StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Little Big Man (1964)

von Thomas Berger, Thomas Berger

Weitere Autoren: Brooks Landon (Einführung)

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

Reihen: Little Big Man series (book 1)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,1222914,683 (4.15)111
Dustin Hoffman spielte die Hauptrolle in dem 1969 entstandenen Film "Little Big Man", und ein gewisser Ralph Fielding Snell, Literat der 60er Jahre, stellte Thomas Berger die 75 Tonbänder zur Verfügung, die er mit Jack Crabb aufgenommen hatte. Jack Crabb war der letzte überlebende Teilnehmer an Custers Indianermassaker am Little Big Horn. Er starb im Juni 1953, als er 111 Jahre alt war. R. F. Snell beschreibt ihn so: "Jack Crabb war ein zynischer, ungehobelter, skrupelloser, ja im Notfall sogar ruchloser Mann. Als Förderer seiner Teilbiographie kann ich sie keinesfalls Zartbesaiteten empfehlen. Er muß ein Produkt seiner Zeit, seiner Heimat und der Umstände gewesen sein. Aber eben solche Männer trieben unsere Grenze so weit vor, bis sie den glänzenden Ozean erreichte." Jack wurde als Junge von dem Cheyenne-Häuptling "Alte Zeltbahn" entführt und erlernte als dessen Adoptivsohn Lebensweise und Kultur der "Menschenwesen" - so nennt sich der Stamm. Seinem neuen Stiefbruder "Jüngerer Bär" rettet er das Leben und heißt daraufhin "Little Big Man". Fünf Jahre später kehrt er in die weiße Zivilisation zurück. Reverend Pendrake adoptiert den jungen Wilden und nimmt ihn mit nach Missouri. Doch Jack hält es in der Zivilisation nicht lange aus, und er bricht zu neuen Abenteuern auf. Schließlich wird er Zeuge und einziger weißer Überlebender der Schlacht am Little Bighorn.… (mehr)
Kürzlich hinzugefügt vonprivate Bibliothek, jgcorrea, 4Maya, mikernc, nick.yasuo, Gersas, ecamarca, MichelleandBobby, keremix
NachlassbibliothekenNelson Algren
  1. 60
    Weg in die Wildnis. Roman. von Larry McMurtry (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Western
  2. 40
    Einer flog über das Kuckucksnest von Ken Kesey (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
  3. 10
    Begrabt mein Herz an der Biegung des Flusses von Dee Brown (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: A different perspective on the tragedy of the American West.
  4. 10
    Cool Hand Luke: A Novel von Donn Pearce (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Amusing Rogue protagonists
  5. 00
    Unser Mann in Afrika von William Boyd (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Amusing Rogue protagonists
  6. 00
    Der weisse Tiger von Aravind Adiga (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Amusing Rogue protagonists
  7. 00
    Flashman von George MacDonald Fraser (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Amusing Rogue protagonists
  8. 01
    The Light in the Forest von Conrad Richter (mcenroeucsb)
  9. 23
    Der Fänger im Roggen von J. D. Salinger (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
  10. 13
    Ignaz oder Die Verschwörung der Idioten von John Kennedy Toole (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Books with Delusional/Enlightened Outcast protagonists
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

I only discovered Thomas Berger’s 1964 novel Little Big Man after watching its 1970 movie version starring Dustin Hoffman in the title role. But coincidentally, this second reading of the book coincided almost perfectly with the fiftieth anniversary of the first time I read it — and it turned out to be as entertaining as ever.

The novel’s main character, Jack Crabb, is the Forrest Gump of the second half of the nineteenth century. Despite dying at 34 years of age before he could complete his memoir, Crabb tells of his experiences and/or friendships with the likes of George Armstrong Custer, Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane, Wyatt Earp, and others. Much like the fictional Forrest Gump would do in his own part of the country decades later via novel and film, Jack was everywhere out West where anything of consequence seemed to be happening, including the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

The fictional editor responsible for getting Little Big Man’s memoir into print put it this way:

“It is of course unlikely that one man would have experienced even a third of Mr. Crabb’s claim. Half? Incredible! All? A mythomaniac! But you will find, as I did, that if any one part is accepted as truth, then what precedes and follows has a great lien on our credulity. If he knew Wild Bill Hickok, then why not General Custer as well?”

Jack Crabb’s big adventure begins when his father converts to Mormonism and decides to move the family cross country to Salt Lake City. Unfortunately for Mr. Crabb and his family, an Indian raid on the wagon train the family was a part of ended their move well before its intended destination. The good news is that not everyone in the family was killed in that raid; the bad news is that Jack and his older sister were carried away by the raiders. Jack’s sister, who had talked the Indians into taking Jack along in the first place, manages to escape early on, but she does so without including Jack in her escape plan. And that’s how Jack became the adopted son of an Indian chief and survived to have all the adventures captured in Little Big Man.

For the next quarter of a century, Jack will move between the white world and the Native American world each time he needs to save his life from one side or the other. Whenever he finds himself on the losing side of any battle between the Americans and the Indians, Jack manages to switch sides just in the nick of time in order to survive and begin a new set of adventures. He is so good at saving his own neck, in fact, that by the time his memoirs have attracted some interest, Jack Crabb is 111 years old and still feisty as ever.

