StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Mountain Chef: How One Man Lost His…
Lädt ...

Mountain Chef: How One Man Lost His Groceries, Changed His Plans, and… (2019. Auflage)

von Annette Bay Pimentel (Autor), Rich Lo (Illustrator)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
409509,395 (3.88)Keine
The true story of a Chinese American mountain man who fed thirty people for ten days in the wilderness--and helped inspire the creation of the National Park Service.   Tie Sing was born in the mountains. The mountains were in his blood. But because he was of Chinese descent at a time in America when to be Chinese meant working in restaurants or laundries, Tie Sing's prospects were limited. But he had bigger plans. He began cooking for mapmakers and soon built a reputation as the best trail cook in California.   When millionaire Stephen Mather began his quest to create a national park service in 1915, he invited a group of influential men--writers, tycoons, members of Congress, and even a movie star--to go camping in the Sierras. Tie Sing was hired to cook.   Tie Sing planned diligently. He understood the importance of this trip. But when disaster struck--twice!--and Tie Sing's supplies were lost, it was his creative spirit and quick mind that saved the day. His sumptuous menus had to be struck and Tie Sing had to start over in order to feed the thirty people in the group for ten whole days. His skills were tested and Tie Sing rose to the challenge.   On the last night, he fed not just the campers' bodies, but also their minds, reminding them to remember and protect the mountains.   2016 marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, created by Congress on August 25, 1916.   Today, you can hike to Sing Peak, named for Tie Sing, in Yosemite National Park.… (mehr)
Mitglied:PeytonColeJones
Titel:Mountain Chef: How One Man Lost His Groceries, Changed His Plans, and Helped Cook Up the National Park Service
Autoren:Annette Bay Pimentel (Autor)
Weitere Autoren:Rich Lo (Illustrator)
Info:Charlesbridge (2019), Edition: Reprint, 40 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:****
Tags:history, national park, educational, non-fiction

Werk-Informationen

Mountain Chef: How One Man Lost His Groceries, Changed His Plans, and Helped Cook Up the National Park Service von Annette Bay Pimentel

Keine
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Keine aktuelle Diskussion zu diesem Buch.

This story about Chinese American Chef Tie Sing, who cooked for the Mather Mountain Party of influential conservationists, is a fascinating romp into one of the lesser known stories of the creation of the National Parks Service. Additional Materials, Historic Photos, Source Notes, Bibliography, Map.
  NCSS | Jul 23, 2021 |
This is a true story of a Chinese American man during a time in America when Chinese people were ostracized because of their origin. Despite the ostracizing the Chinese American man felt during this time, because of his diligence today a peak is named in his honor at Yosemite National Park. This book that is based on a true story relays a great story that is a part of our history. It conveys the theme of overcoming hard situations in life. ( )
  PeytonColeJones | Apr 18, 2021 |
Published in 2016, on the centennial of the founding of the National Park Service here in the United States, this picture-book biography from author Annette Bay Pimentel and illustrator Rich Lo tells the story of Tie Sing (sometimes Ty Sing), a celebrated Chinese-American trail cook, for whom Sing Peak, in the Sierra National Forest, is named. Born in Nevada, Tie Sing lived during a time when opportunities for people of Chinese descent were quite limited. Having no desire to work in a laundry, he became a trail cook, and eventually gained such a good reputation in the field that he was recommended as the cook for Stephen Mather's important 1915 camping trip, during which many influential people were taken on a tour of the Sierra Nevada wilderness, in order to convince them to support the founding of a National Park Service. Although he encountered many challenges and obstacles along the way, Sing always persevered, and was fondly remembered by many of the men who were on the trip. One of those men was Robert Marshall, a chief geographer with the USGS (The United States Geological Survey) at the time, who named Sing Peak in the trail cook's honor...

I found the story in Mountain Chef: How One Man Lost His Groceries, Changed His Plans, and Helped Cook Up the National Park Service absolutely fascinating, and commend Pimentel for all the research she did, in order to tell this story of a man who may not have been famous in his day, but who played an important role at a pivotal moment in the development of our National Park system. The afterword gives more information about Sing, who apparently worked for the USGS for thirty years, and who tragically died in a mountain accident in 1918, just three years after the events described in the main narrative here. It is humbling to realize how much Sing loved America, and its wild places, in light of the racism and discrimination that he and other Chinese-Americans faced during this period. Whatever the general attitude in society at the time, it was good to learn that many of the members of Mather's trip were impressed by Sing's patriotism, and considered him a "true American." The accompanying artwork from Rich Lo, done in pencil and watercolor, is expressive and appealing. Recommended to picture-book readers who enjoy biography, or who are looking for stories about Asian-American pioneers and/or the early history of the Park Service. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Feb 6, 2021 |
This is a picture book biography about Tie Sing, a Chinese American man who was the best trail cook in California. He was hired to cooke for an expedition that was meant to develop support for the National Park system. Of course being out on the trails, things are bound to go wrong and they did for Tie Sing, but he never gave up and always made the most of it. It's a story of inventiveness and problem solving. The water colour illustrations are wonderful. The back of the book includes mini biographies of the characters in the story and answers other questions the reader may have about Tie Sing and this expedition.

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  Carlathelibrarian | Feb 5, 2019 |
This is a non-fiction biography for kids about Tie Sing, the man who “helped cook up the National Park Service.”

Tie Sing was born in Virginia City, Nevada, “a tough place to be Chinese.” He grew up to be a chef who loved to hike as well as to create gourmet meals. He got a job cooking for mapmakers, for whom he “stirred silky sauces, broiled succulent steaks . … and baked sourdough rolls as light as the clouds drifting above the peaks.” His reputation grew as the best trail cook in California.

In 1913 Tie Sing was hired by a millionaire to accompany tycoons and members of Congress on a camping trip in what is now the Yosemite National Park, to promote the idea of a national park service. On the trail, Tie Sing, along with an assistant, created epicurean meals for the thirty people on the trip. They served gourmet meals "as fine as any you’d find in a San Francisco restaurant” on linen tablecloths with fine china plates and thick cloth napkins.

One day the mule carrying their fanciest food wandered off and could not be found. Tie Sing had to improvise. Then on another day a second mule tumbled off a narrow ridge and more food and kitchen gear were lost. Again he had to brainstorm to make up for the losses.

And on the last night, he came up with an even better idea “to fill the campers with memories.” He wrote on tiny slips of paper, and inserted them into cookies: “fortune cookies.” The messages promoted the beauty of the mountains: “Long may you search the mountains.” “Long may you build the paths through the mountains. “Where but in the mountains would such a man become a spirit with the mountains?”

The men were duly impressed by the experience, and, as the author recounts:

“On August 25, 1916, exactly one year, one month, and one day after Tie Sing served his fortune cookies, Congress created the National Park Service.”

In Tie Sing’s honor, one of the peaks in Yosemite National park was named Sing Peak.

An extensive section at the end of the book called “What You May Be Wondering” fills in more information about Tie Sing, and features some actual photos. The author tells us that Tie Sing worked for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as a trail cook for thirty years, and was killed in a mountain accident in 1918. She also fills in background on the discrimination against ethnic Chinese in the United States at the time. Short biographies provide the backgrounds of some of the men who went on the trip to promote the National Park Service. She concludes with a selected biography and source notes.

[Note: while the author doesn’t address the origins of the fortune cookies, Tie Sing did not invent the idea. Although both Japanese and Chinese immigrants claimed credit for inventing them (or more accurately, for bringing the idea to America), it is generally conceded that whoever came up with the idea first popularized it in San Francisco in the late 19th or early 20th century.]

Rich Lo created lovely pencil and watercolor illustrations, some of which are based on the historical photos, to help tell the story. The endpapers are illustrated with a map of the trip described in the book. Lo is not only an award-winning illustrator of kids’ books, but he creates public art.

Evaluation: This story seamlessly combines several histories in one: the creation of the National Park Service; what camping on the trail was like before the service; and the racial discrimination against people of Chinese heritage. There is a message in the story for thoughtful readers, but it is not made explicit or forcefully. The story is unique, interesting and entertaining. ( )
  nbmars | Apr 21, 2018 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Annette Bay PimentelHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Lo, RichIllustratorCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

The true story of a Chinese American mountain man who fed thirty people for ten days in the wilderness--and helped inspire the creation of the National Park Service.   Tie Sing was born in the mountains. The mountains were in his blood. But because he was of Chinese descent at a time in America when to be Chinese meant working in restaurants or laundries, Tie Sing's prospects were limited. But he had bigger plans. He began cooking for mapmakers and soon built a reputation as the best trail cook in California.   When millionaire Stephen Mather began his quest to create a national park service in 1915, he invited a group of influential men--writers, tycoons, members of Congress, and even a movie star--to go camping in the Sierras. Tie Sing was hired to cook.   Tie Sing planned diligently. He understood the importance of this trip. But when disaster struck--twice!--and Tie Sing's supplies were lost, it was his creative spirit and quick mind that saved the day. His sumptuous menus had to be struck and Tie Sing had to start over in order to feed the thirty people in the group for ten whole days. His skills were tested and Tie Sing rose to the challenge.   On the last night, he fed not just the campers' bodies, but also their minds, reminding them to remember and protect the mountains.   2016 marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, created by Congress on August 25, 1916.   Today, you can hike to Sing Peak, named for Tie Sing, in Yosemite National Park.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.88)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5 2
4 6
4.5
5

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,390,623 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar