influencing habits is used in marketing to predict when you are "vulnerable" to marketing, knowing what you want, and how to get you to want something new were great even if a bit disconcerting. The author's main point throughout this book is that understanding how habits work contain a key to influencing behavior, both your own and those of others, on a personal and professional level.
( )
  SteveKey | Jan 8, 2021 |
Content Summary:
The Power of Habit is divided into three parts: 1) Habits of Individuals, 2) Habits of Successful Organizations, and 3) Habits of Societies.

The main objective of the book is to explore the science of habit formation. Duhigg begins with the story Eugene Pauly (E.P.) who lost the ability to remember things. His brain was frozen in time. And yet he was able to form new habits - and therefore revolutionizing the understanding of neurology for habit formation. In short, we have a habit loop: first we experience a trigger or cue (time, place, previous action, person, or feeling), which leads us to practice a routine. After the routine we receive a reward. Think for instance about getting money from the ATM, or eating a donut, or scrolling facebook after feeling bored.

In chapter 2 Duhigg explores the process of creating cravings by telling the stories of 1) Claude Hopkins stumbling upon creating the craving of brushing one's teeth and starting a billion dollar industry, 2) Proctor and Gamble's process of marketing Febreeze, and 3) Julio the monkey who loves juice. In short, if you create a craving in someone else, they experience the positive reward endorphins in the brain before one completes the routine. The anticipation of the reward makes us want it more. Think of gamblers, smokers, drug addicts or McDonald's french fries, email, text message chimes, feeling good after you exercise.

Chapter 3 explains the golden rule of habit change - basically, you can never extinguish bad habits, only change the routine for something new. Here, he interwove the coaching genius of Tony Dungy, the genesis of Alcoholics Anonymous, and Mandy the nail biter. To change habits, we must identify the cue that sets you off - seeing it is half the battle. Second if you can keep the same reward and change to a new routine, viola, a new habit is formed. Think for instance of an alcoholic, whose cue is feeling bored. Instead of drinking, they attend an AA meeting, and receive the same reward - stimulation - afterward. However, there was one extra point - having a belief you can do it. In AA groups, members turn to God or a higher power as fight addiction together. For Dungy's football team, tragedy pulled them together. He says, "Belief is essential, and it grows out of a communal experience, even if that is... two people (93)."

Part Two
Chapter 4: Paul O'Neill, Michael Phelps, and gay rights activism - video tapes, small wins, and keystone habits. When we ask, "Are some habits better than others?" the answer is undoubtedly yes - they are called keystone habits. "Watch the video tape" is what Phelps' coach would tell him before sleeping. It was a mental visualization of the perfect race, replaying the habits of jumping off the blocks and swimming perfectly. "Small wins" are how keystone habits create widespread change. "Small wins are a steady application of a small advantage." In other words, keystone habits create a cascade of improvement. "Keystone habits create structures that help other habits to flourish. (119)"

Chapter 5: Starbucks, delayed gratification, willpower and healing from major surgery.
"Starbucks... has been able in teaching employees the type of life skills that schools, families, and communities have failed to provide. (130)" Their focus is training the habit of willpower - it is "the single most important keystone habit for individual success. (131)" Willpower is often grown from delayed gratification. However, willpower comes and goes; sometimes discipline is easy, other times, it isn't. Why? Basically because willpower is a muscle. It gets tired. Other important notes: in setting goals, write out your plans. Be specific on time and place. Anticipate how you will respond to set-backs, and formulate your ideal response to that set-back.

Chapter 6: Rhode Island Hospital, The London Underground, NASA's Challenger explosion. Sometimes habits forms haphazardly, through accident. When this is the case, our routines and truces allow work to get done, but can create toxic or dangerous environments. "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste." Crisis provides the opportunity to do things you couldn't do before."

Chapter 7: When companies predict and manipulate habits - Target, radio DJs/song writers, and new meat products. Read this article by the author. It's a summary plus some more on this idea. Basically he describes the maniacal ways corporations hack our brains to create habits and manipulate us into buying junk we don't need. New parents are the holy grail of consumers because everything is in flux. So if companies can hook new parents, they'll make billions. "Someday soon, say predictive analytics experts, it will be possible for companies to know our tastes and predict our habits better than we know ourselves. (212)"

... will finish summary and review later... ( )
  nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
Reading this in 2020 made me very late at joining the party and perhaps come in with my expectations set too high because of that.

I was happy enough with the Cue - Routine - Reward schema and found many of the illustrative stories entertaining to read, but in the end, I think I was put off too much by the author obviously not being a researcher himself and making some broad assumptions in matching the stories with the science. The further I progressed through the chapters, the less I wanted to hold up my habit of never leaving a book half-read.

In the end, I do think I got one or two useful insights for myself and the organisations I work in, so three stars it is. ( )
  bbbart | Dec 27, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Charles DuhiggHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Thảo,LêCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To Oliver, John Harry, John and Doris, and, everlastingly, to Liz.
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
She was the scientists' favorite participant.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Klappentexte von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (3)

Der US-amerikanische Wissenschaftsjournalist erklärt, wie gute, aber auch schlechte Gewohnheiten funktionieren. Dabei stützt er sich auf eine Vielzahl von neurobiologischen und psychologischen Studien sowie auf Interviews mit Wissenschaftlern und Führungskräften in amerikanischen Wirtschaftsunternehmen und kommt zu dem Schluss, dass sich unser Gehirn umerziehen lässt, dass man seine Gewohnheiten also auch ändern kann. Er zeigt, wie dies gelingen kann, wie man es z. B. schafft, mehr Sport zu treiben, effizienter zu arbeiten und gesünder zu leben; darüber hinaus geht es Duhigg auch um Möglichkeiten zur Änderung von Gewohnheiten in Gesellschaften und um die Frage, wie gute soziale Gewohnheiten eine Gesellschaft zusammenhalten. Eine mit ihren zwar anschaulichen, aber auch weit ausholenden Fallgeschichten streckenweise doch reichlich aufgeblähte Anleitung zum Umdenken und zur Selbstveränderung. (3) (Reinhold Heckmann) Der US-amerikanische Wissenschaftsjournalist erklärt, wie gute, aber auch schlechte Gewohnheiten funktionieren und zeigt, dass unser Gehirn umerzogen werden kann, dass Gewohnheiten sich also auch ändern lassen. (Reinhold Heckmann)

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

LibraryThing Early Reviewers-Autor

Charles Duhiggs Buch The Power of Habit wurde im Frührezensenten-Programm LibraryThing Early Reviewers angeboten.

Registriere Dich, um ein Buch vor Veröffentlichung zu erhalten, im Tausch für eine Rezension.

Gespeicherte Links

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.88)
0.5
1 5
1.5 1
2 51
2.5 4
3 233
3.5 58
4 428
4.5 38
5 237

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 157,977,178 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar