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The Tell-Tale Heart (Bantam Classics) von…
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The Tell-Tale Heart (Bantam Classics) (1983. Auflage)

von Edgar Allan Poe

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
2,012236,273 (4.06)1 / 54
Edgar Allan Poe remains the unsurpassed master of works of mystery and madness in this outstanding collection of Poe's prose and poetry are sixteen of his finest tales, including "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "William Wilson," "The Black Cat," "The Cask of Amontillado," and "Eleonora". Here too is a major selection of what Poe characterized as the passion of his life, his poems - "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," Ulalume," "Lenore," "The Bells," and more, plus his glorious prose poem "Silence - A Fable" and only full-length novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.… (mehr)
Mitglied:GlennRussell
Titel:The Tell-Tale Heart (Bantam Classics)
Autoren:Edgar Allan Poe
Info:Bantam Classics (1983), Mass Market, 448 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:*****
Tags:Keine

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The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings. von Edgar Allan Poe

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» Siehe auch 54 Erwähnungen/Diskussionen

I love this story. I find it interesting how the narrator of the story is insane, but he thinks he is perfectly reasonable in his actions. ( )
  DoomLuz | Jul 20, 2021 |
I love gothic literature and especially Edgar Allen Poe. His writing is so intricate and detailed that it makes the short stories feel like you just read 400 pages of a novel. - Review by W. Seidel
  BethanieODell | Jan 27, 2021 |
I have read this for the 3rd time and finished 10/08/12.

Very good! I like Poe. This collection wasn't the best, though. For example, I wish Hop Frog was in it. I like that short story. I like Marie Roget, too, but I can see the editing of that from this book since we have two detective stories already.

The last story I finished in this book was The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. Aside from the racism in the story (and Poe is now dead and he wrote in the 1800's, so nothing can now be done about that) it's an interesting narrative about a man on a boat heading to the Antarctic. There's perhaps too much seafaring detail in there for my tastes. The ending to that story is definitely unsatisfying. I also got a good sense of 19th values toward "conquering the world" reading this narrative.

It seemed like the majority of the stories mention the words "opium" and "ague" at least once. I got to the point where I started looking for the first mention of opium and ague every time I started a new story.

I also get the feeling that being buried alive was one of Poe's worst nightmares. I think that was a general feeling of the population during that time in history.

*****

I have just found out Jules Verne wrote a sequel to Arthur Gordon Pym called An Antarctic Mystery. I am glad. Very glad. I have requested it from the library and hope to read it sometime soon. ( )
  Chica3000 | Dec 11, 2020 |



Published in 1850, Edgar Allan Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart is one of the best known and most memorable short stories ever written. Since there are dozens of commentaries and reviews here and elsewhere on the internet, in the spirit of freshness, I will take a particular focus: obsession with an eye or eyes and compare Poe’s tale with a few others.

In The Painter of Eyes by Jean Richepin, we encounter an obscure artist who sells his soul to the Devil in order to paint at least one masterpiece. There is a bit of writing attached to the corner of his great painting that reads: “The Devil has informed me as to the secret of painting eyes. That secret consists of decanting the life from the models one wishes to represent and fixing that life on the canvas. In doing that, one slowly kills the people whose portrait one paints. It is sufficient for me to know that I have made this masterpiece. I commend my soul to the prayers, in case the Evil One does not leave me the time.” The writing ends abruptly since death strikes the artist in mid-sentence - his masterpiece is a self-portrait.

In The Gaze another story by Jean Richepin, the narrator peers through the window of a cell at a madman holding his arms spread, head uplifted, transfixed by a point on a wall near the ceiling. The doctor-alienist relates to the narrator how this inmate is obsessed with the gaze of eyes from an artist's portrait. "For there was something in that gaze, believe me, that could trouble not only the already-enfeebled brain of a man afflicted with general paralysis, but even a sound and solid mind." Turns out, the narrator discovers the doctor is also driven mad by these eyes. So much so, the doctor took a scissors to the painting. We read: “In front of me, a fragment of a painting, cut out of a canvas with scissors, showed me a pair of eyes: the eyes of the portrait that the alienist said that he had lacerated, the eyes darting that famous gaze – in which, indeed, the very soul of gold was alive.”

