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The Waste Land (Norton Critical Editions)…
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The Waste Land (Norton Critical Editions) (Original 2000; 2000. Auflage)

von T. S. Eliot (Autor), Michael North (Herausgeber)

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1,3451210,815 (4.12)2
Published in 1922, The Waste Land was the most revolutionary poem of its time, offering a devastating vision of modern civilisation between the two World Wars. This beautifully designed edition forms part of a series of ten titles celebrating Faber's publishing over the decades.
Mitglied:katethegreat44
Titel:The Waste Land (Norton Critical Editions)
Autoren:T. S. Eliot (Autor)
Weitere Autoren:Michael North (Herausgeber)
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2000), Edition: 1st, 320 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:*****
Tags:Keine

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The Waste Land (Norton Critical Editions) von T. S. Eliot (2000)

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While the poem is obscure, critics have identified several sources that inspired its creation and which have helped determine its meaning. Many see the poem as a reflection of Eliot's disillusionment with the moral decay of post–World War I Europe. In the work, this sense of disillusionment manifests itself symbolically through a type of Holy Grail legend. Eliot cited two books from which he drew to create the poem's symbolism: Jessie L. Weston's From Ritual to Romance (1920) and Sir James G. Frazer's The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (1890).

The title refers to a myth from From Ritual to Romance, in which Weston describes a kingdom where the genitals of the king, known as the Fisher King, have been wounded in some way. This injury, which affects the king's fertility, also mythically affects the kingdom itself. With its vital, regenerative power gone, the kingdom has dried up and turned into a waste land. In order for the land to be restored, a hero must complete several tasks, or trials. Weston notes that this ancient myth was the basis for various other quest stories from many cultures, including the Christian quest for the Holy Grail. Eliot says he drew heavily on this myth for his poem, and critics have noted that many of the poem's references refer to this idea. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Nov 4, 2021 |
Confusing poem full of symbolism and literary references all of which went straight over my head. I'm not cut out for symbolism. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
The Waste Land. T.S. Eliot. A Norton Critical Edition, edited by Michael North. 2001. We read this poem along with “Lepanto” for our book club, Dipso. I was more impatient reading it this time as some of my blind adoration of modern poetry has faded as I aged. It is just a difficult to read now as it was in the 60s and 70s, I do prefer Eliot’s other works. If you want to stumble through it again, this edition has great essays and tons of notes. Does it have memorable lines? Is it a just and apt description of our present civilization? Will I re-read it agin? Yes, Yes, and no, probably not. ( )
  judithrs | Jun 9, 2019 |
This isn't a review of the poem. If you've read anything written since, say, 1938, and liked it, then you like The Waste Land. You might not know it, but there it is. Even if what you like was written by a hater of this poem, it wouldn't have existed without it. Giving it stars is like giving stars to Homer, or Dante, or Goethe, or Shakespeare. You've already decided if you like it or not before you start reading it. Are you a rebellious teenager with a leftist bent? You already hate it. Are you a snob who believes in nothing so much as the inevitable decline of culture? You'll love it. And so on.

But I am reviewing this Norton Critical Edition, which includes the poem; 'Sources' ranging from Buddha's Fire-Sermon and the relevant Upanishad down to Frazer Weston and Baudelaire; some relevant statements by Eliot; reviews and criticism.

Sources: Useful, but really, why bother putting in the KJV while not putting in the Verlaine and Nerval which Eliot quotes? That's an odd choice. The KJV is available wherever bytes are being consumed; the poems are substantially harder to track down and more obviously important for this poem.

Eliot's writings: nice to have all in one place, but there's nothing more annoying than skipping paragraphs out of essays, or printing one paragraph from an essay. Could this book not have been 15 pages longer? Then we could have had all of 'Tradition...' at least.

Reviews and First Reactions: A good sampling of how people read it at the time it was released, although not particularly valuable as readings of the poem. Malcolm Cowley's piece was especially interesting: "we were excited by the adventure of living in the present... we were entering a new world of art that did not impress us as being a spiritual desert," and so his generation rejected The Waste Land. Too bad they were wrong, eh Mal? Turns out post-war was pretty shitty.

Criticism: two halves. First, essays grouped under 'The New Criticism.' Those which are appreciative generally take an optimistic view of the poem as solving some problem, or making possible salvation. The more recent criticism is predictably eye-rolling. Moody's 'A Cure for a Crisis...' is good; Bush gives us some sub-Freudian dubieties (Tiresias is in the Oedipus myth! Therefore...!!!) Ellmann gives us scads of those same dubieties mingled with the conflations of which recent criticism can't rid itself: "emasculation corresponds to other injuries, particularly to the mutilation of the voice: as if the phallus were complicit with the Logos. Lacking both, language has become a 'waste of breath', a barren dissemination." Of course it has. Because, y'know, daddy = the signified = the phallus = Jesus = the abject = self-consumign artifacts = Eliot. And Armstrong gives us such gems as "sieving is a process applied to sewage" rather than, say, the making of flour or panning for gold. Apparently the most important bits of The Waste Land are the bits Pound and Eliot cut out of the drafts, and Pound welled "phallicly and creatively" for John Quinn, which would probably have been news to Quinn, who just thought he was being asked for money (again) rather than a blow job.

The editors have done a good job, there's no doubt about it. They couldn't have shown better the fatuity of contemporary criticism if they'd tried. If the study of literature persists into this century, I hope we move past what is clearly the anal phase of scholarly culture. Leave the poop alone, people.

( )
  stillatim | Dec 29, 2013 |
the facsimile edition (published around 1969) of the original draft, with valerie eliot & ezra pound's mark-ups, indispensable : you get an impression of how much of the final was pound's edit ... fascinating study. ( )
  nobodhi | Apr 8, 2013 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Eliot, T. S.Hauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
North, MichaelHerausgeberHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Baudelaire, CharlesMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Frazer, James G.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Weston, Jessie L.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Wilson, EdmundMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Woolf, VirginiaMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt

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Published in 1922, The Waste Land was the most revolutionary poem of its time, offering a devastating vision of modern civilisation between the two World Wars. This beautifully designed edition forms part of a series of ten titles celebrating Faber's publishing over the decades.

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