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Auf der Suche nach Indien. (1924)

von E. M. Forster

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
11,258125486 (3.76)568
1924 erstmals erschienener Roman, in dem sich Forster (1879-1970) mit der Arroganz der britischen Kolonialherren in Indien und den unüberbrückbaren Gegensätzen zwischen den beiden Kulturen auseinandersetzt..
  1. 50
    Engel und Narren von E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Same author, different setting, same core themes
  2. 50
    The Raj Quartet, Volume 1: The Jewel in the Crown; The Day of the Scorpion von Paul Scott (FemmeNoiresque)
    FemmeNoiresque: Scott's The Raj Quartet, and particularly the relationship between Daphne Manners and Hari Kumar in the first novel, The Jewel In The Crown, is a revisioning of the charge of rape made by Adela Quested to Dr Aziz. Race, class and empire are explored in the aftermath of this event, in WWII India.… (mehr)
  3. 40
    Maurice von E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: The man is brilliant! One should read all of his books!
  4. 40
    Willkommen in Kilanga von Barbara Kingsolver (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: You could use the theme of colonialism to pair The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver with Passage to India by E. M. Forster.
  5. 10
    Shantaram von Gregory David Roberts (Booksloth)
  6. 10
    Major Pettigrew's Last Stand von Helen Simonson (kiwiflowa)
  7. 21
    Das Juwel in der Krone von Paul Scott (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: These two novels bear close relationship in setting and circumstance.
  8. 10
    Natural Opium: Some Travelers' Tales von Diane Johnson (Anonymer Nutzer)
  9. 00
    Der Gott der kleinen Dinge von Arundhati Roy (WildMaggie)
  10. 00
    Slowly Down the Ganges von Eric Newby (John_Vaughan)
  11. 00
    Staying On von Paul Scott (KayCliff)
  12. 00
    Hindu holiday : ein indisches Tagebuch von J. R. Ackerley (SomeGuyInVirginia)
  13. 34
    The Jewel in the Crown [1984 TV mini-series] von Christopher Morahan (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Similar period and themes
Asia (12)
My TBR (22)
1920s (2)
Lädt ...

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8496075036
  archivomorero | Jun 27, 2022 |
Absolutely brilliant account of British colonialism in India. I read this in high school and wandered around in sepia toned, saffron scented day dreams for weeks afterwards. A must read for any serious historical reader. ( )
  Windyone1 | May 10, 2022 |
I enjoyed this novel. The author writes extremely well. This story is about how British settlers and Indians get along in the 1920s, when India was still a colony of Great Britain. In a nutshell: With the worst intentions, they are enemies; even with the best intentions, they can't be friends. (Okay there's also a plot progression that brings about this conclusion: Two English women newly arrived in India befriends an Indian; they visit a cave together, one of the English women had a hallucination and claimed the Indian violated her; the Indian was put on trial, with different British people taking different sides; it turns out the Indian was innocent, but through the trials and the repercussions of the trials, the Indian find he can never be friends with English people again, at least not until Indian is free. ) The author writes in detail about the different landscapes in India, and presented the religious beliefs in India (particularly Hinduism) in a mystic yet somehow convincing light. The British are portrayed as blatantly racist, but rational, calm, and law-abiding, whereas the Indians are irrational and passionate. Thus, while Anglo India does bring modernity and rationality into the governing of India, they do so through oppression. And while India yearns for self-government, their division and irrationality seems to prevent them from effectiveness. ( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
I'm not sure why I never read this book before. I've enjoyed other books by Forster and I have always liked books set in India. For whatever reason I had not read this and it was with delight that I received it from my SecretSanta on LibraryThing. It is on the 1001 Books to Read Before You Die list and with this book done I have read 300 books from the list.

Forster sets this book in the fictional city of Chandrapore in northern India with a small colonial outpost. The time is the early 20th century when the British raj was very much in control of the country. The British people socialize with other British people with very few exceptions. So when Adela Quested, visiting India with the purpose of seeing if Ronnie Heaslop is suitable marriage material, expresses a wish to see the "real India" she is greeted with some disdain. Miss Quested was escorted to India by Heaslop's mother, Mrs. Moore, who would also like to meet some Indians. In fact, while she was taking a breath of air from a theatrical performance at the club she met Dr. Aziz, a medical doctor who is widowed and has three children. Mrs. Moore is also a widow and also has three children, Ronnie from her first marriage and another boy and girl from her second. Mrs. Moore is desirous of seeing all her children settled, starting with Ronnie. When Dr. Aziz proposes a visit to the nearby Marabar caves to show Mrs. Moore and Miss Quested the "real India" it proves to be a defining moment in all their lives. Dr. Aziz is charged with sexually assaulting Miss Quested. Did he do so? Or did their local guide assault her? Or did Miss Quested, upset by the strange echoes in the caves, imagine the whole affair? The only non-Indian who believes Dr. Aziz when he says he is innocent is Mr. Fielding, the Principal of the Government College. His support of Aziz drives a wedge between him and the other colonials. Years later when Aziz and Fielding meet again, Aziz (who thinks that Fielding married Miss Quested when he went back to England) spurns his offer of a renewal of their friendship. When he discovers that Fielding married Mrs. Moore's daughter, not Miss Quested, he realizes that he has allowed the whole Chandrapore experience to darken his life. He is even willing to write to Miss Quested to tell her he forgives her.

I would be really interested to know if modern day Indians have read this book and what they think of it. Forster is very supportive of the Indians and critical of the British rule of India. On the other hand, he is of the colonizing race and there is now a feeling that the people who were the object of colonization should tell their own stories. ( )
  gypsysmom | Feb 19, 2022 |
"A Passage to India" is a novel though largely based on Forster’s personal experience of travels through India and his deep, enduring, unrequited love of a man of Indian descent. Written in 1924, it is the story of a young woman’s journey to meet her potential fiancé- a British government worker stationed in India. It is a simple tale set within a very culturally complex society.

Between 1858 and 1947 India was under British rule and the Indian Nationalist movement was just getting started. There was a lot of tension between the British conquerers and the Indian civilians. Those on either side did not intermingle socially and barely tolerated each other in business and government matters. The country was rife with prejudice and racial tension. In addition to the British vs. Indian political dissension, there was religious conflict as well. The British Christians scorned most Indians and the Muslims looked down upon the Hindus. Forster does a wonderful job of using fictional characters to demonstrate the diversity. For this achievement alone, the book is a classic and listed as Number 25 on Modern Library’s list of the best 100 novels of all time.

The primary characters of A "Passage to India" include the young British woman Adele, her fiancé and his British mother, a Muslim Dr. Aziz, a Hindu Professor Mr. Godbole, and a British atheist Professor Cyril Fielding.

The plot: while all relevant characters are trying to maintain a fine balance socially with superficial but polite and courteous interaction, one disastrous incident sets off a chain of events that sparks civil unrest and near riots.

This “incident” which takes place in a dark haunting cave is the focal point of the entire novel, yet the details are vague and therefore weaken the plot. One is never to discover if Adele is really assaulted or not. And that’s okay, but what is difficult to understand are the numerous academic interpretations of the plot which offer “opinionated” but unsubstantiated details. No-where in the book- even after 2 readings- did I discern Adele’s slightest attraction to Dr. Aziz. Perhaps if she had been attracted to him and rejected, it would help explain her actions. And Adele is not a very likable character. Forster clearly paints her as ugly, unwomanly, unsophisticated, rude, and uncouth. Therefore many of the events are predictable, but absurd.

Nevertheless, the suspense is palpable leading up to the incident. The pages reek with forthcoming disaster. And descriptions of India’s culture and geography are bold and dynamic. Forster touches on mysticism, rituals and festivities, primitive customs, ancient monuments, and the stark inhabitable landscape.

It’s a worthy read, but in my opinion, overrated, outdated, and somewhat elementary.

Rated 3 Stars ( )
  LadyLo | Aug 18, 2021 |

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (42 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Forster, E. M.AutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Burra, PeterEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Campbell, AliUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Dastor, SamErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Davidson, FrederickErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Diaz, DavidUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Magadini, ChristopherIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Mishra, PankajEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Motti, AdrianaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Pigott-Smith, TimReaderCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sanders, Scott RussellNachwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Simpson, WilliamUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stallybrass, OliverHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Wilby, JamesErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

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Except for the Marabar caves--and they are twenty miles off--the city of Chrandrapore presents nothing extraordinary.
Towards the end of 1906 Theodore Morison, who until recently had been Principal of the Anglo-Oriental College at Aligarh and now lived ay Weybridge, Surrey, was looking for a tutor in Latin for his Indian ward Syed Ross Masood, a young Moslem of good, indeed distinguished, family who was destined for Oxford. (Editor's Introduction)
The India described in A Passage to India no longer exists either politically or socially. (Prefatory Note)
Perhaps it is chance, more than any peculiar devotion, that determines a man in his choice of medium, when he finds himself possessed by an obscure impulse towards creation. (Introduction)
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1924 erstmals erschienener Roman, in dem sich Forster (1879-1970) mit der Arroganz der britischen Kolonialherren in Indien und den unüberbrückbaren Gegensätzen zwischen den beiden Kulturen auseinandersetzt..

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Durchschnitt: (3.76)
0.5 3
1 39
1.5 5
2 132
2.5 23
3 410
3.5 124
4 728
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