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Die Ersten ihrer Art (1953)

von Theodore Sturgeon

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
2,710624,134 (3.85)108
In this genre-bending novel, among the first to have launched sci fi into literature, a group of remarkable social outcasts band together for survival and discover that their combined powers render them superhuman. There's Lone, the simpleton who can hear other people's thoughts; Janie, who moves things without touching them; and the teleporting twins, who can travel ten feet or ten miles. There's Baby, who invented an antigravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world except for a conscience. Separately, they are talented freaks. Together, they may represent the next step in evolution-or the final chapter in the history of the human race. As they struggle to find whether they are meant to help humanity or destroy it, Sturgeon explores questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging.… (mehr)
  1. 10
    Es geschah am Tage X ... von John Wyndham (Michael.Rimmer)
  2. 00
    Triggers von Robert J. Sawyer (ShelfMonkey)
  3. 00
    Ein neues Babylon. von C. S. Friedman (MyriadBooks)
  4. 00
    Die Feuerschneise von James Jr. Tiptree (debbiereads)
  5. 00
    Sandman: Ewige Nächte von Neil Gaiman (MyriadBooks)
  6. 01
    Schall und Wahn von William Faulkner (alaskayo)
    alaskayo: Well, More Than Human is the sci-fi Sound+Fury, so get to it, fans!
  7. 01
    A Small and Remarkable Life von Nick DiChario (ShelfMonkey)
    ShelfMonkey: DiChario is the only writer I've found who echoes Theodore Sturgeon will still remaining vigorous and fresh.
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Theodore Sturgeon's More Than Human was a thought provoking book, but what blew me away was that the book was originally published in 1953. I don't know how the author managed to not date himself. He was brilliant. Was the message of the book the continuation of the species? Was the message timelessness? Read the book. ( )
  nab6215 | Jan 18, 2022 |
Next Step in Human Evolution

Humanity could have obliterated itself many times over throughout the ages; yet here we are. What, you may wonder, has saved us from ourselves? The answer is ourselves, we have saved ourselves because of certain traits we possess. We are social creatures, which means we need each other; that existing without others would be impossible. We are creatures of conscious, possessing, at least the vast majority of us, an innate and also learned morality. While we have many other traits and attribute as a species, these couple keep us from destroying ourselves. And, as Theodore Sturgeon dramatizes in More Than Human, even as we advance and evolve into more powerful creations, without these, well, kaput. In fact, these two traits form the essential parts of the next step, Homo Gestalt, and Homo Gestalt isn’t complete until that last one, morality and its concomitant conscious become part of the whole.

The full novel More Than Human grew out of a novella Sturgeon published in Galaxy in 1952, what became the middle of the novel, “Baby Is Three,” preceded in the novel by “The Fabulous Idiot,” and followed by “Morality.” The novel follows the merging of different individuals who each possess a special trait, telepathy, telekinesis, teleportation, advanced intellect, and finally (though not meshed into the group until the end) a conscious. Apart, each is vulnerable. Together they form a new step in human evolution, a species with abilities far beyond those of humans but grounded in humanity. To really use their abilities to move humanity forward, they need each other, and they need the one thing that will prevent them from destroying humankind and themselves: morality brought to the group by the last individual.

Part 1, “The Fabulous Idiot” follows Lone, a man who possesses telepathic powers, but no real connection to humanity until he finds Evelyn Kew. This ends in the tragedy of lost love. Lone then finds the poor farm family, the Prodds, who bring him in as the child they never could have. But when Mrs. Prodd becomes pregnant, Lone leaves to live in the woods. There he attracts three children, Janie with telekinetic powers, and the twins Bonnie and Beanie, who can’t talk but can teleport. Later, he learns Mrs. Prodd has died and left a mongoloid baby. Lone adopts the baby, who turns our to possess super intelligence. These then form the new Homo Gestalt.

Part 2, “Baby Is Three” occurs years later after the death of Lone. Gerry Thompson, an orphan and criminal, can’t remember his life and seeks the aid of a psychiatrist. With his aid, Gerry pieces together his life, realizing that he is the telepathic member of a family, the gestalt started by Lone. He has an uncontrolled ruthlessness about him that makes him dangerous.

Part 3, “Morality” begins years later with the desolate former Air Force Lt. Hip (Hippocrates) Barrows being found by a grown up Janie. Once a gifted engineer, he fell on hard times, being booted from the military and incarcerated in an asylum. Janie helps him discover his past life, the cause of his current condition, and his real purpose in life, which is to join the gestalt and provide them, particularly Gerry, the a governor of morality.

