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Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and…
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Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and Redemption in an American Prison (2017. Auflage)

von Shaka Senghor (Autor)

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1296164,310 (4.28)1
"In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University of Michigan, a leading voice on criminal justice reform, and an inspiration to thousands. In life, it's not how you start that matters. It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit's east side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor--but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel and the beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, and self-examination, tools that he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age 38, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. Writing My Wrongs is a redemption story told through a stunningly human portrait of what it's like to grow up in the gravitational pull of poverty, violence, fear, and hopelessness. It's an unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and unconditional love, for reaching those whom society has forgotten"-- "In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University of Michigan. In life, it's not how you start that matters. It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit's eastside during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor--but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel and the beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, and self-examination, tools that he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age 38, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. Writing My Wrongs is a redemption story told through a stunningly human portrait of what it's like to grow up in the gravitational pull of poverty, violence, fear, and hopelessness. It's an unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and unconditional love"--… (mehr)
Mitglied:CPI
Titel:Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and Redemption in an American Prison
Autoren:Shaka Senghor (Autor)
Info:Convergent Books (2017), Edition: Reprint, 288 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
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Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and Redemption in an American Prison von Shaka Senghor

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This is an interesting book with a solid storyline. The author is believable, honest and very detailed. It's a story I could not connect with, though I welcomed seeing a candid view into what life can be for some of the youth in our communities. His background, crimes, and path to redemption at the end are covered well. It might even make a good movie, but it's not a book I could easily recommend to any of my friends. I appreciate his candor and his writing is solid.
  cmelitawebb | Jan 24, 2019 |
I listened to this on audio, read by Shaka himself. While the writing was, at times, a bit wobbly with an over-reliance on creative writing class similes, Shaka's voice is powerful, and his story even more so. He details his coming of age in Detroit, how he became entangled in the drug trade and violence of the 1980s, and how he killed a man and went to prison for it, serving 19 years, seven of them in solitary confinement.

He writes about his anger, first at other people and the system, and then at himself (but also at the system which is certainly justified). He is clear-eyed and honest about his culpability, but the portrait of the prison system that he experienced is grim and horrifying. Ultimately, while Shaka's story is one of redemption, second chances, and making good, what will probably stay with me most after reading this memoir is the anger and frustration I feel at a society that fails under-privileged children on so many levels and then tosses them away like so much trash when they become adults.

4 sad and angry stars ( )
  katiekrug | Aug 10, 2018 |
Shaka Sengor was guilty. He killed a man in cold blood during a dispute over a drugs. He was convicted of murder in the second degree and went to prison for fifteen to fourty years. For much of his sentence he was not a model inmate. He had a botched escape attempt under his belt. He spent time in solitary (the hole) for assaulting prison guards. But during his nineteen years in prison he was transformed through reading, spiritual practice, and ultimately by writing his wrongs: practicing the cathartic self reflection of journaling, writing fiction and letters.

27297084Despite Sengor's guilt, don't think for a moment that he wasn't a victim. Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death, and Redemption in an American Prison tells the story of his childhood, his experience of abuse, and his broken home, and how he was seduced into the drug trade. It also tells the story of the anger and fear he felt when he was shot as a seventeen year old and the lack of compassion he experienced from physicians and law enforcement. The experience made him afraid and angry enough to carry a gun. At nineteen, he killed a man aduring a drug transaction (Senghor was a crack dealer).

The injustice Senghor faced inside Michigan's prisons is harrowing. He was the victim of systemic injustice and racism from prison guards. He witnessed the horrows of prison rape. He participated in violence. He experienced the psychological wounding of four-and-a-half years in solitary confinement after he assaulted a guard (his confrontation with the guard was a n0-win-situation).

Ultimately this book is a story of hope. Senghor comes to own his past, and the things he did wrong. He doesn't make excuses for himself, but sets out to make amends through writing, community activism and mentoring youth. He finds love with an ctivist he begins a correspondence with. His transformation began mid-way through his prison sentence when the godmother of his victim wrote to him asking the why question. Senghor wrote back his regret and she forgave him. That began a correspondence (described in the prologue and afterword of this book). That set the stage for Senghor to grow and change.

I like memoirs and this is a good one. It is a compelling story. I recommend the book, but issues caution to readers which would be disturbed by violence (and language). Some of the events described are ugly: rape, feces fights, violence, abject racism. This may be difficult for some readers to take. Other books, such as Michelle Alexander,s The New Jim Crow or Bryan Stevenson's Just Mercy tell the tale of of our broken legal system. This is an insider's experience. I give this book four stars.

Note: I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for my honest review. ( )
  Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
In this candid, emotional, and thought-provoking memoir, Shaka Senghor tells his story about his childhood, family life, imprisonment, and finally his redemption. His writing is insightful, thought-provoking, and offers encouragement and hope to those who find themselves imprisoned. Highly recommended. ( )
  AdwoaCamaraIfe | Aug 3, 2016 |
A wonderful and inspiring read about what it takes to pick yourself back up and make a difference. Convicted of murder at the age of nineteen, Shaka realized that he would be facing nearly two decades behind bars. He wouldn't get to raise either of his kids, and he knew that he was straining his relationship with his family. How had it gone downhill so fast? Shaka examines his life up until the moment he fired his gun and analyzes what he was going through, what he could have done, and how it set him up for life in prison. His prison experiences are harrowing to say the least. The rape, shankings, emotional abuse, and degradation sound almost unbearable, but after many years and a lot of soul searching, Shaka was able to think positively about his life and future and tried to help others locked up with him to do the same by being a mentor and leader. After his release, Shaka remained true to his word and set out to make a difference to those living in the slums of Detroit. He's an empowering speaker, dedicated father, and proof that we all have the power to turn our lives around. An emotional and necessary read!

I received this book for free from Blogging for Books in return for my honest, unbiased opinion. ( )
  ecataldi | May 23, 2016 |
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"In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University of Michigan, a leading voice on criminal justice reform, and an inspiration to thousands. In life, it's not how you start that matters. It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit's east side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor--but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel and the beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, and self-examination, tools that he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age 38, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. Writing My Wrongs is a redemption story told through a stunningly human portrait of what it's like to grow up in the gravitational pull of poverty, violence, fear, and hopelessness. It's an unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and unconditional love, for reaching those whom society has forgotten"-- "In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University of Michigan. In life, it's not how you start that matters. It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit's eastside during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor--but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel and the beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, and self-examination, tools that he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age 38, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. Writing My Wrongs is a redemption story told through a stunningly human portrait of what it's like to grow up in the gravitational pull of poverty, violence, fear, and hopelessness. It's an unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and unconditional love"--

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