The Enigmatic Eye by Moacyr Scliar is a most imaginative tale of a wealthy old man who becomes infatuated with a portrait of an aristocratic gentleman in the town’s museum. And what makes this portrait so infatuating? Why, of course – the gaze of the right eye, which is truly enigmatic. The old man has his close friend steal the portrait from the museum so he can put it in his attic and sit in front of the painting, pondering the enigmatic gaze round the clock. The servants think the old man mad but he could care less – he has exactly what he wants – the portrait with its enigmatic eye right in his very own attic. Unfortunately, something unexpected happens. Due to the attic’s heat and light, the painting begins to fade and then, over time, vanishes. The old man concludes there is only one thing for him to do – he buys some brushes and oils and begins re-painting the portrait, starting with the enigmatic eye.

Turning now to Poe’s tale, the narrator insists he should not be taken for a madman; rather, he is dreadfully nervous causing his senses, especially his sense of hearing, to be heightened and sharpened. He goes on to convey how once the idea of killing the old man of the house entered his brain, he was haunted by the idea day and night. And why would he want to kill this old man, a man who never wronged him? We read, “I think it was his eye! Yes, it was this! He had the eye of a vulture – a pale blue eye, with a film over it.” What is it about a human eye, painted or real, when seen by someone who is mentally unstable? Perhaps part of the answer is given by contemporary Argentine author, Ernesto Sabato, when he says that hell is being the object of the gaze of another.

Every one of Poe’s sentence is sheer perfection, building tension and suspense. For example, we read how the narrator, lantern in hand, secretly peers in at the sleeping old man at midnight. But then, one night, a noise wakes the old man and he sits bolt upright in bed. And what does the narrator do? We read, “I resolved to open a little – a very, very little crevice in the lantern. So I opened it – you cannot imagine how stealthily, stealthily – until, at length a single dim ray, like the thread of the spider, shot from out the crevice and fell full upon the vulture eye. It was open – wide, wide open – and I grew furious as I gazed upon it. I saw it with perfect distinctness – all a dull blue, with a hideous veil over it that chilled the very marrow of my bones; but I could see nothing else of the old man’s face or person: for I had directed the ray as if by instinct, precisely upon the damned spot.”

Anybody familiar with the story knows the narrator’s actions and emotions escalate from this point. What I find particularly fascinating is how the narrator’s obsession and fixation with the eye, once there is no more eye to fixate upon, quickly shifts into a heightened sense of feeling and, of course, heightened hearing. What a tale; what an author – a masterpiece of suspense and horror.

*The quotes from the two tales by Jean Richepin are taken from The Crazy Corner a collection of stories translated by Brian Stableford and published by Black Coat Press.

( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |
1 of 5 stars2 of 5 stars3 of 5 stars[ 4 of 5 stars ]5 of 5 stars
Reading this was fine but only hearing Vincent Price do it can one fully appreciate it ( )
  LGandT | May 28, 2018 |
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Edgar Allan PoeHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Spitzweg, CarlUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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The Tell-Tale Heart: True!--nervous--very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am! but why will you say that I am mad?
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"Villains!" I shrieked, "dissemble no more! I admit the deed! Tear up the planks! Here, here! It is the bleating of his hideous heart!"
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The title page said this volume is based on the so called "Virginia" edition of 1902, that is "The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe" edited by James A. Harrison, Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., New York, 1902, (17 vol. )
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Edgar Allan Poe remains the unsurpassed master of works of mystery and madness in this outstanding collection of Poe's prose and poetry are sixteen of his finest tales, including "The Tell-Tale Heart", "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "William Wilson," "The Black Cat," "The Cask of Amontillado," and "Eleonora". Here too is a major selection of what Poe characterized as the passion of his life, his poems - "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," Ulalume," "Lenore," "The Bells," and more, plus his glorious prose poem "Silence - A Fable" and only full-length novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.

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