Winner of the 1954 International Fantasy Award (no longer awarded), Sturgeon offers insights the nature of human and humanity, and a unique imagining of how humankind might evolve in the future.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Next Step in Human Evolution

Humanity could have obliterated itself many times over throughout the ages; yet here we are. What, you may wonder, has saved us from ourselves? The answer is ourselves, we have saved ourselves because of certain traits we possess. We are social creatures, which means we need each other; that existing without others would be impossible. We are creatures of conscious, possessing, at least the vast majority of us, an innate and also learned morality. While we have many other traits and attribute as a species, these couple keep us from destroying ourselves. And, as Theodore Sturgeon dramatizes in More Than Human, even as we advance and evolve into more powerful creations, without these, well, kaput. In fact, these two traits form the essential parts of the next step, Homo Gestalt, and Homo Gestalt isn’t complete until that last one, morality and its concomitant conscious become part of the whole.

The full novel More Than Human grew out of a novella Sturgeon published in Galaxy in 1952, what became the middle of the novel, “Baby Is Three,” preceded in the novel by “The Fabulous Idiot,” and followed by “Morality.” The novel follows the merging of different individuals who each possess a special trait, telepathy, telekinesis, teleportation, advanced intellect, and finally (though not meshed into the group until the end) a conscious. Apart, each is vulnerable. Together they form a new step in human evolution, a species with abilities far beyond those of humans but grounded in humanity. To really use their abilities to move humanity forward, they need each other, and they need the one thing that will prevent them from destroying humankind and themselves: morality brought to the group by the last individual.

Part 1, “The Fabulous Idiot” follows Lone, a man who possesses telepathic powers, but no real connection to humanity until he finds Evelyn Kew. This ends in the tragedy of lost love. Lone then finds the poor farm family, the Prodds, who bring him in as the child they never could have. But when Mrs. Prodd becomes pregnant, Lone leaves to live in the woods. There he attracts three children, Janie with telekinetic powers, and the twins Bonnie and Beanie, who can’t talk but can teleport. Later, he learns Mrs. Prodd has died and left a mongoloid baby. Lone adopts the baby, who turns our to possess super intelligence. These then form the new Homo Gestalt.

Part 2, “Baby Is Three” occurs years later after the death of Lone. Gerry Thompson, an orphan and criminal, can’t remember his life and seeks the aid of a psychiatrist. With his aid, Gerry pieces together his life, realizing that he is the telepathic member of a family, the gestalt started by Lone. He has an uncontrolled ruthlessness about him that makes him dangerous.

Part 3, “Morality” begins years later with the desolate former Air Force Lt. Hip (Hippocrates) Barrows being found by a grown up Janie. Once a gifted engineer, he fell on hard times, being booted from the military and incarcerated in an asylum. Janie helps him discover his past life, the cause of his current condition, and his real purpose in life, which is to join the gestalt and provide them, particularly Gerry, the a governor of morality.

Winner of the 1954 International Fantasy Award (no longer awarded), Sturgeon offers insights the nature of human and humanity, and a unique imagining of how humankind might evolve in the future.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
One of the worst science fiction works I've read. I recently purchased it through 'Better World Books' for $3.98 and I'll be selling it to 'Half Price Books,' for maybe $.25. Perhaps it's the fact 'More Than Human' was written in 1953 and I read it 64 years later. The book was penned when those on the political left were certain, any day now, Man would blow the planet Earth up. These were also the days when telekinesis and telepathy and hypnosis were the going thing. Reading the book, you cannot tell who is speaking, after character after character is added. ** S P O I L E R A L E R T ** And, after flogging myself to keep reading, I finally discover that, basically the book has very little science fiction in it, but a lot about morality and mores and ethos. Ends up the 'Gestalt Five' characters in the book are a new, advanced, evolved, Man. (BTW: I know this review is written sloppy, but, since I'm not getting paid, live with it.) ( )
  AZBob1951 | Oct 27, 2021 |
A book that makes you imagine, in the tradition of the best works of science fiction. It tackles the question of how humans will evolve next, and answers it in a plausible, if unexpected, way. Well worth the read. And a good story to boot! ( )
  TomMcGreevy | Sep 8, 2021 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (19 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Sturgeon, TheodoreHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Bacon, C.W.UmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ellison, HarlanErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Goodfellow, PeterUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Moore, ChrisUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Pepper, BobUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Powers, Richard M.UmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Rudnicki, StefanErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Valla, RiccardoÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Viskupic, GaryUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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To His Gestaltitude
Nicholas Samstag
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The idiot lived in a black and gray world, punctuated by the white lightning of hunger and the flickering of fear.
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In this genre-bending novel, among the first to have launched sci fi into literature, a group of remarkable social outcasts band together for survival and discover that their combined powers render them superhuman. There's Lone, the simpleton who can hear other people's thoughts; Janie, who moves things without touching them; and the teleporting twins, who can travel ten feet or ten miles. There's Baby, who invented an antigravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world except for a conscience. Separately, they are talented freaks. Together, they may represent the next step in evolution-or the final chapter in the history of the human race. As they struggle to find whether they are meant to help humanity or destroy it, Sturgeon explores questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging.

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