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Klein Dorrit (1857)

von Charles Dickens

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
5,127801,741 (4)327
Charles Dickens: Klein Dorrit. Die Armut. Der Reichtum. Beide B nde in einem Buch Entstanden 1855-1857. Hier in einer bersetzung von Carl Kolb, Gutenberg-Verlag, Hamburg, 1927. Neuausgabe. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2016. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage unter Verwendung des Bildes: Edgar Degas, Kopf einer jungen Frau, 1867. Gesetzt aus der Minion Pro, 10.8 pt.… (mehr)
  1. 13
    Vernunft und Gefühl von Jane Austen (FutureMrsJoshGroban)
    FutureMrsJoshGroban: They are both wonderful love stories, and they are both my favorite books by the respective authors.
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UPDATE: 11/2020

I have upgraded my rating to 5-stars and feeling quite different toward both Amy Dorrit and the other characters of Little Dorrit this time around. I read the book very slowly (one chapter a day) with full discussions in the Dickensians group, and my appreciation of it rose daily. I'm afraid one read is just not enough for this complex and profound novel. My hat is always off to Mr. Dickens, one of the greatest writers of all time.

********************************

Dickens built his novel, Little Dorrit, around the life of inmates of the Marshalsea Prison, and drew from some very personal experiences to do so. I did not find these characters as compelling nor his plot as tight as usual, but still a worthy read and much enjoyed. Amy Dorrit (whose moniker of “Little Dorrit” aggravated me), is a bit too perfect, sweet and unselfish for my tastes; Arthur Clennam a bit too clueless about his own feelings and what was going on with others; and our major villain Rigaud a little too much like Snidely Whiplash, right down to the twisting of the moustache.

The loves and hates in this novel were also somewhat contrived. Of course, those emotions can be pretty arbitrary in real life. We’ve probably all known people who hate beyond the bounds of the offense they have endured and one person or another who has professed to love someone who was obviously a cad and below their worthiness. Mainly, however, I did not feel that the explanation for the mysteries at the heart of the novel really made good sense. So, not on a level with Great Expectations or Bleak House, but still...a bad Dickens is better than almost anyone else, it is the high expectations that cause the problem.

If you ever suffer from the idea that the problems of Charles Dickens’ world won’t have correlatives in our world, you ought to read Little Dorrit. Sprinkled amid the convoluted story of Amy Dorrit and Arthur Clennam is a diatribe on bureaucracy that felt far too familiar. Perhaps it is uniquely American (of course NOT) that people in government seem more interested in “not doing” than in “doing”, but I could so totally relate to the red tape approach to running off the petitioner, and I’m betting everyone else who has ever tried to deal with government can as well.

Hold up your hand if Mr. Rugg’s comments here ring true:

”If the money I have sacrificed had been all my own, Mr. Rugg,” sighed Mr. Clennam, “I should have cared far less.
“Indeed sir? said Mr. Rugg, rubbing his hands with a cheerful air. “You surprise me. That’s singular, sir. I have generally found, in my experience, that it’s their own money people are most particular about. I have seen people get rid of a good deal of other people’s money, and bear it very well; very well indeed.”


Oops, too many to count.

And, when I came across this passage, I could not help thinking of Bernie Madoff:

Numbers of men in every profession and trade would be blighted by his insolvency; old people who had been in easy circumstances all their lives would have no place of repentance for their trust in him but the workhouse; legions of women and children would have their whole future desolated by the hand of this mighty scoundrel. Every partaker of his magnificent feasts would be seen to have been a sharer in the plunder of innumerable homes, every servile worshipper of riches who had helped to set him on his pedestal, would have done better to worship the Devil point blank.

But what really struck me was that he was admired by one of the characters for pulling the deception off so universally, and I gasped because I had an acquaintance who actually made that statement about Madoff…"You have to admire him for his cleverness”, he said. NO, NO and NO. Would you not think people would have learned between 1855 and 2008? Apparently human nature thrives on the same errors repeated over centuries.

