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The Eustace Diamonds von Anthony Trollope
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The Eustace Diamonds (Original 2004; 1876. Auflage)

von Anthony Trollope

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
1,733377,629 (3.91)2 / 222
The third novel in Trollopes Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds bears all the hallmarks of his later works, blending dark cynicism with humor and a keen perception of human nature. Following the death of her husband, Sir Florian, beautiful Lizzie Eustace mysteriously comes into possession of a hugely expensive diamond necklace. She maintains it was a gift from her husband, but the Eustace lawyers insist she give it up, and while her cousin Frank takes her side, her new lover, Lord Fawn, declares that he will only marry her if the necklace is surrendered. As gossip and scandal intensify, Lizzies truthfulness is thrown into doubt, and, in her desire to keep the jewels, she is driven to increasingly desperate acts.… (mehr)
Mitglied:chilperic
Titel:The Eustace Diamonds
Autoren:Anthony Trollope
Info:Oxford World's Classics 1930, rperinted 1941
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:English literature, Oxford Trollope

Werk-Details

The Eustace Diamonds von Anthony Trollope (Author) (2004)

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Not as riveting as some of Trollope's others. I grew tired of Lizzie's petulant air. There was also a lack of politics which, dry as they may sound, are actually quite riveting for me. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
Oh, what a maddening book!

As I read there were moments when I thought this might be my favourite Trollope (to date) and there were moments when I thought it would be at the bottom of the list.

In the end I did like it. But ….

The story spins around Lizzie Greystock, who will quickly rise to become Lady Eustace.

Lizzie was the only child of the disreputable Admiral Greystock, who died leaving her nothing but debts. Fortunately his daughter had learned to live by her wits, and she realised that to marry money to make her way in the world. And so she chose to live with a rather difficult elderly relation, because that put her in the right location and the right strata of society to catch a wealthy husband.

She caught Sir Florian Eustace. He was exceedingly rich, but he was in poor health, and Lizzie was a widow before her first wedding anniversary. She was wealthy, she would soon be the other of the Eustace heir, and she was in possession of the Eustace Diamonds; a fabulous diamond necklace, valued at ten thousand pounds then, which equates to around half a million now

Lizzie said that they were hers; the Eustace family insisted that they were part of the estate and must be returned to the trustees. Though Lizzie knew her claim was shaky she held her ground, she spun a very good story, and she began to look for a husband who she hoped would protect her and look after her interests.
Lord Fawn proposed, but he tried to back out when he realised that dispute over the diamonds might have consequences for his own reputation for her. Lizzie didn’t want to marry a an like that, but she wasn’t going to let herself be jilted. She had to be the victor, she had to have the final word. Always.

She was fond of her cousin Frank, the only one of her relations who had stood by her, and Lizzie knew that, as a barrister and a member of parliament with very limited resources, he needed a wealthy bride. She didn’t understand why he didn’t propose. She didn’t know – he didn’t tell her – that he was engaged already.

Lucy Morris had been left alone in the world, just like Lizzie, but she had dealt with the situation rather differently. She accepted that she had to earn her own living, she became a governess, and she had the qualities she needed to make her a very good governess. She loved Frank, she knew that he loved her, but because she worked for the Fawn family she found herself in a rather awkward position.
One night, when she was travelling between her Scottish home and her London home Lizzie’s room was broken into, and the metal chest that kept her diamonds secure was stolen.

Who was responsible? Who had the diamonds?

The answer was surprising, and it seemed inevitable that Lizzie’s lies would be revealed and that she, and anyone close to her, would be ruined.

How ever could Lizzie rise above that.

The way the story played out was wonderful.

But I couldn’t help thinking that it didn’t suit its author, that there were other authors who might have handled this particular story rather better.

most of all, I was disappointed that Trollope, who usually had understanding for all of his characters, had none for Lizzie. He said at the start that he didn’t like her and he took every chance he could to point out that she was manipulative, dishonest, a compulsive liar, a thief …..

Yes, she was all of those things, but I understood why. I couldn’t warm to her, but I appreciated that she was taking charge of her own life, that she strove to be successful and to find her ‘corsair’ – the dashing romantic hero who would sweep her off her feet.

She was all those things, but she was so much more than that.

Others are judged less harshly.

Consider Frank, who proposes when he knows his financial situation makes marriage impossible, and who neglects his fiancée because he must look after his cousin’s interests.

Consider Lizzie’s friend Mrs Carbuncle who is determined that her niece Lucy must marry, who pushed her towards an engagement with a horrible man, and who fails to understand that her niece feels only revulsion, so that in the end her mind snaps.

Both of those stories were neglected; they felt secondary, and they are fatally compromised; Lucy would have been much more at home in a Dickens novel; I’d love to see what Wilkie Collins could do with Lucinda’s story.

A lot of this book just didn’t feel like Trollope; it feels like an attempt to do something a little different. There’s an early reference to ‘Vanity Fair’ and though this is a very different story I think that’s telling.

I still have to say that there was much that I loved.

I loved Lady Fawn, who was both warm and gracious, and who did her very best for Lucy.

I loved watching first Lizzie and then Lucy deal with the rather difficult Lady Linlithgow, in very different ways and with very different consequences.

I loved the sojourns – and the incidents – in the Scottish countryside.

I loved watching Lizzie outmanoeuvre Lord Fawn, who was ever bit as wishy-washy and self-serving as I remembered from ‘Phinneas Finn’

Most of all I loved watching Lizzie and following her progress.

Yes, I found much to enjoy, but I’m afraid that the book as a whole didn’t work as well as Trollope's usually does. ( )
  BeyondEdenRock | Sep 16, 2021 |
Trollope informs readers early on that Lizzie Greystock is not meant to be the second coming of Becky Sharp. She certainly isn't, but her shameless self-interest and whirlwind (for Trollope) origin story concerning her marriage to the soon-to-die Lord Florian Eustace was entertaining. There is a large cast added to the Palliser novels here, including Lizzie's cousin Frank Greystock, M.P. who has seemingly inherited an ability to outspend his pockets, the dutiful and much-petted governess Lucy Morris, the dowager Lady Linlithgow and her observance to the letter of right without ever being good, and the wealthy hangers-on Lord Bruce and Mrs. Carbuncle, and the most tedious and angry pair of lovers I've seen in an age Sir Griffin and Lucinda Roanoke. Trollope can really set a stage. One of the notable things about this work, however, is the plot. Or, rather, what the plot could have been.

There was a nice break from politics in this novel, though Trollope has a bit of fun with the conservative M.P. Frank Greystock and his "nemesis" Lord Fawn. The real plot involves the widowed Lady Lizzie Eustace refusing to give up a valuable diamond necklace that is claimed to be a part of the Eustace estate and, therefore, not to be taken by a widow. Lizzie's insistence on the necklace being her own causes grief between her and Lord Fawn as a suitor, and the diamond's bright glitter attracts the attention of the unscrupulous. When the diamonds are stolen the novel turns away from a social comedy and (dry) legal thriller into a bit of a mystery novel complete with famous detective and cunning members of Scotland Yard competing to be the one to crack the case.

At least, it would have turned into a mystery novel if Trollope didn't somehow think it was ungentlemanly to hide facts from his readers. There is never really a mystery to the reader as to where the diamonds are, only a bit of fluff concerning the mechanics of the theft(s). This isn't a spoiler, the back cover of most editions say as much about the fate of the diamonds. Certain elements of this novel could have become something if Trollope had allowed himself to "trick" his readers, but such is not the behavior of a gentleman. Read 'The Moonstone' instead if you're looking for a fun, primordial mystery-novel from this era. It must be said, also, that there is strong anti-Semitic sentiment in the book. These were the attitudes of the time, but make a book with a turgid plot that much less enjoyable.

The Pallisers

Next: 'Phineas Redux'

Previous: 'Phineas Finn' ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Sep 10, 2020 |
A very enjoyable novel well-read by Simon Vance. ( )
  charlie68 | Mar 3, 2018 |
This book had an entertaining plot, but it seemed to bog down in so many side plots that it nearly lost my interest at several points. Clearly, the side plots are meant to enrich and emphasize the main themes of the book, but I like a plot that moves a little more quickly. And some of the characters, particularly the "good" girl, Lucy Morris, seemed flat. ( )
  kaitanya64 | Jan 3, 2017 |
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» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (41 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Trollope, AnthonyAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Gill, StephenHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Gill, StephenEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Riley, KennethIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sadleir, MichaelEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sutherland, JohnEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sutherland, JohnHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Thomas, LlewellynIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Trollope, JoannaEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Vance, SimonErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
West, TimothyErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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It was admitted by all her friends, and also by her enemies, - who were in truth the more numerous and active body of the two, - that Lizzie Greystock had done very well with herself.
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We hear that a man has behaved badly to a girl, when the behaviour of which he has been guilty has resulted simply from want of thought. He has found a certain companionship to be agreeable to him, and he has accepted the pleasure without inquiry. Some vague idea has floated across his brain that the world is wrong in supposing that such friendship cannot exist without marriage, or question of marriage. It is simply friendship. And yet were his friend to tell him that she intended to give herself in marriage elsewhere, he would suffer all the pangs of jealousy, and would imagine himself to be horribly ill-treated! To have such a friend,—a friend whom he cannot or will not make his wife,—is no injury to him. To him it is simply a delight, an excitement in life, a thing to be known to himself only and not talked of to others, a source of pride and inward exultation. It is a joy to think of when he wakes, and a consolation in his little troubles. It dispels the weariness of life, and makes a green spot of holiday within his daily work. It is, indeed, death to her;—but he does not know it.
"To have been always in the right, and yet always on the losing side, always being ruined . . and yet never to lose anything, is pleasant enough. A huge, living, daily increasing grievance that does one no palpable harm, is the happiest possession that a man can have."
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The third novel in Trollopes Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds bears all the hallmarks of his later works, blending dark cynicism with humor and a keen perception of human nature. Following the death of her husband, Sir Florian, beautiful Lizzie Eustace mysteriously comes into possession of a hugely expensive diamond necklace. She maintains it was a gift from her husband, but the Eustace lawyers insist she give it up, and while her cousin Frank takes her side, her new lover, Lord Fawn, declares that he will only marry her if the necklace is surrendered. As gossip and scandal intensify, Lizzies truthfulness is thrown into doubt, and, in her desire to keep the jewels, she is driven to increasingly desperate acts.

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