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Drone Theory von Gregoire Chamayou Gr?goire…
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Drone Theory (2015. Auflage)

von Gregoire Chamayou Gr?goire Chamayou (Autor)

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In a unique take on a subject that has grabbed headlines and is consuming billions of taxpayer dollars each year, philosopher Grégoire Chamayou applies the lens of philosophy to our understanding of how drones are changing our world. For the first time in history, a state has claimed the right to wage war across a mobile battlefield that potentially spans the globe. Remote-control flying weapons, he argues, take us well beyond even George W. Bush's justification for the war on terror.… (mehr)
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Titel:Drone Theory
Autoren:Gregoire Chamayou Gr?goire Chamayou (Autor)
Info:Penguin Books Ltd (2015)
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A Theory of the Drone von Grégoire Chamayou

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If it is true that weapons constitute the essence of combatants, what is the essence of those who fight using drones?

Two years running, I have been swept along and often befuddled by a stream of theory texts. Scratching my head, I have attempted vainly to stay abreast on communication, virtual presence and what we talk about when we talk about work. Nowhere in my stumbling have I been as shocked as I was within this text. About 1000 years ago I bathed in news. My wife was so proud that I read The Guardian for about a hour every morning before work. This simply doesn't happen anymore. Fatigue, cynicism and a keen desire to read for me have elbowed that commitment aside.

Yes, I admitting that I was only paying half-attention to a foreign policy which chose to prosecute its War on Terror by incinerating its opponents rather than by imprisoning and torturing them. I remember reports on NPR about such. Is it possible to formualte a reaction? Would an attempt possibly be honest or - more remotely- truthful. One reviwer of this book said the argument deserved a Camus, not a Derrida. I resent that.

Then suddenly I had this book and I was ill prepared for such clear distinction about how drones are not conducting military operations as much as they man-hunting. By blowing up people and things below without controlling the ground narrative, the WOT is in fact completely opposed to the principles of counter-insurgency. Should we mention how we violate sovereign nations to achieve these targeted assassinations? Kill Lists cloud the issues where drones are regarded and defended as precise and humane: no, I'm not making that shit up. Those are the standard terms in the argument. So Hellfire missiles are lauded as precise, as compared to what? The humane aspect is something else. I'm speechless. This isn't the time nor place but I am left pondering the technological curve and the naked lunch of Imperialism. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
Peter Singer’s “Wired for War” (2009) really broke the deck [naval aviation parlance for being the first to land in a recovery cycle onboard an aircraft carrier] on remotely controlled weapons, both air and surface. He brought this emerging technology and it’s impact on the battlespace to a broader audience. What Singer did for the general public -- both professional and armchair wonks -- in terms of education and enlightenment, Frenchman Grégoire Chamayou elevates the discussion to cover the ethical, social, and legal terrain of drones -- remotely piloted aircraft -- and their impact on the state. An ideal complement to Singer’s book, Chamayou’s “Theory of the Drone” should be required reading for everyone in the national security field as well as an informed citizenry.

The book is organized into five sections: (1) techniques and tactics, which describes how the drone has allowed killing from afar, (2) ethos and psyche, which discusses the among other things the separation of traditional warrior values like bravery and courage fromcombat, (3) necroethics and the one-sidedness of the consequence of death in fighting, (4) principles and philosophy of right to kill, which casts drone kills into an “other” category that isn’t quite war-fighting and not quite law enforcement, and (5) political bodies, in which the role of the state and its citizens in war is discussed and who is supporting whom in the endeavor.

Chamayou’s book is largely an argument against. While drones provide a unique capability and they support a win at any cost strategy (ends justify the means,) we are not fully conscious of the effect the means are having on our society. By removing the human cost of of battle, we reduce the barriers to entry and may be more inclined toward perpetual war. By employing drones globally and killing in countries that aren’t in a state of war (like Pakistan,) we ignore the laws of armed conflict that we have ascribed to for a century. The arguments for drones: cheaper, safer, persistent are valid in terms of accomplishing a job, but this book does true justice to answering the question: at what cost to society and our humanity?

The questions that arise in this book are multiple and it would provide a rich opportunity for discussion in any classroom or pub (for those of us who’ve had enough school.) While the United States may be one of the most advanced users of military drones, it really is still in the Wright brothers stage in terms of capability and battlespace saturation. As the U.S. Navy looks to put Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles aboard its carriers and the USAF ponders what may its last manned bomber, the ethical and social consequences of killing by remote control need to be had now. ( )
  traumleben | Apr 5, 2015 |
"Chamayou, a research scholar at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France's largest government research organization, wrote this book to make the case that in the pursuit of 'warfare without risk,' armed, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) contradict just about everything morally and legally associated with conventional warfare. ...Recommended for public and academic libraries."
hinzugefügt von DiscothequeKittens | bearbeitenLibrary Journal | January 2015 | Vol. 140 No. 1, Jeffrey J. Dickens (Jan 1, 2015)
 
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In a unique take on a subject that has grabbed headlines and is consuming billions of taxpayer dollars each year, philosopher Grégoire Chamayou applies the lens of philosophy to our understanding of how drones are changing our world. For the first time in history, a state has claimed the right to wage war across a mobile battlefield that potentially spans the globe. Remote-control flying weapons, he argues, take us well beyond even George W. Bush's justification for the war on terror.

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