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Was macht der Fakir auf dem Nagelbrett?: Erklärungen für…

von Georges Charpak, Henri Broch (Autor)

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1353162,457 (2.98)Keine
Can you walk over red-hot charcoal without burning your feet? Appear to stop the beating of your heart? Bend spoons using the power of your mind? In Debunked! Nobel Prize winner Georges Charpak and physics professor Henri Broch team up to show you the tricks of the trade and sleight of hand that keep astrologers, TV psychics, and spoon benders in business. Using only the simplest of science, the authors explore the effectiveness of horoscopes--the blander the better--and why, with a television audience in the millions, any strange, unlikely prediction is almost certain to come true. If such insider information does not impress your colleagues, why not pierce your tongue with a skewer or demonstrate your eerie powers by using telepathy and the telephone to get a distant friend to intuit the number and suit of a card picked at random. Charpak and Broch show you how. Not merely an expose of magic tricks, this book demonstrates how pseudoscientists use science, statistics, and psychology to bamboozle an audience--sometimes for fun, sometimes for profit. During the most scientifically advanced period in human history, belief in the paranormal and the supernatural is alarmingly common. Entertaining and enlightening, Debunked! is the antidote, vigorously asserting the virtues of doubt, skepticism, curiosity, and scientific knowledge. This lucid translation makes the arguments clear, understandable, and a pleasure to read.… (mehr)
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A very unique book explaining the probability of ESP and telekinesis, among other things and how the power of being vague is the true power in these types of belief systems. ( )
  LeeBoiBoi | Jul 17, 2019 |
A book about pseudoscience, explaining the fallacies that keep pseudoscience thriving. A thin book, easy to read, but rather thin on substance. The authors breeze through some relatively simple topics without much depth of exploration; they spend little time on each topic, and there is little to promote critical thinking in general. In addition, they make some standard errors themselves, starting out in the prologue by perpetuating the fallacy that our brains are adapted to the savannah and there hasn't been any real evolution in human history after that. This is as unlikely as any of the propositions they so readily debunk. Also, there is some indication that there is a certain ideological bent to their thinking rather than necessarily a deep commitment to bringing critical thinking to bear on all ideas, so they avoid questioning those things they believe in. A rather disappointing work. ( )
  Devil_llama | Dec 30, 2013 |
Readers of Hal's Picks will know that I have a strong interest in pseudosciences and believe that teachers should address our students' beliefs in them. When I ran across "Debunked!" by Nobel laureate Georges Charpak well-known skeptic Henri Broch, I bought a copy. I'm not sure that it is worth as much as the nearly $.20 per page that it sells for (the publisher claims it has 168 pages, but my copy has only 140, even if you count the front and back covers as four of them. There is not very much here that is new to me. Authors do spend a number of their pages describing the investigation of the "mystery" of the sarcophagus at Arles-sur-Tech, which is not widely known outside of France. They also do a good job of demonstrating the role of statistics in examining the claims that phenomena are so highly unlikely that they "must" be due to paranormal causes. One nice little factoid in the book is related to the famous NASA photo of "earthrise" as seen by the Apollo astronauts on the moon. Earth does not "rise" (or even appear to rise) when viewed from the moon. Think about it. ( )
  hcubic | Jul 7, 2013 |
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AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Charpak, GeorgesAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Broch, HenriAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt

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Can you walk over red-hot charcoal without burning your feet? Appear to stop the beating of your heart? Bend spoons using the power of your mind? In Debunked! Nobel Prize winner Georges Charpak and physics professor Henri Broch team up to show you the tricks of the trade and sleight of hand that keep astrologers, TV psychics, and spoon benders in business. Using only the simplest of science, the authors explore the effectiveness of horoscopes--the blander the better--and why, with a television audience in the millions, any strange, unlikely prediction is almost certain to come true. If such insider information does not impress your colleagues, why not pierce your tongue with a skewer or demonstrate your eerie powers by using telepathy and the telephone to get a distant friend to intuit the number and suit of a card picked at random. Charpak and Broch show you how. Not merely an expose of magic tricks, this book demonstrates how pseudoscientists use science, statistics, and psychology to bamboozle an audience--sometimes for fun, sometimes for profit. During the most scientifically advanced period in human history, belief in the paranormal and the supernatural is alarmingly common. Entertaining and enlightening, Debunked! is the antidote, vigorously asserting the virtues of doubt, skepticism, curiosity, and scientific knowledge. This lucid translation makes the arguments clear, understandable, and a pleasure to read.

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