There is much that could be said about this novel and, like every Dickens I have read, it would make for a marvelous group read. If you want to know more and delve deeper, I strongly suggest that you take the time to read the review written by Bionic Jean, our resident Dickens guru, who never gets it wrong and always enlightens my reading.
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1705655726

I was afraid I was going to fail in my quest to read all of Dickens by culling two a year off my list. Thankfully, I have finished Little Dorrit just in time to satisfy this year. I read Hard Times as well. I have Martin Chuzzlewit, about which I know nothing, and The Old Curiosity Shop, a story I am very familiar with but have not ever read, slated for 2019. It would be lovely if I could up the ante and squeeze in a third! I must say I have enjoyed every single novel so far. ( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
This is classic Dickens with themes of the "poor" poor and anti-establishment. Nobody does it better than Dickens! Little Dorrit is Amy Dorrit, born in the Marshalsea debtor's prison. She "escapes" for a few short years and travels Europe, but returns when her family loses all their money (again), investing it in a bank that closes. There are many other quirky characters, one of which I don't understand really how they fit into the story, Monsieur Rigaud/Blandois/Lagnier, a murderer and blackmailer. IMHO this Dickens isn't as good as A Tale of Two Cities, Bleak House, or David Copperfield; but better than The Pickwick Papers or Oliver Twist, et.al. 893 pages ( )
  Tess_W | May 9, 2022 |
4/25/22
  laplantelibrary | Apr 25, 2022 |
The first 3rd had me thinking this would be my favorite Dickens novel. The middle made me wonder if I should see it through, but the last 3rd redeemed the whole. I guess my interest ebbed and flowed with the involvement of my favorite characters (Amy and Arthur). The last 3rd really pulled it all together nicely. ( )
  282Mikado | Apr 13, 2022 |
Lluïsa Cunillera versió, adaptació i pròleg ***
  sllorens | Nov 23, 2021 |
It tripped my social conscience and infected me for the rest of my life.
hinzugefügt von Cynfelyn | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Jon Snow (Nov 19, 1999)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (80 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Charles DickensHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Ferguson, AntonyReaderHauptautoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Lesser, AntonReaderHauptautoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Altick, Richard D.NachwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Browne, Hablôt K.IllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Frith, W.P.UmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hoffmann, Paul TheodorÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Holloway, JohnHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Kolb, CarlÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Preston, PeterHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Small, HelenEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Trilling, LionelEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Vance, SimonErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Wall, StephenHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Thirty years ago, Marseilles lay burning in the sun, one day.
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Indiani, russi, cinesi, spagnoli, portoghesi, inglesi, francesi, genovesi, napoletani, veneziani, greci, turchi, tutti i discendenti dei costruttori della Torre di Babele convenuti a Marsiglia per i loro commerci cercavano l'ombra …
Il tanfo della prigione gravava su ogni cosa. L'aria imprigionata, la luce imprigionata, l'umidità imprigionata, gli uomini imprigionati, tutto era degradato dalla reclusione. I prigionieri erano pallidi e sparuti come il ferro coperto di ruggine, la pietra viscida, il legno putrido, l'aria viziata e la luce opaca.
L'altro sputò e si raschiò la gola. Subito dopo s'udì anche una serratura raschiarsi la gola e una porta sbatté.
«Guarda la luce del giorno! Giorno! Questa è la luce di otto giorni fa, di sei mesi fa, di sei anni fa, tanto è debole e scialba!»
Era semplicemente un fanfarone, uno sfacciato millantatore; ma quanto a questo, e non solo a questo, in tutte le parti del mondo la sfacciataggine nell'affermare una cosa vale più d'una prova tangibile della sua realtà.
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Charles Dickens: Klein Dorrit. Die Armut. Der Reichtum. Beide B nde in einem Buch Entstanden 1855-1857. Hier in einer bersetzung von Carl Kolb, Gutenberg-Verlag, Hamburg, 1927. Neuausgabe. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2016. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage unter Verwendung des Bildes: Edgar Degas, Kopf einer jungen Frau, 1867. Gesetzt aus der Minion Pro, 10.8 pt.

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3 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Penguin Australia veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 0141439963, 0141037393, 0141199377

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