StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Lord Jim (1900)

von Joseph Conrad

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
8,171101848 (3.69)305
Mit gro em psychologischem Einfühlungsvermögen wird die Geschichte eines Seemannes erzählt, der gegen die Ehre seines Berufs verstö t und sein Leben lang von dieser Schuld bedrängt wird.
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Fiction
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
If you’ve heard that Joseph Conrad wrote sea tales and come to Lord Jim expecting a Hornblower tale, you’ll be disappointed. Conrad’s first-hand experience of the sea in its many moods is evident. But the sea is merely the canvas; Conrad’s real subject is the depths of the heart, the vagaries of the human psyche. In this, Conrad’s books are similar to those of a contemporary novelist, Henry James.
The title character of the book appears and disappears, yet is the center of the book. Most of what we learn about Jim is third hand, as is much of the action of the plot. Almost all of the book, from chapter 5 to chapter 35, is told by a seaman only identified as Marlow, who also narrates Heart of Darkness. It’s an interesting narration technique: between us, the readers, and the protagonist stands the author, the nameless narrator who recounts what he heard from Marlow, who for his part, fills in what he heard directly from Jim with the accounts of other memorable characters such as Stein and Gentleman Brown. This distances us from the action. Marlow’s comment about Jim in chapter 21, “It is only through me that he exists for you,” is a reminder from Conrad of what is true about all fiction.
From childhood, Jim dreamed of performing heroic deeds. Stein, one of the many memorable secondary characters, diagnoses him, without ever meeting him, as a romantic. Yet when Jim twice finds himself in a situation calling for action—not even something heroic, but no more than would be expected of any seaman—he freezes. An understandable lapse, except that Jim cannot forgive himself, especially after the second incident, which leaves him stripped of his seaman’s papers. Jim can’t live with the discrepancy between his imagined ideal of himself and the reality of his failure, so he tries to disappear—running not so much from others as from himself.
Marlow slips into acting as his patron, arranging a series of positions for him, from which Jim flees every time his identity is revealed. Finally, Jim achieves some measure of peace in the remote trading station of Patusan, sent to be the agent of Stein. It isn’t long before he lives up to his image of himself, becoming the Tuan, the lord of the local population, and finding love with a woman he calls Jewel, stepdaughter of the corrupt agent he displaces. The idyll can’t last, of course. The last few chapters of this book, once a malevolent agent of destiny enters, were nearly unbearable to read. It seems as if Jim can only be destroyed by his evil twin, another product of Britain’s “us,” that is, the “right people.” Yet, like Jim, Gentleman Brown has been deformed by his experience of the South Seas. Whereas for Jim, the deformity takes the form of a naive devotion to honor, Brown has lost all sense of it.
All in all, this book is a well-told tale, written in rich late-nineteenth-century prose. Conrad, like Henry James, can strike the modern reader as long-winded. He often takes three sentences to say what writers today might say in one. This doesn’t strike me as padding, however. Instead, the expansiveness serves a purpose. It’s not for speed-reading but savoring. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
A book for everyone to read. The story is an exploration of the expression of ego in a man of action. Or it is about redemption after the awakening to sin and human weakness. At any rate it is a character study viewed through the lens of a flawed narrator, fascinating, and due to be recalled continuously after the work has been read. Jim does wrong, but after being brought to understand that, how does he choose to live? There is an exotic milieu and colourful challenges, and Conrad's marvelous prose to enjoy. The book began to influence the world in 1900. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jun 29, 2021 |
A young man with exalted fantasies of himself cannot recover his self-esteem after one act of cowardice. The result is the loss of his best friend, the deaths of people who have trusted him, heartbreak of the woman who loved him and his own death.
  ritaer | May 3, 2021 |
A thrilling & interesting story of an honorable but unfortunate seaman. Utilizes a surprising meta device to frame the story - the whole book is being told by a sailor at a bar.

The writing was beautiful but I found it to be overly ornate & overwrought at points. Was really a slog to get through some sections. Ultimately worthwhile. Great & tragic ending! ( )
  boxofgeese | Feb 23, 2021 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (105 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Conrad, JosephAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Adams, J. DonaldEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Crossley, StevenErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hampson, RobertHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Lorch, FritzÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Mathias, RobertUmschlaggestalterCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Monod, SylvèreVorwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Monsarrat, NicholasEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Mursia, UgoÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Prinzhofer, RenatoÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Siciliano, EnzoVorwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stafford, EdVorwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ward, LyndIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Watts, CedricHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

Ist enthalten in

Bearbeitet/umgesetzt in

Hat eine Studie über

Ein Kommentar zu dem Text findet sich in

Hat als Erläuterung für Schüler oder Studenten

Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
"It is certain my Conviction gains infinitely, the moment another soul will believe in it."

-Novalis
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To Mr. and Mrs. G. F. W. Hope
With Grateful Affection
After Many Years
Of Friendship
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
He was an inch, perhaps two, under six feet, powerfully built, and he advanced straight at you with a slight stoop of the shoulders, head forward, and a fixed from-under stare which made you think of a charging bull. His voice was deep, loud, and his manner displayed a kind of dogged self-assertion which had nothing aggressive in it. It seemed a necessity, and it was directed apparently as much at himself as at anybody else. He was spotlessly neat, apparelled in immaculate white from shoes to hat, and in the various Eastern ports where he got his living as ship-chandler’s water-clerk he was very popular.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

Mit gro em psychologischem Einfühlungsvermögen wird die Geschichte eines Seemannes erzählt, der gegen die Ehre seines Berufs verstö t und sein Leben lang von dieser Schuld bedrängt wird.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.69)
0.5 2
1 39
1.5 5
2 75
2.5 24
3 241
3.5 64
4 340
4.5 40
5 243

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

Penguin Australia

2 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Penguin Australia veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 0141441615, 0141199059

Urban Romantics

2 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Urban Romantics veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 1909438030, 1909438162

Tantor Media

Eine Ausgabe dieses Buches wurde Tantor Media herausgegeben.

» Verlagsinformations-Seite

Recorded Books

Eine Ausgabe dieses Buches wurde Recorded Books herausgegeben.

» Verlagsinformations-Seite

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 171,544,192 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar