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Ödipus auf Kolonos.

von Sophocles

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

Reihen: Oedipus Cycle (2)

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The latest title to join the acclaimed Greek Tragedy in New Translations series, Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus tells the story of the last day in the life of Oedipus. It was written at the end of the fifth century BCE in Athens, in the final years of the "Golden Age" of Athenian culture, andin the last year of Sophocles' own life. At the center of the play is the mysterious transformation of Oedipus from an old and blind beggar, totally dependent on his daughters, to the man who rises from his seat and, without help, leads everyone to the place where he is destined to die. In thebackground of this transformation stands the grove of the Furies, the sacred place of the implacable goddesses who pursue the violators of blood relationships. Although Oedipus, who killed his father and married his mother, is an obvious target of the Furies' vengeance, he enters their grove at thebeginning of the play, sure that it is the resting place Apollo has predicted for him. The reversals and paradoxes in the play speak to the struggle that Oedipus' life and the action of the play bring vividly before us: how do we as humans, subject to constant change, find stable ground on which tostand and define our moral lives? Sophocles offers his play as a witness to the remarkable human capacity to persevere in this struggle.… (mehr)
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Fall 2018, Teacher Read:

My Seniors are doing Oedipus, and my Sophomores are doing Antigone, and it seemed fitting that I should read the whole Theban Trilogy again since my daily life is half-immersed within it currently. I, honestly, couldn't remember if I had to read this one in college or not.

I know I didn't read it before then, and so I decided to read the middle play this year. As Oedipus falls, Theseus and Oedipus's son rise, while his daughters take a slowly greater role. I can't help laughing a little that Oedipus' death is off screen and basically a 'miracle we can not speak of.' ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
Oedipus at Colonus

The final chapter of the Theban Plays opens with old, weathered Oedipus arriving just outside of glorious Athens. Alongside him is his faithful daughter Antigone, who has been his guiding eyes ever since he took his own years ago. They end their trip directly in front of a sacred forest, where the Furies are worshipped. This is the site of Oepidus' final resting place, according to the prophecy that was told to him. He has been searching for this very spot for many years.

Multiple characters come on the scene and this is where the audience witnesses the fierceness and cutting anger that stirs inside Oedipus' heart. He has a good amount of indignation pent up after so many years, and his words come in the form of daggers which strike and stab his own son Polynices and his brother-in-law/uncle Creon. He doesn't hold back.

I found this play exciting and enthralling. The monologues were great and full of energy. The ending itself was great, with one of the most powerful gods letting his presence known. I enjoyed Oedipus the King greatly, and Oedipus at Colonus is a close second. Antigone was okay, but I have to reread it and see how I feel afterwards. ( )
1 abstimmen ProfessorEX | Apr 15, 2021 |
This is Sophocles' last written play, though the second in his Theban plays sequence. It chronicles Oedipus and Antigone's exile, though it is very heavy on chorus and monologue. I found it interesting as a set of ideas, but not so much as a play. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
A straightforward romp, the second in The Oedipus Cycle, detailing the journey-- both internal and external, that Oedipus makes. It was entertaining and there were many good passages and lines to behold. Nevertheless, it came off as a little basic but that might be part of its charm.

3 stars! ( )
  DanielSTJ | Jan 14, 2020 |
Look, I really like Mulroy’s translations, but this is such an opaque play. There are little hints of an interesting plot there (the start of Seven Against Thebes, basically), but it’s like Sophocles is trying to make a very different point. Oedipus just isn’t an interesting enough character to carry a whole play. ( )
  NKarman | Mar 20, 2018 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (73 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
SophoclesAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Buschor, ErnstÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Fitzgerald, RobertÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Grennan, EamonÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Jebb, Richard ClaverhouseÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Kitzinger, RachelÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Masqueray, PaulÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Nucciotti, AngeloHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

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The latest title to join the acclaimed Greek Tragedy in New Translations series, Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus tells the story of the last day in the life of Oedipus. It was written at the end of the fifth century BCE in Athens, in the final years of the "Golden Age" of Athenian culture, andin the last year of Sophocles' own life. At the center of the play is the mysterious transformation of Oedipus from an old and blind beggar, totally dependent on his daughters, to the man who rises from his seat and, without help, leads everyone to the place where he is destined to die. In thebackground of this transformation stands the grove of the Furies, the sacred place of the implacable goddesses who pursue the violators of blood relationships. Although Oedipus, who killed his father and married his mother, is an obvious target of the Furies' vengeance, he enters their grove at thebeginning of the play, sure that it is the resting place Apollo has predicted for him. The reversals and paradoxes in the play speak to the struggle that Oedipus' life and the action of the play bring vividly before us: how do we as humans, subject to constant change, find stable ground on which tostand and define our moral lives? Sophocles offers his play as a witness to the remarkable human capacity to persevere in this struggle.

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