StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Deep Waters: Mysteries on the Waves (British…
Lädt ...

Deep Waters: Mysteries on the Waves (British Library Crime Classics) (2019. Auflage)

von Martin Edwards (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
6010352,256 (3.7)7
Mystery crime fiction written in the Golden Age of Murder From picturesque canals to the swirling currents of the ocean, a world of secrets lies buried beneath the surface of the water. Dubious vessels crawl along riverbeds, while the murky depths conceal more than one gruesome murder. The stories in this collection will dredge up delight in crime fiction fans, as watery graves claim unintended dwellers and disembodied whispers penetrate the sleeping quarters of a ship's captain. How might a thief plot their escape from a floating crime scene? And what is to follow when murder victims, lost to the ocean floor, inevitably resurface? This British Library anthology uncovers the best mysteries set below the surface, including stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, William Hope Hodgson, and R. Austin Freeman.… (mehr)
Keine
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

A collection of sixteen stories all with a connection to water, published from the 1890s onwards. Displaying a vast range of different writing styles I did enjoy most of the stories, but the two I probably liked the most were Bullion and Seasprite.
A NetGalley Book ( )
  Vesper1931 | Jul 29, 2021 |
The British Library Crime Classics series (published and marketed in the US by Poisoned Pen Press) is growing into a veritable library spanning the “Golden Age” of crime fiction. Since 2012, the series has presented to the public forgotten gems of the genre.

Martin Edwards, who is himself an award-winning crime writer and Chairperson of the Crime Writers’ Association, deserves much of the credit for the success of this venture. Besides acting as series consultant, he has also edited several of its “themed anthologies”. I must admit that although I enjoy some crime fiction now and then, it is not the genre I typically read. I guess that for persons like me, these multi-author anthologies are an ideal entry point to the Crime Classics series. Edwards is an erudite and intelligent editor, who knows how to keep a reader interested through the variety of the chosen stories.

“Deep Waters”, the thirteenth anthology to appear in the series, is an excellent example. It features a total of sixteen stories which all bear some relation to water. Edwards casts his net wide, and the watery settings to the chosen tales range from cruise liners sailing the oceans, to river boats, canals and even ponds and swimming pools. The stories are spread over a century or so, starting in 1893 with the very first piece in the Sherlock Holmes canon (Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Gloria Scott”) and ending with “Death by Water” by Michael Innes (the pen-name of Edinburgh-born academic John Innes Mackintosh Stewart), first published in the 1975 collection “The Appleby File”.

Along the way, we meet examples of works by leading representatives of the “Golden Age” crime fiction, such as E.W. Hornung and Edmund Crispin, alongside lesser-known authors such as Kem Bennett. Crime fiction is often dismissed as being too formulaic – this selection shows that nothing can be further from the truth and that the best authors find ingenious ways of presenting, reinterpreting and in some cases subverting the expectations of the genre. The protagonists range from professional to amateur or even ‘accidental’ investigators and there’s an appearance by E.W. Hornung’s amiable rogue ‘Raffles’. There are also some excellent examples of crime sub-genres such as the ‘locked-room mystery’ (as in “Bullion”, by William Hope Hodgson, possibly better-known as the author of creepy ghost stories) and the “inverted mystery”, where the solution to the mystery is presented to the reader at the outset and the pleasure lies in discovering how the puzzle will be unravelled.

Although the style of some of featured pieces feels rather dated, there is much enjoyment to be had from these watery tales. As a bonus, Martin Edwards provides a foreword to the anthology, as well as an introduction to each story, with biographical and bibliographical details.
( )
  JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
The British Library Crime Classics series (published and marketed in the US by Poisoned Pen Press) is growing into a veritable library spanning the “Golden Age” of crime fiction. Since 2012, the series has presented to the public forgotten gems of the genre.

Martin Edwards, who is himself an award-winning crime writer and Chairperson of the Crime Writers’ Association, deserves much of the credit for the success of this venture. Besides acting as series consultant, he has also edited several of its “themed anthologies”. I must admit that although I enjoy some crime fiction now and then, it is not the genre I typically read. I guess that for persons like me, these multi-author anthologies are an ideal entry point to the Crime Classics series. Edwards is an erudite and intelligent editor, who knows how to keep a reader interested through the variety of the chosen stories.

“Deep Waters”, the thirteenth anthology to appear in the series, is an excellent example. It features a total of sixteen stories which all bear some relation to water. Edwards casts his net wide, and the watery settings to the chosen tales range from cruise liners sailing the oceans, to river boats, canals and even ponds and swimming pools. The stories are spread over a century or so, starting in 1893 with the very first piece in the Sherlock Holmes canon (Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Gloria Scott”) and ending with “Death by Water” by Michael Innes (the pen-name of Edinburgh-born academic John Innes Mackintosh Stewart), first published in the 1975 collection “The Appleby File”.

Along the way, we meet examples of works by leading representatives of the “Golden Age” crime fiction, such as E.W. Hornung and Edmund Crispin, alongside lesser-known authors such as Kem Bennett. Crime fiction is often dismissed as being too formulaic – this selection shows that nothing can be further from the truth and that the best authors find ingenious ways of presenting, reinterpreting and in some cases subverting the expectations of the genre. The protagonists range from professional to amateur or even ‘accidental’ investigators and there’s an appearance by E.W. Hornung’s amiable rogue ‘Raffles’. There are also some excellent examples of crime sub-genres such as the ‘locked-room mystery’ (as in “Bullion”, by William Hope Hodgson, possibly better-known as the author of creepy ghost stories) and the “inverted mystery”, where the solution to the mystery is presented to the reader at the outset and the pleasure lies in discovering how the puzzle will be unravelled.

Although the style of some of featured pieces feels rather dated, there is much enjoyment to be had from these watery tales. As a bonus, Martin Edwards provides a foreword to the anthology, as well as an introduction to each story, with biographical and bibliographical details.
( )
  JosephCamilleri | Sep 12, 2020 |
This collection of 16 short stories (a couple bordering on novellas or novelettes) take as their theme the water. Lots of messing about on boats leading to murder. This is a good mix of well-known-to-Golden-Age-enthusiast stories and a few more obscure ones. Starting off the collection with a Holmes story is always a good idea ("The Adventure of the Gloria Scott"), and Edmund Crispin and Michael Innes are decent choices too. There are a couple of stories by women authors, but certainly less than half.

My favourite stories in the collection were Christopher St. John Spriggs's contribution ("Four Friends and Death") and C.S. Forester's story ("The Turn of the Tide"). I prefer Forester's crime to his Hornblower stories and agree with Martin Edwards that it's a shame Forester didn't write more in the way of crime. I also enjoyed "Bullion!", which was a bit piratey-feeling, and I enjoyed laughing at the automaton in "The Pool of Secrets", which I felt was totally bananas in a Tom Swift sort of way.

A couple of stories went overly long ("The Swimming Pool") or were just okay, rather than great. I also found that something like "The Thimble River Mystery" relied primarily on sailing things that I am not sure a non-sailor would have figured out. Or they might get most of the way there but not completely. If you're the sort that likes to be able to solve the crime, that might irk you.

Overall I think this is a good collection, although I would suggest reading it in print if you can; the ebook version I read through my library had almost no distinction between the introductory text before the story and the actual story (unless the story itself contained things like "Part 1"). Made it a bit confusing to figure out where the introduction ended and the story began. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Aug 23, 2020 |
Sixteen short stories all relating to water,be it rivers,seasides,estuaries, pools and so on. And ranging in style from classic murder mysteries to tales of the unexpected. Some are good,very good indeed,and some do not quite enchant me so much.
But one of the great advantages and delights of these anthologies is the fact that you are introduced to different writers(some famous like Arthur Conan Doyle,C.S.Forester,Michael Innes and some now long forgotten) and their different approach to the "murder mystery". And notwithstanding the fact that some were written more than a century ago,they are still highly readable and are still a wonderfull source of bookish pleasure. ( )
  Obi2015 | Jul 19, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (1 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Edwards, MartinHerausgeberHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Bailey, H. C.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Bell, JosephineMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Bennett, KemMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Bentley, PhyllisMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Crispin, EdmundMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Doyle, Arthur ConanMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Eustace, RobertMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Evans, GwynMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Forester, C. S.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Freeman, R. AustinMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Garve, AndrewMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Hodgson, William HopeMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Hornung, E. W.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Innes, MichaelMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Meade, LTMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Pattinson, JamesMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Sprigg, Christopher St JohnMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

Mystery crime fiction written in the Golden Age of Murder From picturesque canals to the swirling currents of the ocean, a world of secrets lies buried beneath the surface of the water. Dubious vessels crawl along riverbeds, while the murky depths conceal more than one gruesome murder. The stories in this collection will dredge up delight in crime fiction fans, as watery graves claim unintended dwellers and disembodied whispers penetrate the sleeping quarters of a ship's captain. How might a thief plot their escape from a floating crime scene? And what is to follow when murder victims, lost to the ocean floor, inevitably resurface? This British Library anthology uncovers the best mysteries set below the surface, including stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, William Hope Hodgson, and R. Austin Freeman.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.7)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 2
4 7
4.5
5 2

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 163,372,085 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar