StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Dinner At Deviant's Palace
Lädt ...

Dinner At Deviant's Palace (Original 1985; 1985. Auflage)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
8231820,622 (3.54)18
A Philip K. Dick Award Winner from "a brilliant writer": In a ravaged California, a man tries to rescue his lost love from a soul-devouring religious cult (William Gibson).   In the twenty-second century, the City of Angels is a tragic shell of its former self, having long ago been ruined and reshaped by nuclear disaster. Before he was in a band in Ellay, Gregorio Rivas was a redeemer, rescuing lost souls trapped in the Jaybirds cult of the powerful maniac Norton Jaybush. Rivas had hoped those days were behind him, but a desperate entreaty from a powerful official is pulling him back into the game. The rewards will be plentiful if he can wrest Urania, the official's daughter and Gregorio's first love, from Jaybush's sinister clutches. To do so, the redeemer reborn must face blood-sucking hemogoblins and other monstrosities on his way to discovering the ultimate secrets of this neo-Californian civilization.   One of the most ingeniously imaginative writers of our time, Tim Powers dazzles in an early work that displays his unique creative genius, earning him a nomination for the Nebula Award. Alive with wit, intelligence, and wild invention, Dinner at Deviant's Palace is a mad adventure across a dystopian future as only Tim Powers could have imagined it. This ebook features an original introduction by the author.  … (mehr)
Mitglied:everdonbooks
Titel:Dinner At Deviant's Palace
Autoren:
Info:Ace Books (1985), Mass Market Paperback
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:novel, science fiction

Werk-Informationen

Zu Tisch in Deviants Palast. Roman. von Tim Powers (1985)

Keine
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Dinner at Deviant’s Palace is a bit unusual for a Tim Powers’ book, a post-apocalyptic adventure rather than a secret history. In my own mind, it has been overshadowed a bit by The Anubis Gates, possibly Powers’ most famous novel, released two years earlier. Yet, Gregorio Rivas’ quest to rescue his long-lost love from the cult of the Jaybirds is solid, with very classic Powers themes like the attraction of sin and the hazards of adventuring. I think this one may be a bit underappreciated, so let’s take a closer look.

Like Jerry Pournelle, Powers has set a number of his books in and around Los Angeles. I happen to be pretty familiar with LA, but I like this kind of thing even when it is not an area I’m familiar with. But since this is a post-apocalyptic LA, Powers gets to have some fun with the location. My personal favorite is the Ellay-Ex Deep, the circular bay that is reputed to glow in the center, and from whence radioactive delights are fished up to be served in the titular palace.

Ellay itself is what passes for a bastion of civilization, a center of trade in a mostly agricultural landscape. Gregorio has a pretty comfortable life there, playing his violin-like pelican in a bar, drinking, whoring, and enjoying the dissipations of being a post-apocalyptic rock star. At least until a baldy sport shows up at Spinks and offers him a ridiculous amount of money to go on one last redemption.

I hadn’t been aware of the use of the term “sport” in a genetic sense until I read Dinner at Deviant’s Palace. I mostly thought of the word “sport” as a upper-crusty way of referring to a friend, like in The Great Gatsby. Greg uses the term as an insult when he rejects the bald man’s offer, nearly getting himself into a duel over it. I enjoy the word play that Powers engages in here, as I suspect most native English readers would not think he was calling the man a mutant to his face. There is a lot of that in this book, and I enjoyed it immensely.

Unlike The Drawing of the Dark, I didn’t often find Dinner at Deviant’s Palace laugh out loud funny. The themes of the book are typical for Powers, but the voice is very different. It is often dry and witty, but also dark, with touches of horror. I appreciate this difference, as Greg is a very different man than Brian Duffy. Brian is a charming old reprobate; Greg is just kind of an asshole. It is possible that this book is a less popular one just because of Greg’s personality, which is distinctly unlovely.

Greg does share some traits with Brian: he’s left-handed, deft with a blade, and more than a bit of a drunkard. That latter item is in itself a common theme of Powers works. Powers himself has said that he had to give up drinking in the mid 1990s, which would have been about ten years later than he wrote this book. Not only Brian Duffy and Greg Rivas, but Scott Crane and other Powers protagonists have tended to drink to excess. For all of these characters, it fits well. Rock stars, old soldiers, and men dealing with grief often turn to drink. However, another profession that tends to be tipplers are authors, and I’ve often felt that Powers was writing from personal experience here.

Yet, despite Greg’s flaws, he is not just a protagonist, but a hero. A genuine white hat. For all his selfishness and vanity, Greg does eventually agree to try and redeem the daughter of the richest man in Ellay [although not without attempting to drive a very hard bargain first]. Because Greg cannot abandon Urania to the tender mercies of the Jaybirds. He knows what they are like, because he was one.

Greg was the best redeemer in Ellay because he knew Norton Jaybush and his followers, the Jaybirds, well enough to infiltrate the group and spirit away new recruits before their minds were ruined. In a providential twist, Greg’s personality equips him well for this role [and his drinking and talent for music come in handy too]. However, Greg is retired from redeeming for a reason: adventuring is a young man’s game.

Greg Rivas isn’t old by any stretch, but I do appreciate Powers’ lively sense of what it means to age. Greg’s knowledge is just as relevant as ever, but when success or failure depends upon the quickness of your knife and how long you can go without sleep, even getting into your thirties is going to lower your odds.

That Greg agrees to do this at all, given that he knows he has a good chance of failure, is why I see Greg as a hero rather than an anti-hero. Little does he realize the price he will pay. In addition to Powers take on getting old, it is rare for a Powers protagonist to make to the end of a book with all of their bits intact. And yet, for all the physical peril that Greg faces, dying is far from the worst thing that could happen to him.

Greg’s quest is both enabled and undermined by his incipient dissolution, and his fate hinges on: who is Gregorio Rivas? Come along on an adventure and find out. ( )
  bespen | Oct 1, 2020 |
This is really a book I'm not sure I like. I read it a long time ago, and it left an unfavorable impression, but I couldn't recall any of the details.

On a reread - I found it considerable different than what I thought it originally was. The book is well done. We have a post-apocalyptic California west coast. What happened is never mentioned, nor does it matter. Our protagonist, Greg Rivas is retired from a life of retrieving loved ones from an especially devious cult. When Greg's first love joins the cult, he does one last run to save her.

On the whole - this book is weird. Like twisted weird. Its not a bad thing, but it is relentless. From the Jaybird cult, to who Deviant is. Its a completely weird book, and there isn't much that is positive in it. Luckily, its short, covers some very interesting ground, and its logically consistent.

As stated originally, its a book I'm not sure I like, but the book is intriguing. ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Jun 14, 2020 |
Pretty good tale, this, not one of Powers's best, but a fun read regardless. I was interested to see how Powers would handle what was ostensibly a science fiction story, since he mostly sets his stuff in existing cultures and time periods, albeit warped versions of such. I'm glad to say he pulls it off pretty well. It's clear Powers put a lot of thought into his setting, a post apocalyptic LA and its surrounding environs. Things feel run down but still serviceable. Beer and liquor are the new currency. People with gold teeth are used as mediums due to "voices" they are said to hear. A new cult called the Jaybirds has sprung up in the ruins, seizing people off the streets and turning them into mindless zealots. In response a thriving trade in "redeeming" has appeared, basically freeing the captive before they are wholly taken under the influence of the cultists.

The main protagonist, Gregorio Rivas, is a former redeemer turned musician, whiling his hours away playing to packed out crowds while slowly drinking himself into a stupor. Pretty typical Powers's anti-hero really, though a good bit younger and fresher than Brian Duffy and the like. Needless to say, his former life catches up to him in the form of an old enemy whose daughter, an old flame of Rivas's, has been captured. Much of the rest of the book follows his several abortive attempts to get the man's daughter back (and perhaps pick up from where things left off) during which time he learns the truth about the Jaybirds and its sinister leader, Norton Jaybush.

The story cracks along at a fair old pace, and while it lacks a little of the staggering inventiveness of his better known works, it never quite loses the plot either (something that Powers has been guilty of in the past). Good, fun work. Worth seeking out. ( )
  StuartNorth | Nov 19, 2016 |
Pretty good tale, this, not one of Powers's best, but a fun read regardless. I was interested to see how Powers would handle what was ostensibly a science fiction story, since he mostly sets his stuff in existing cultures and time periods, albeit warped versions of such. I'm glad to say he pulls it off pretty well. It's clear Powers put a lot of thought into his setting, a post apocalyptic LA and its surrounding environs. Things feel run down but still serviceable. Beer and liquor are the new currency. People with gold teeth are used as mediums due to "voices" they are said to hear. A new cult called the Jaybirds has sprung up in the ruins, seizing people off the streets and turning them into mindless zealots. In response a thriving trade in "redeeming" has appeared, basically freeing the captive before they are wholly taken under the influence of the cultists.

The main protagonist, Gregorio Rivas, is a former redeemer turned musician, whiling his hours away playing to packed out crowds while slowly drinking himself into a stupor. Pretty typical Powers's anti-hero really, though a good bit younger and fresher than Brian Duffy and the like. Needless to say, his former life catches up to him in the form of an old enemy whose daughter, an old flame of Rivas's, has been captured. Much of the rest of the book follows his several abortive attempts to get the man's daughter back (and perhaps pick up from where things left off) during which time he learns the truth about the Jaybirds and its sinister leader, Norton Jaybush.

The story cracks along at a fair old pace, and while it lacks a little of the staggering inventiveness of his better known works, it never quite loses the plot either (something that Powers has been guilty of in the past). Good, fun work. Worth seeking out. ( )
  StuartNorth | Nov 19, 2016 |
My favorite of Powers' books, this one taking place in a near-future Los Angeles that is vaguely familiar and yet wonderfully spooky. Set the stage for other authors (like William Gibson and other cyber novelists for example) and offers us a fun look at post-atomic vampire-like creatures. Second time through, I am struck by the fact that Powers borrows many of the same tropes as Tolkien. We have a quest, a corrupting object of power, a character resembling Gollum and a land with danger around every corner. And a hero who seems rather ordinary who ends up acting quite selflessly. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (2 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Tim PowersHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Berkey, JohnUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
D'Achille, GinoUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Potter, J. K.UmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Walotsky, RonUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To the Thursday Night Gang:

Chris Arena, Greg Arena, Bill Bailey, Jim Blaylock, Jenny Bunn, Pete Devries, Phil Dick, Jeff Fontanesi, Don Goudie, Chris Gourlay, Dashiell Hamster, Rick Harding, K. W. Jeter, Tom Kenyon, Dave Lamont, Tim Lamont, Steve Malk, Phil Pace, Brendan Powers, Serena Powers, and Phil Thibodeau...

...and the honorary members: Russ Galen, Dean Koontz, Roy Squires, Joel Stein, Ted Wassard, and Paul Williams...

...and with thanks to Beth Meacham, most perceptive, persuasive and tactful of editors.
Erste Worte
Modesto kauerte hoch oben auf der Wand im rostigen Chassis des Schaukelnden Lastwagens, zog die Jacke vor der Brust enger zusammen, schob den Hut aus der Stirn und überblickte blinzelnd die Stadt.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

A Philip K. Dick Award Winner from "a brilliant writer": In a ravaged California, a man tries to rescue his lost love from a soul-devouring religious cult (William Gibson).   In the twenty-second century, the City of Angels is a tragic shell of its former self, having long ago been ruined and reshaped by nuclear disaster. Before he was in a band in Ellay, Gregorio Rivas was a redeemer, rescuing lost souls trapped in the Jaybirds cult of the powerful maniac Norton Jaybush. Rivas had hoped those days were behind him, but a desperate entreaty from a powerful official is pulling him back into the game. The rewards will be plentiful if he can wrest Urania, the official's daughter and Gregorio's first love, from Jaybush's sinister clutches. To do so, the redeemer reborn must face blood-sucking hemogoblins and other monstrosities on his way to discovering the ultimate secrets of this neo-Californian civilization.   One of the most ingeniously imaginative writers of our time, Tim Powers dazzles in an early work that displays his unique creative genius, earning him a nomination for the Nebula Award. Alive with wit, intelligence, and wild invention, Dinner at Deviant's Palace is a mad adventure across a dystopian future as only Tim Powers could have imagined it. This ebook features an original introduction by the author.  

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.54)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 8
2.5 4
3 45
3.5 17
4 48
4.5 5
5 15

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,591,043 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar