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King Richard III

von William Shakespeare

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
5,228761,516 (4)218
Richard III is one of Shakespeare's most popular plays on the stage and has been adapted successfully for film. This new and innovative edition recognizes the play's pre-eminence as a performance work: a perspective that informs every aspect of the editing. Challenging traditional practice,the text is based on the 1597 Quarto which, it is argued, brings us closest to the play as it would have been staged in Shakespeare's theatre. The introduction, which is illustrated, explores the long performance history from Shakespeare's time to the present. Its critical engagement with the playresponds to recent historicist and gender-based approaches. The commentary gives detailed explication of matters of language, staging, text, and historical and cultural contexts, providing coverage that is both carefully balanced and alert to nuance of meaning.Documentation of the extensive textual variants is organized for maximum clarity: the readings of the Folio and the Quarto are presented in separate banks, and more specialist information is given at the back of the book. Appendices also include selected passages from the main source and a specialindex of actors and other theatrical personnel.… (mehr)
  1. 20
    Alibi für einen König von Josephine Tey (bookwoman247)
    bookwoman247: This is a mystery involving Richard III and the two princes in the tower, and seems to have garnered a bit of respect. It's a great read on its own, and would make a great companion read to Shakespeare's Richard III.
  2. 00
    Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics von Stephen Greenblatt (M_Clark)
    M_Clark: This book by Stephen Greenblatt explains the political ideas of Shakespeare in a wonderfully readable book. Although many of the plays are discussed, he provides a great explanation to Henry VI and Richard III.
  3. 00
    Gesamtausgabe: König Heinrich VI., 3. Teil. Bd. 30 von William Shakespeare (M_Clark)
    M_Clark: I recently reread Richard III after reading Henry VI, part 3 and enjoyed it much more. First, the characters are more familiar since they play prominent roles in Henry VI. Second, the future Richard III begins his scheming in Henry VI, party 3.
  4. 00
    We Speak No Treason von Rosemary Hawley Jarman (KayCliff)
  5. 00
    Yorkists: The History of a Dynasty von Anne Crawford (KayCliff)
  6. 00
    The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England von Dan Jones (aquariumministry)
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Shakespeare's first no-qualifications, capital 'M' Masterpiece. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
As much as I’m a fan of historical fiction, Shakespeare’s interpretations seem to consistently do nothing but either piss me off or mildly bore me - Richard III being the former, as this story is nothing if not melodramatic. Overly so in a lot of ways, since Richard often comes off as an extreme case of a superficial villain what with his blatant asides about killing off literally everyone who doesn’t do what he wants (former allies are not excepted from this rule). Use, abuse, and then dispose seems to be his backing motto, and Shakespeare gives very little leeway from this theme in his almost-contemporary historical commentary. Obviously, those of us with some historical perspective (and who weren’t writing for the direct descendents of the Tudors who defeated Richard III at the finale of the Wars of the Roses) understand that the character of Richard of York is much more complex than he was portrayed by Shakespeare and other contemporaries, but this play still gives us an excellent example of just how much political propaganda was alive and well long before the modern day. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
[The Arden Shakespeare - King Richard III]
[Norton Critical Editions - Richard III - Shakespeare]
BBC The Tragedy of Richard III - William Shakespeare
I have been steeped in Shakespeares Richard III this week and steep is probably the word because it can seem like a long climb to the end. The play that has come down to us from the first folio edition is the second longest of Shakespeare's plays, only Hamlet is longer. The BBC production of the play clocks in at over 3 hours 45 minutes, but don't despair if you are going to see a live theatre production, as there is a good chance that it will have been cut. It has a history of being adapted for the stage, not only for it's length, but also to provide some information on whose who in the play, because it continues on from Shakespeare's Henry VI part III and following the history of the Wars of the Roses is complicated enough without coming in over half way through. From 1700 to the late nineteenth century the version performed would have been a rewrite by Colley Cibber: he incorporated parts of Henry VI part III, inserted some continuity into the text and made considerable cuts to the first folio edition, cutting all extraneous material to the main story of Richards rise and fall. I could appreciate why there could be a need to adapt the first folio edition when I read it through for the first time; certain scenes seem to be overlong and it can be difficult to distinguish the characters and there are references to what had gone on in the previous play.

The play remains the most performed of all Shakespeare's histories and that is probably because central to the play is the character of Richard III, probably the most evil genius ever to rule England according to Tudor propaganda and many people going to the theatre like to see a bad guy. Just what sort of evil genius you will see not only depends on the actors but also to the cuts made in the text. Cibber for example cut out Clarence's dream and his pleading with his murderers, the prattle with his children, the dialogue with the citizens, the cursing scene with Margaret and much of the scene with the Duchess of York, the spectres visiting the combatants tents at Bosworth field and much else. There was plenty of the play left, but the audience would not have seen Richard at his cleverest or most wittiest. There is much in the text that could be used to show Richard as a clever rogue, no better or worse than some of the other noble members of the houses of York and Lancaster, but if the aim of the production was to depict a malevolent and evil Machiavellian usurper of the crown then a more straightforward reading is possible, like that of Cibber's

The play opens with Richard's soliloquy and one of the most famous of Shakespeares lines:

"Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this son of York"


A soliloquy is a device for passing confidential information to the audience and Richard not only tells us about his feelings of inadequacy in times of peace, his physical deformities, but also of the plots he has laid to get rid of his brother:

"I am determined to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days"


The audience immediately knows where they are with Richard, which is more than the other characters do in the play. Richard plays to the gallery, which if there was not an audience that gallery would be only himself. He immediately convinces his brother Clarence he will do everything he can to get him released from the Tower (prison) and then hires a couple of ruffians to murder him. His finest feat of manipulation however is completed shortly afterwards. He joins the funeral cortege of Henry VI and sets out to seduce the Lady Anne who is mourning her husband Prince Edward who Richard killed at the battle of Tewksbury; Richard also killed her father and Anne also knows he killed Henry VI. Richard stops the cortège to speak to and seduce Ann who starts off by calling him a foul devil and black magician, but Richard's wit, his offer to kill himself and his protestations of love persuades Ann to accept his ring. He cannot help himself boasting to his audience:

"Was ever woman in this humour wooed?
Was ever woman in this humour won?
I'll have her, but I will not keep her long.


Richard is an extreme misogynist, blaming his mother for his deformities. His disdainful treatment of Anne is typical of him. There are however strong female characters in the play who confront Richard or who talk about him amongst themselves. It is the female parts of the play that often end up on the cutting room floor. The women have all suffered by Richards actions either because husbands have been killed or children murdered and it is their challenge to him and their curses against him that start his loosening of the grip of the kingship. Not including this aspect of the play is like not including a piece of the jigsaw.

The fascination and perhaps the difficulty of understanding Richard for a modern audience is that his character is partly based on an earlier trope that appears in morality plays or early Elizabethan theatre. Richard is of course a modern day Machiavellian character in his plotting and his lust for power, but he is also representative of Vice or Punch in morality plays and so he has the power to do and persuade others to do; things that appear a little far fetched for modern audiences. The characters on the stage know what Richard has done and what he is capable of doing and yet they are all susceptible to his charms. It is only Richmond (Henry Tudor) who is immune and who leads the final assault on Richard's crown. Richard is involved in everything, if he is not on stage then plots that he has set in motion are coming to fruition, or enemies are planning to get the better of him, or are talking about him. It is not quite a one man show, but not too far off. Against Richard it is the female characters who are the strongest.

There is not a high body count only two people die on stage: Clarence and Richard himself; the young princes of the tower are murdered off stage, but it is clear that Richard has arranged their deaths. There is no mystery, it is clear what Richard is doing, much of the power of the play is contained in Richards character and his presence and so it is the words, the wit, the language of the performers that holds the audiences attention. Watching the BBC production brought this home to me. It uses many of the same actors from the previous plays in the tetralogy and an amusing piece of casting is that the actors that play Richards two dead brothers and his father reappear as followers of the triumphant Henry Tudor at the end of the play.

The Arden Shakespeare as usual gives a full analysis of the text, as much information as you could possibly want and it has a good introduction that refers on to further reading if necessary. It gives a potted history of the performance of the play up to modern times. The Norton Critical edition gives very little help with the actual text, but is very good on context. For example it gives excerpts from Shakespeares source material and an Example from Colley Cibbers rewritten version. It also includes essays of criticism, which as usual are a mixed bag.

I found the full version of the play overly long, but it is such a powerful play that it is a 5 star read either in the Arden or the Norton edition. ( )
1 abstimmen baswood | Dec 4, 2020 |
H1.31.4 ( )
  David.llib.cat | Oct 15, 2020 |
H1.31.4
  David.llib.cat | Oct 15, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (86 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Shakespeare, WilliamHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Brissaud, PierreIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Day, GillianMitwirkenderCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Eccles, MarkHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Evans, G. BlakemoreHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Furness, Horace HowardHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Harrison, George B.GestaltungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Holland, PeterHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Holmberg, KalleÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Honigmann, E.A.J.HerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hudson, Henry N.HerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Jowett, JohnHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Lamar, VirginiaHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Newborn, SashaCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Ridley, M. R.HerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Rolfe, William J.HerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Rossi, MattiÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Taylor, MichaelHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Taylor, MichaelEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Wright, Louis B.HerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

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Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this son of York,
And all the clouds that loured upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Zitate
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An honest tale speeds best, being plainly told.
True hope is swift, and flies with swallow's wings;

Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings.
A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!
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This work is for the complete King Richard III only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or "simplifications" (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
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Richard III is one of Shakespeare's most popular plays on the stage and has been adapted successfully for film. This new and innovative edition recognizes the play's pre-eminence as a performance work: a perspective that informs every aspect of the editing. Challenging traditional practice,the text is based on the 1597 Quarto which, it is argued, brings us closest to the play as it would have been staged in Shakespeare's theatre. The introduction, which is illustrated, explores the long performance history from Shakespeare's time to the present. Its critical engagement with the playresponds to recent historicist and gender-based approaches. The commentary gives detailed explication of matters of language, staging, text, and historical and cultural contexts, providing coverage that is both carefully balanced and alert to nuance of meaning.Documentation of the extensive textual variants is organized for maximum clarity: the readings of the Folio and the Quarto are presented in separate banks, and more specialist information is given at the back of the book. Appendices also include selected passages from the main source and a specialindex of actors and other theatrical personnel.

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Ausgaben: 0140714839, 0141013036

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