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In Search of Lost Time, Volume 5: The…
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In Search of Lost Time, Volume 5: The Captive, The Fugitive (Original 1923; 1993. Auflage)

von Marcel Proust (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,0092716,034 (4.32)45
Since the original, prewar translation there has been no completely new rendering of the French original into English. This translation brings to the fore a more sharply engaged, comic and lucid Proust. IN SEARCH OF LOST TIME is one of the greatest, most entertaining reading experiences in any language. As the great story unfolds from its magical opening scenes to its devastating end, it is the Penguin Proust that makes Proust accessible to a new generation. Each book is translated by a different, superb translator working under the general editorship of Professor Christopher Prendergast, University of Cambridge.… (mehr)
Mitglied:suedonym
Titel:In Search of Lost Time, Volume 5: The Captive, The Fugitive
Autoren:Marcel Proust (Autor)
Info:Modern Library (1993), 976 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
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Werk-Informationen

The Captive & The Fugitive: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. V (Modern Library Classics) (v. 5) von Marcel Proust (1923)

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  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
[review of The Fugitive.]

I think every reader of The Fugitive has the same feeling at the end: just one more book to go! It should be an exhilarating ride.

The first half of The Fugitive is about the aftermath of Albertine’s having finally left the narrator (sometimes called Marcel). He constantly thinks about her, spies on her, offers money to her relatives for her return (without calling the transaction a purchase). He still obsesses over her suspected attraction to women, and investigates whether she had such relationships. There is also an incident that is casually slipped in, where Marcel gets hauled into the police station on suspicion of pedophilia (!). He never says explicitly the age of the girl in question, or in what his behavior (“I held her on my knee” in this Enright translation) consisted, although implying that it was quite innocent.

Then a big thing happens that means Marcel won’t get her back. This is my major complaint about this book. I mean, I know that plotting is not Proust’s strong point, but couldn’t you (Proust) have come up with something better? Maybe Albertine dates around, maybe she quickly gets engaged to someone else, maybe she openly takes up with a woman as an “out” lesbian? These all would have been more interesting to see her do, and to see Marcel react to.

Instead, the actual plot device that Proust chooses seemed very artificial, a quick out, a sort of deus ex machina, where the author’s heavy hand is overly visible.

Later in the book, we finally get to see Marcel visit Venice. With his mother - a trip there with Albertine would have been a great joy to read about. I really loved this section, and would have enjoyed another 100 pages of Venice (instead of the hundreds of pages wasted at various dinner parties).

Finally, there is the marriage of Gilberte and Saint-Loup. Doesn’t this unite the Two Ways: Swann and Guermantes? If so, I would have thought to encounter it in the final volume. In any event, the union doesn’t seem so happy, as more revelations about Saint-Loup occur, disturbing revelations that are hurtful to Marcel (and Gilberte).

I’ll close with a beautiful passage, a long single sentence, that occurs near the end:

“It is the wisdom inspired by the Muse whom it is best to ignore for as long as possible if we wish to retain some freshness of impressions, some creative power, but whom even those who have ignored her meet in the evening of their lives in the nave of an old country church, at a point when suddenly they feel less susceptible to the eternal beauty expressed in the carvings on the altar than to the thought of the vicissitudes of fortune which those carvings have undergone, passing into a famous private collection or a chapel, from there to a museum, then returning at length to the church, or to the feeling that as they walk around it they may be treading upon a flagstone almost endowed with thought, which is made of the ashes of Arnauld or Pascal, or simply to deciphering (forming perhaps a mental picture of a fresh-faced country girl) on the brass plate of the wooden prie-dieu the names of the daughters of the squire or the notable - the Muse who has gathered up everything that the more exalted Muses of philosophy and art have rejected, everything that is not founded upon truth, everything that is merely contingent, but that reveals other laws as well: the Muse of History.” (p.918-9) ( )
  viscount | Apr 3, 2021 |
one more to go
  amoskovacs | Mar 24, 2021 |
Given a hard deadline by buying tickets to the recording of the Proust Backlisted podcast in Dec 2019, I read this one relatively quickly. Without that deadline I'm not sure I'd ever have finished it. Throughout The Prisoner the narrator (who is finally named as Marcel in this one, in case there was any remaining pretence of distance between author and narrator) is unhinged, jealous, obsessive and generally disagreeable. It's really frustrating and unpleasant to read.

The Fugitive is shorter and more contemplative, and involves a trip to Venice, I'm kind of struggling to remember much detail of it as I pushed straight through and onto the final volume. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Feb 22, 2020 |
Greatest novel ever. Really. Just read biography of Proust by Edmund White and want to read more supplementary material (and still haven't read final volume). Would reward rereading; ideally should also be read in one long gulp, not as I have (a volume a year).

A couple of high-level comments:
1. The narrator's obsessiveness re his love interests is frustrating, and one comes to feel that it's overdone. However, as far as I can tell, Proust was actually like that (though the novel is NOT a memoir). It helps me forgive the obsessiveness, as a literary matter, because it is actually true to the author's life.
2. Albertine, his primary love interest, is not drawn with the same specificity that other characters are. What is she like and why is the narrator so in love with her? It's a bit hard to say (and even her beauty mark wanders across her face in different parts of the novel). According to Edmund White, this vagueness is due to Proust having combined more than one real lover in the character of Albertine. Still a real flaw but one I somehow can forgive, now that I know the historical reason. ( )
  Robert_Musil | Dec 15, 2019 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (13 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Marcel ProustHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Collier, PeterÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Enright, D. J.Translation revisionCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Kilmartin, TerenceÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Scott-Moncrieff, C. K.ÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

Since the original, prewar translation there has been no completely new rendering of the French original into English. This translation brings to the fore a more sharply engaged, comic and lucid Proust. IN SEARCH OF LOST TIME is one of the greatest, most entertaining reading experiences in any language. As the great story unfolds from its magical opening scenes to its devastating end, it is the Penguin Proust that makes Proust accessible to a new generation. Each book is translated by a different, superb translator working under the general editorship of Professor Christopher Prendergast, University of Cambridge.

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