StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Hast du schon SantaThing angesehen, LibraryThings Geschenkaktionstradition?
ausblenden
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Nehmt-- und zahlt dafür (1936)

von Winifred Holtby

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
8253720,520 (4.03)1 / 348
After the death of her fiancé, an ambitious young woman returns home to a depressed, post-World War I Yorkshire village to become headmistress of the local girls' school.
  1. 20
    Middlemarch: Eine Studie über das Leben in der Provinz von George Eliot (Booksloth)
  2. 10
    The Headmistress von Angela Thirkell (thorold)
    thorold: Sarah Burton and Miss Sparling may be poles apart in political terms, but it's fun to see how much Thirkell's idea of a headmistress overlaps with Holtby's, despite that.
  3. 00
    Haweswater von Sarah Hall (fountainoverflows)
    fountainoverflows: A study of a community confronted "progress". Carefully developed characters and a love story to boot.
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

» Siehe auch 348 Erwähnungen/Diskussionen

Full disclosure: I began [South Riding] in mid-August this year of covid, 2020, and I have only finished it now at the end of November. Why did I put it down? Because of the times we are in and my own state of mind, yes. In earlier days (what we call "Before Times" around here) I would not have put it down, although, as I will get to, I would note the shift in tone about 2/3rds through the book and I would add that the shift disappointed me. It's a curious feature of novel-writing that you write along mining a vein for awhile, but then you come along to, exactly as in real life, a crucial moment when a choice must be made and what you then, as the writer, decide your characters will do or how they will react to an event (even if you choose to say, "the character made me do it") the book will definitively move into a final direction. Sometimes the shift is highly original and intriguing, or breathtaking, expanding outward into the unknown, at other times, there is a failure of nerve or imagination and the protagonist doesn't take the leap, choose to fold back on his or herself, there are thousands of ways these choices can play out so that sometimes the choice to fold inward, becomes (somehow) an expanding outward. This, is, I think what Holtby intended and that is pretty much exactly where I put the book down, overwhelmed. Embedded within this story of a town in Yorkshire, the new headmistress of the girl's school, the town council and the growing pains in the early 1930's of the area. is a love story. Well, several love stories, but only one is central. Robert Carne, the local squire, wants to maintain things as they are, but his life is a mess, his wife mad and requiring housing in an institution. She is a true aristocrat (whereas Carne is of the olde landed gentry ilk and this marriage was a disaster for all concerned.) He runs his farms well, but the expenses of his wife's care have ruined him. Schemes abound but Carne, caught up in his belief in his way of life, cannot see that he must change, compromise orlose. Two women adore Carne, an older woman, Mrs. Beddows, also a Councilwoman and the new headmistress who reluctantly falls in love with him. The best story here, the most original and moving, is the love Mrs. Beddows holds for Robert Carne, twenty years her junior. I went back to the novel at last for her sake. There is a moment where she admits to the younger woman, the headmistress, that her love for Carne has been confusing, that you look in the mirror and see three score and ten, but inside you're just a girl. I'm old enough now to know that and know how poignant an emotion that is. Well worth reading, this novel. Worth also knowing that Holtby was dying as she finished this, her last, and I do think the choice she made, to turn inward, was part of her own reconciliation with her approaching death. ****1/2 ( )
6 abstimmen sibylline | Nov 29, 2020 |
This novel rivals Middlemarch for its microcosmic view of English rural life and its insights into the characters who inhabit their particular area of the countryside. Several of the covers offer a woman's face, suggesting that Sarah Burton is the focal point of the novel, but I am afraid pigeonholes this novel as a story just as a woman's novel when it is far better than that. Just as Middlemarch is more than Dorothea Brooks, South Riding is about human nature and how even the most ordinary of us struggle to make the best of our limitations, whether they be physical, intellectual, or spiritual. Flawed as we all are, our commonalities make us a community worth fighting for, not blindly, but as fully grounded in our values as possible.And what is best about this book is that it does not minimize those flaws, or the personal pain and guilt we inflict upon ourselves for being flawed. As one character tells another, "'And who are you to think you could get through life without pain? Did you expect never to be ashamed of yourself? Of course this hurts you. And it will go on hurting. You needn't believe much what they say about time healing. I've had seventy years and more of time and there are plenty of things in my life still won't bear thinking of. You've just got to get along as best you can with all your shames and sorrows and humiliations. Maybe in the end it's those things arte most use to you." It is up to each of us to decide what we will do about our shames, sorrows and humiliations, but the novel makes clear that we all have to carry them forward with us. ( )
  PatsyMurray | May 24, 2020 |
Figlia di un fabbro dedito all'alcol, Sarah Burton è riuscita a emanciparsi diventando un'insegnante a Londra e nelle scuole per missionarie del Sud Africa. Quando decide di tornare nella sua contea d'origine, il South Riding, lo fa per candidarsi a guida della scuola superiore femminile. Tutto il comitato direttivo dell'istituto è a suo favore tranne l'aristocratico Robert Carne, che amministra la scuola per mostrarsi impegnato nel sociale e seguire le proprie aspirazioni politiche, ma è spesso ostacolato da una torbida situazione matrimoniale e da una figlia difficile da educare. Lottando contro il fascino dell'orgoglioso Robert, le beghe e i sotterfugi amministrativi della Contea e le difficoltà portate dalla depressione economica, Sarah si impegnerà comunque a dare alle proprie allieve una speranza per il futuro.
  kikka62 | Mar 8, 2020 |
South Riding is a pleasant sweep of a fictional countryside set in 1930s Yorkshire. The characters are colourful and span multiple generations. Holtby gives a sharp and often humorous account of local government and how it affects parties ranging from gentry to farmers. Through headmistress Sarah Burton, you also glimpse Holtby's particular interests as a feminist and pacifist.

