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Der Tempelbrand

von Yukio Mishima

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
2,002416,253 (3.81)1 / 99
Because of the boyhood trauma of seeing his mother make love to another man in the presence of his dying father, Mizoguchi becomes a hopeless stutterer. Taunted by his schoolmates, he feels utterly alone until he becomes an acolyte at a famous temple in Kyoto. He quickly becomes obsessed with the beauty of the temple. Even when tempted by a friend into exploring the geisha district, he cannot escape its image. In the novel's soaring climax, he tries desperately to free himself from his fixation.… (mehr)
  1. 00
    After the Banquet von Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Another Mishima novel that he based on a real event.
  2. 00
    Silk and Insight von Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Another Mishima novel based on a real event.
  3. 00
    The Age of Blue von Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Written in the same decade, but was based around a different real-life crime.
  4. 00
    Kaltblütig von Truman Capote (GYKM)
    GYKM: Like Truman Capote ten years later, Mishima not only conducted research into the crime that he would base his psychological novel on, but he also interviewed the arsonist.
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I'm not too sure when or where this book came into my awareness but I have had it sitting on my bookcase for a few months now. I had initially planned to read Confessions of a Mask first because that was the first Mishima book which caught my attention but I felt drawn to this as my next read. I wasn't too sure whether the synopsis was something that would appeal to me but I was intrigued as to why Haruki Murakami dislikes the work on Mishima so much.

Although it is not a big book I found it slow going especially in the early chapters. I really didn't like the character of Mizoguchi and in truth I found him quite annoying. I felt similar about him as I did with Holden Caulfield when I read Catcher in the Rye, perhaps he is a character that suits younger readers more? I did find that Kashiwaga grew on me a bit despite the fact that he was portrayed as an unlikeable person, I think I felt that he was truer to life that Mizoguchi.

Another bugbear I had with the book is that it seemed to take forever to get to the conclusion of the story. I wasn't aware that the book was based on true events and so I found the build up to the climax pretty laborious. However, as the conclusion got close I started to like the book a bit more.

At the end of the day I think that this might be a bit of a love it or hate it book for a lot of people. I wouldn't go so far as to say I hated it but it didn't move me either. It was an ok read but for me nothing more than that. I am hoping that Confessions of a Mask is a bit more my kind of thing, the synopsis seems to fit me better. ( )
  Brian. | Jul 23, 2021 |
Mishima's mastery in constructing the pathology of the main character, Mizoguchi, raises disturbing questions about emotional dependence, alienation, the value of art and inheritance and the role that childhood experiences and traumas play in distorting adult behavior.

Was it the ostentation of the building, the envy of his adoration by the public or a destructive whim in the mind of an acolyte steeped in doctrine but forced to live in the present material that brought up the pyromaniac in it? ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Feb 24, 2021 |
Desde mi más tierna infancia, mi padre, muchas veces me habló del Pabellón del Oro. Nací al noroeste de Maizuru...
  socogarv | Feb 5, 2021 |
Mizoguchi, in his teens at the end of the war, feels he's been betrayed in just about every possible direction. By both his parents, by his religious superior, by his male friends, by women, and — of course — by the state that entered and lost the war and has left him open to humiliation at the hands of American soldiers. He stutters, he's perpetually hungry, he isn't very interested in his studies to become a Zen priest, and he's convinced that he's ugly. So, your typical happy teenage boy! By a logical process that makes complete sense to him, and apparently also to the author, he comes to the view that the only thing left for him to do is to destroy the beautiful thing that seems to be at the focal point of the values of all those lines of betrayal.

This is obviously a book that has all the elements of the postwar-adolescent-rebellion novel, and is a kind of apotheosis of the twentieth century Japanese classic (temples, voyeurism, humiliation, duckweed, tea, tatami mats, suicide, mountains, ...). It's all beautifully and very concisely executed, but it can't get round the limitation that any reader who isn't a teenager at the end of his tether is likely to see Mizoguchi's solution as both irrelevant and disproportionate to the problem he's facing. ( )
  thorold | Aug 17, 2020 |
I think I'm finally figuring out Yukio's 'move' as it were. At the end of his stories, the male character is alone, on the street, injured, and desperately, violently, alive. ( )
  adaorhell | Aug 2, 2020 |
"An amazing literary feat in its minute delineation of a neurotic personality."
hinzugefügt von GYKM | bearbeitenChicago Tribune
 
"Beautifully translated... Mishima re-erects Kyoto, plain and mountain, monastery, temple, town, as Victor Hugo made Paris out of Notre Dame."
hinzugefügt von GYKM | bearbeitenThe Nation
 
"One of the few genuinely surprising, subtle, complex and profound novels of ideas to have appeared since Man’s Fate" […] "Mishima has fashioned a wildly original, paradoxical series of clashing meditations and actions"
hinzugefügt von GYKM | bearbeitenHudson Review, Sidney Monas
 
In July, 1950, art lovers were shocked to hear that the Kinkakuji--the Temple of the Golden Pavilion--in Kyoto had been deliberately burned by a crazed young monk. At his trial, this ugly, stammering priest said that his hatred of all beauty had driven him to destroy the six-century-old building. He expressed no regrets.

From this incident and other details of his life an engrossing novel has been written by Yukio Mishima.
hinzugefügt von jlelliott | bearbeitenThe New York Times, Donald Keene (May 31, 1959)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (11 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Mishima, YukioHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Morris, IvanÜbersetzerHauptautoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Komatsu, FumiIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ouwehand, C.EinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ouwehand, C.ÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ross, Nancy WilsonEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Ever since my childhood, Father had often spoken to me about the Golden Temple.
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When you meet the Buddha, kill the Buddha.
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What transforms this world is—knowledge.
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Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

Because of the boyhood trauma of seeing his mother make love to another man in the presence of his dying father, Mizoguchi becomes a hopeless stutterer. Taunted by his schoolmates, he feels utterly alone until he becomes an acolyte at a famous temple in Kyoto. He quickly becomes obsessed with the beauty of the temple. Even when tempted by a friend into exploring the geisha district, he cannot escape its image. In the novel's soaring climax, he tries desperately to free himself from his fixation.

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Durchschnitt: (3.81)
0.5
1 6
1.5 1
2 19
2.5 9
3 78
3.5 21
4 131
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