Bottom Line: Little Big Man is great fun despite the tragic events the novel vividly portrays as Jack Crabb negotiates the two very different cultures he spends time in. It is the story of America’s westward expansion and the simultaneous near elimination of a race of people who already called this country home. It is a farcical view of American history that still manages the kind of emotional impact that serious, nonfiction history books do not always achieve. Little did they expect it, but fans of Little Big Man were to be rewarded 35 years later with the publication of Berger’s The Return of Little Big Man. How did Jack manage to tell the rest of his story? I’ll leave that up to you to find out because it’s all part of the fun. ( )
  SamSattler | Jan 6, 2022 |
Designed to mock and satirize the Western, Little Big Man is one of the best of the genre anyway. It keeps the reader off balance by way of a quick wit, gross exaggeration, and then out-of-nowhere: insight. Maybe not on the very top shelf of greatest novels of all-time, but not too far off either. ( )
  ProfH | Sep 30, 2021 |
historical fiction. Enjoyable western "memoir" that reads like a series of fantastically tall tales, though more violent than what I remember from the Dustin Hoffman movie (scalpings, corpse mutilations, and rapes are commonplace). ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Audible Audio performed by David Aaron Baker, Scott Sowers, and Henry Strozier.

Berger’s novel purports to be a memoir/autobiography of Jack Crabb, written with the help of ghost writer Ralph Snell. “Snell” opens the prologue thus: It was my privilege to know the late Jack Crabb – frontiersman, Indian scout, gunfighter, buffalo hunter, adopted Cheyenne – in his final days upon this earth. He goes on to relate how he learned of the reportedly 111-year-old man living in a nursing home, who claimed to be an eyewitness to Custer’s Last Stand at the Battle of Little Bighorn. The bulk of the novel is Crabb’s first-person account is life experiences from about 1852 to 1876. Snell then returns in an epilogue to explain that Crabb died shortly after relating that last chapter (Little Bighorn), and he regrets that he was unable to learn more of Crabb’s many exploits through the decades.

I was completely entertained by this novel of the American West. Berger gives the reader quite the raconteur in Crabb, with a gift for story-telling and colorful language. By the narrator’s own account, he certainly has a gift for landing on his feet, managing to get out of more than one potentially deadly scrape by his wits or sheer dumb luck. As he grows from boyhood Crabb is kidnapped / adopted by a Cheyenne tribe, taken in and sheltered by a minister and his wife, “works” as a gambler and gunfighter, hunts buffalo, marries a Scandinavian woman who speaks limited English, and eventually becomes a scout for George Armstrong Custer, thereby witnessing the US Army’s defeat at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Along the way he rejoins the Cheyenne tribe numerous times, listening to the advice of Old Lodge Skins, and relating much of the culture and traditions of that Native tribe, as well as what life was like for the European settlers during that time period.

If the scenarios stretch credulity, well that is part of the fun. We have always looked on the American West with a sort of awe and wonder, elevating many of the historical figures to the level of superhuman legends. Berger sprinkles Crabb’s recollections with a number of these people: Wild Bill Hickock, Wyatt Earp and Custer, among others.

In the epilogue Snell writes ”I leave the choice in your capable hands. Jack Crabb was either the most neglected hero in the history of this country or a liar of insane proportions.. It’s fun to imagine that some “everyman” did witness so much history first hand. His exploits could easily be the inspiration for “Forest Gump.”

The audiobook is performed by a talented trio: David Aaron Baker, Scott Sowers, and Henry Strozier. I do not know which narrated which sections, but they were all good. ( )
  BookConcierge | Dec 21, 2020 |
A hell of a good book.
Part True Grit, part Blood Meridian. ( )
  runningbeardbooks | Sep 29, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (6 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Thomas BergerHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Berger, ThomasHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Landon, BrooksEinführungCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Sowers, ScottErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
It was my privilege to know the late Jack Crabb—frontiersman, Indian scout, gunfighter, buffalo hunter, adopted Cheyenne—in his final days upon this earth.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

Dustin Hoffman spielte die Hauptrolle in dem 1969 entstandenen Film "Little Big Man", und ein gewisser Ralph Fielding Snell, Literat der 60er Jahre, stellte Thomas Berger die 75 Tonbänder zur Verfügung, die er mit Jack Crabb aufgenommen hatte. Jack Crabb war der letzte überlebende Teilnehmer an Custers Indianermassaker am Little Big Horn. Er starb im Juni 1953, als er 111 Jahre alt war. R. F. Snell beschreibt ihn so: "Jack Crabb war ein zynischer, ungehobelter, skrupelloser, ja im Notfall sogar ruchloser Mann. Als Förderer seiner Teilbiographie kann ich sie keinesfalls Zartbesaiteten empfehlen. Er muß ein Produkt seiner Zeit, seiner Heimat und der Umstände gewesen sein. Aber eben solche Männer trieben unsere Grenze so weit vor, bis sie den glänzenden Ozean erreichte." Jack wurde als Junge von dem Cheyenne-Häuptling "Alte Zeltbahn" entführt und erlernte als dessen Adoptivsohn Lebensweise und Kultur der "Menschenwesen" - so nennt sich der Stamm. Seinem neuen Stiefbruder "Jüngerer Bär" rettet er das Leben und heißt daraufhin "Little Big Man". Fünf Jahre später kehrt er in die weiße Zivilisation zurück. Reverend Pendrake adoptiert den jungen Wilden und nimmt ihn mit nach Missouri. Doch Jack hält es in der Zivilisation nicht lange aus, und er bricht zu neuen Abenteuern auf. Schließlich wird er Zeuge und einziger weißer Überlebender der Schlacht am Little Bighorn.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (4.15)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 8
2.5 1
3 29
3.5 10
4 97
4.5 19
5 92

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 173,950,990 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar