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Messy: How to Be Creative and Resilient in a…
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Messy: How to Be Creative and Resilient in a Tidy-Minded World (2018. Auflage)

von Tim Harford (Autor)

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2851273,161 (3.77)6
Messiness adds benefits to our lives, so why do we resist the concept so? Harford uses research from neuroscience, psychology and social science to explain why disorder, confusion, and disarray are actually lies at the core of how we innovate, how we achieve, how we reach each other. He shows that the human inclination for tidiness can mask a deep and debilitating fragility that keep us from innovation.… (mehr)
Mitglied:sophie.hylands
Titel:Messy: How to Be Creative and Resilient in a Tidy-Minded World
Autoren:Tim Harford (Autor)
Info:Abacus (2018), 336 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:2019, Male Author, Non-Fiction, 2010s

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Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives von Tim Harford

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Well written anecdotes around the title subject. I like popular history, but there's a limit to the number of these kind of business books I can read. Also not really in the mood to hear about the orange fucker in the primary. ( )
  brett.sovereign | Jul 10, 2021 |
"we are always reaching for tidy answers, only to find that they're of little use when the questions get messy." (258)

It's funny; I've read so many of these books that I have become familiar with the stories it uses: Jane Jacobs, Flight 447, Amazon, Rommel, and so on. Unlike some of the others (The Checklist Manifesto, for instance), the argument is not for making things more orderly, but for accepting messiness and its virtues. The book is highly readable and entertaining, and it makes some good points, though I cannot stand having piles of papers around even though I know perfectly well that my filing system is where papers go to die. The human urge for order is not something you can just deny out-of-hand, no matter how counterproductive it may be.

I recommend it. It's not intensely deep, but it has many interesting ideas. ( )
  dmturner | Jun 29, 2020 |
I like Tim Harford's books. He makes economics fun for those of us who wonder about it but don't care about the maths.
I admit I picked this up because I am chronically messy and have the guilt trip about it especially with Marie Kondo currently adding to it.
I feel a lot less guilt about it now and if Harford is right my way of filing anywhere and everywhere on my desk etc. is actually more efficient than putting it all away. I'll take that. ( )
  infjsarah | Jun 18, 2020 |
My desk is a mess. I have a laptop, a second screen, keyboard, a task light and a lava lamp, a stationary rack and pencil holder, scrap paper and a pad to write on, as well as 18 books and various other items of detritus. To be honest, it could do with a bit of a tidy up. One day I will…

Most people want a tidy place to work in. Some businesses are really strict on this, enforcing numerous draconian rules as to what you can or can’t have on your desk, the number of personal photos allowed and so on. These businesses make look slick and have the impression of performing well, but they are soulless places and they are missing that extra spark that disorganization, improvisation and confusion can bring to the creative process.

In this highly entertaining book, Tim Harford argues that clean pristine working areas, rather we need a little mess and disorder in our work and home lives to get that creativity back that is ultimately enriching. He uses lots of examples of how people have not had the exact equipment that they wanted or had the usual preparation time for a particular thing, and it turned out to be one of the best performance or speeches of their life.

Being organised does get things done, but that spark of creativity that happens when things are not quite so is where the magic lies. I really liked this book, partly because I am not so tidy, and tend to have lots of things on the go at any one time, but also because I think on a fundamental level he is right. I particularly liked the story of a lab in America that managed to create all manner of things and the reason was because of the layout of the building and people with a variety of different interests and skills would pass each other, get talking and spark new ideas off. If you are a person who likes all their pencils lined up, then this might not be the book for you, but perhaps you should read it, you never know what might happen… ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
This book's cover features blurbs by Brian Eno and Tyler Cowen. Otherwise, I never would have thought this was a book I'd enjoy. I fall on the 'tidy' end of the spectrum. I didn't want to read a book about how the most awesome, brilliant, and creative people in the world all have/had sloppy desks. Not only is it not my world - it tends to be a boring kind of book.

But - despite the requisite chapters about sloppy desks and messy workplaces, this book isn't about how you really should dis-organize your space so much as it's about the sometimes (!) beneficial effects of disorder in general. The first chapter on Brian Eno's "Oblique Strategies" sets the tone; to get people to be more creative and motivated in the studio, Eno created a deck of cards with suggestions of off-the-wall things to think about or do. He'd periodically pick a card, and suddenly everyone was instructed to try to "Think like a gardener," or all trade instruments.

There's a chapter about a crazy military commander or two, who'd keep the enemy - and sometimes their own men - just bewildered enough to allow the most improbable victories to be snatched from the jaws of defeat. There's a chapter about the famous "Building 20" at MIT, an ugly pile of cinderblocks with an unorganized disarray of offices, which nevertheless was a hotbed of scientific discovery and invention in the 20th century.

So it isn't about dividing people into messy vs. neat, so much as it's about how helpful it can often be when things DON'T follow the expected path. Harford encourages us to appreciate rather than rue the Oscar Madison that lives in all of us. Some (!) disorder is good for you; it shakes you up; you function better; it's real life. The book flowed well (dare I say it was well organized?); I always looked forward to returning to it each day. I'm a fan! ( )
  Tytania | Feb 14, 2019 |
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Messiness adds benefits to our lives, so why do we resist the concept so? Harford uses research from neuroscience, psychology and social science to explain why disorder, confusion, and disarray are actually lies at the core of how we innovate, how we achieve, how we reach each other. He shows that the human inclination for tidiness can mask a deep and debilitating fragility that keep us from innovation.

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