The ending isn't traditional; this isn't a run-of-the-mill romance; what you have in Holtby's last work, written when she knew these words would be her last, is an engaging insight into a countryside community at a crossroads. ( )
  jigarpatel | Jan 25, 2020 |
I guess you're meant to sympathise with the main protagonist, Miss Burton, who is the right kind of spinster--despite her quirks and her angular features and her red hair (good or bad depending on who you talk to), she's well- adjusted and charming. There's one Miss Sigglesthwaite, however, who's the Doomed Spinster, who was meant for a lifetime of research and learning and instead became a teacher, and is ill-adjusted to the work, but because of her position (she has to care for her mother) she can't simply quit her job and do what comes naturally to her. Worst of all by the standards of the slightly lean-in bourgeois feminism of Miss Burton, Miss Sigglesthwaite has not learned to monetise her hotness and so exists forever in a drab display of undone buttons and falling hems or whatever. She appears for a bit and is gone, but she's the one I could identify with:

"It's true. I know I can't keep order. I've lost confidence. I can't trust myself to keep my temper. It's being always so tired. Those dreadful nights, when you can't sleep, waiting for dawn; and then the dawn comes and you dread it, because in an hour you must get up, in two hours you must face that dreadful staff-room. The young mistresses. It's so easy to be unafraid when you're strong and pretty. Girls get crushes on Belinda Masters. She pretends it's a nuisance, yet it gives her power. Power. Confidence. That's what I'm needing. Oh, if only Father hadn't died quite so early. He believed in me."

Miss Sigglesthwaite is not treated fairly at all by the narrative. She is just made to disappear into oblivion, as though it should be perfectly natural why no one should believe in her. All because she didn't realise early enough that she needed to be liked and had to make an effort to appear pretty even if she didn't care for pretty.

Wanted to give the book three stars because of that but that would be unfair because the book is otherwise very good and rich in ideas. ( )
  subabat | Mar 19, 2018 |
Holtby understood the necessity of conveying progressive ideas to the widest possible readership, of the kind that Woolf scorned in her essay "The Middlebrow".
hinzugefügt von thorold | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Mark Bostridge (Feb 19, 2011)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (4 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Holtby, WinifredHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Boyd, CaroleErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Brittain, VeraEpitaphCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Cooper, LetticeEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Shaw, MarionEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sommerfelt, AiméeÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Williams, ShirleyPrefaceCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
"Take what you want," said God. "Take it---and pay for it."

Old Spanish Proverb
Quoted in This Was My World by Viscountess Rhondda.
"I tell the things I know, the things I knew
Before I knew them, immemorially;
And as the fieldsman with unhurrying tread
Trudges with steady and unchanging pace,
Being born to clays that in the winter hold,
So my pedestrian measure gravely plods
Telling a loutish life."

V. Sackville-West
The Land.
Widmung
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Young Lovell Brown, taking his place for the first time in the Press Gallery of the South Riding County Hall at Flintonbridge, was prepared to be impressed by everything.
Winifred Holtby, who had met my mother in the autumn of 1919, when both were students at Somerville College, Oxford, was, like her, a writer. (Preface)
In February 1935 Winifred Holtby, staying in Hornsea on the Yorkshire coast in order to escape the distractions and fatigue of life in London, wrote to her friend Vera Brittain to say that she had received 'a very nice letter from Virginia Woolf asking if I would like to write an autobiography for the Hogarth Press'. (Introduction)
South Riding is the last novel that Winifred Holtby will write. (Epitaph)
Zitate
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
I was born to be a spinster, and by God, I'm going to spin.
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

After the death of her fiancé, an ambitious young woman returns home to a depressed, post-World War I Yorkshire village to become headmistress of the local girls' school.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (4.03)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 6
2.5 2
3 17
3.5 12
4 69
4.5 15
5 42

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,327,323 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar