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The Graveyard Apartment: A Novel von Mariko…
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The Graveyard Apartment: A Novel (Original 1993; 2016. Auflage)

von Mariko Koike (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
2221795,692 (3.27)29
"One of the most popular writers working in Japan today, Mariko Koike is a recognized master of detective fiction and horror writing. Known in particular for her hybrid works that blend these styles with elements of romance, The Graveyard Apartment is arguably Koike's masterpiece. Originally published in Japan in 1986, Koike's novel is the suspenseful tale of a young family that believes it has found the perfect home to grow into, only to realize that the apartment's idyllic setting harbors the specter of evil and that longer they stay, the more trapped they become. This tale of a young married couple who harbor a dark secret is packed with dread and terror, as they and their daughter move into a brand new apartment building built next to a graveyard. As strange and terrifying occurrences begin to pile up, people in the building start to move out one by one, until the young family is left alone with someone... or something... lurking in the basement. The psychological horror builds moment after moment, scene after scene, culminating with a conclusion that will make you think twice before ever going into a basement again"--… (mehr)
Mitglied:ellehaze
Titel:The Graveyard Apartment: A Novel
Autoren:Mariko Koike (Autor)
Info:Thomas Dunne Books (2016), Edition: Translation, 336 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek, Noch zu lesen
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Tags:to-read

Werk-Details

The Graveyard Apartment von Mariko Koike (1993)

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Man, this was really my jam. It was a little slow-going, which I honestly don't mind because I like creepy horror more than in-your-face horror, and a little stiff at times, which might be more of a translation issue, but I find the idea of being trapped in a familiar place uniquely terrifying. I don't really find the idea of living next to a cemetery inherently frightening--I've never lived right next to a cemetery but I can see one if I go to the end of my street and it's never left an impression on me--but I do love (in a spooky way) the idea of being trapped in my house. Honestly this book probably worked better for me after 2020 since I did feel like I was trapped in my house for months. The idea of waking up one morning and not being able to open my front door or break open my windows or call someone for help--that's some good shit right there. How long would it take for someone to notice that I was missing (hopefully not long)? What if they couldn't get me out? I spent some time near the end of the book looking around my kitchen and trying to think of how long I could live if I couldn't leave (thanks to Covid, I'm honestly pretty well-stocked to survive for a few weeks). The ending--eh, I don't mind not getting closure. The Kanos probably die and we never learn what exactly was happening but I don't think an answer would be more satisfying. It was probably demons or ghosts. You know, supernatural spooky shit. ( )
  jobinsonlis | May 11, 2021 |
2.5 stars ( )
  moonlit.shelves | Oct 12, 2020 |
Overall, this book was pretty good. It wasn't super-spooky, but I sat up late to read the whole thing in one sitting (with a break to put the kids to bed) because it was easy to read and because I found the deeper issues in the novel compelling.

There were no huge surprises, horror-wise---an apartment next to a graveyard, misbehaving electronics, weird noises, spooky happenings, a trip to check out city records about the history of the site. There were some things that were unclear or just dropped without further explanation, like the bird and the dark little figures. Some of the language was cliched or otherwise uninteresting, but I have a higher tolerance for this sort of thing in a translation. I found myself wanting to ask my friends who speak/read Japanese to read this and tell me if the word choice was any more skillful in the original Japanese.

One of the biggest things that gave me trouble was that the motivation of the antagonist(s) was unclear. Did they want to drive out the tenants (if so, why make it difficult to leave)? Did they want to kill the tenants (if so, why drag it out)? Are they targeting the one family specifically (if so, why all the collateral damage)? As another reviewer mentions, are they the spirits of dead people or are they malevolent spirits of some other, mythological type? Are they limited in power, as the beginning of the book suggests, or are they omnipotent, as they seem to be by the end (although they apparently still need the elevator)? It seems like the author can't decide.

Two things kept me interested in this novel. First, the author did an excellent job of maintaining suspense. The action took almost too long for me, but not quite. That's good suspense.

Second, there's this intersection of the personal haunted past of the main family in the story and the haunting of the building. They've attempted to ignore the things haunting them the way they try to keep living in the apartment building after some really scary---and dangerous---stuff starts happening. Even when things get really bad, their major concern is practical---how to have enough food---not how to address the issue directly and solve it. They get indications from their neighbor, from their daughter, and from some odd stuff related to a Buddhist altar they've neglected, but it's almost like they're so accustomed to accepting their punishment, of feeling like they deserve whatever's coming to them because of the guilt and shame they feel for past mistakes, that they can neither save themselves and nor avoid dragging others they love into the danger. That just might explain why they keep using the elevator even when I keep yelling at them in my mind, "Just use the stairs already!" It reminds me of how I feel when I'm dealing with people stuck in patterns of behavior that no longer serve them and that are leading them towards a cliff (or at least in circles). I get stuck in those patterns, too, but it's much easier to see and critique them in other people. With subtlety, the author manages to connect the behavior and the danger not only to the main characters' past but to the historical past of the country of Japan. It left me thinking of the patterns of behavior in the United States that lead us to make self-defeating decisions as a nation.

This is what keeps me in horror novels. The spooky stuff is titillating and after I've closed the book, it's fun, in a way, to try to keep myself from running down the dark hallway to my bedroom, sure there are unseen things following me, but the meat of a horror story for me is how it reflects the deep-down fears we have in real life. In this novel, it's the fear of our past and our feelings of shame and guilt and how this fear can follow us over time and geography, blind us to self-reflection, and perpetuate patterns of behavior that are dangerous to ourselves and that draw others into danger as well. In that sense, we all live in a graveyard apartment. ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Jun 28, 2020 |
Enjoyed this, but it wasn't nearly as scary as I expected it to be. That could be due to translation. ( )
  bookswithmom | Dec 18, 2019 |
5 stars for creepiness and superb nail-biting tension. But no stars for plot cheats and the weak characters, specifically, dumb actions/ choices/ decisions from otherwise seemingly intelligent people. So, rating-wise, it'd land somewhere in the middle. And while I wouldn't necessarily read this again (for entertainment purposes), I had a fun edge-of-my-seat good time.

Read this if you like nearly vacant apartment buildings; the thought of living surrounded by a graveyard; an elevator that sometimes strands tenants in the basement; and, a basement in which lurks something with malicious plans.
  flying_monkeys | Sep 30, 2019 |
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AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Mariko KoikeHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Boehm, Deborah BoliverÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Boehm, Deborah BoliverÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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"One of the most popular writers working in Japan today, Mariko Koike is a recognized master of detective fiction and horror writing. Known in particular for her hybrid works that blend these styles with elements of romance, The Graveyard Apartment is arguably Koike's masterpiece. Originally published in Japan in 1986, Koike's novel is the suspenseful tale of a young family that believes it has found the perfect home to grow into, only to realize that the apartment's idyllic setting harbors the specter of evil and that longer they stay, the more trapped they become. This tale of a young married couple who harbor a dark secret is packed with dread and terror, as they and their daughter move into a brand new apartment building built next to a graveyard. As strange and terrifying occurrences begin to pile up, people in the building start to move out one by one, until the young family is left alone with someone... or something... lurking in the basement. The psychological horror builds moment after moment, scene after scene, culminating with a conclusion that will make you think twice before ever going into a basement again"--

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