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Humankind: A Hopeful History von Rutger…
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Humankind: A Hopeful History (Original 2019; 2020. Auflage)

von Rutger Bregman (Autor), Erica Moore (Übersetzer), Elizabeth Manton (Übersetzer)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
6962125,484 (4.29)14
Mitglied:harvrabb
Titel:Humankind: A Hopeful History
Autoren:Rutger Bregman (Autor)
Weitere Autoren:Erica Moore (Übersetzer), Elizabeth Manton (Übersetzer)
Info:Little, Brown and Company (2020), Edition: Illustrated, 480 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:to-read, From GR

Werk-Informationen

Humankind: A Hopeful History von Rutger Bregman (2019)

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https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3764640.html

the end of last year I read and largely enjoyed Bregman's Utopia for Realists. This has a grander sweep - the story of how humanity is much nicer and well-intentioned than people think. With some detail, he debunks the Stanford prison experiment, the Milgram electric shock experiment, and the Kitty Genovese case; and looks at the true story of the shipwrecked kids who failed to go Lord of the Flies and at various other statistics supporting his thesis. Fundamentally I want to agree with the book; I'd much rather that people are nice to each other. And mostly it's convincing; what is lacking is an answer to the Problem of Evil, though I guess that the point of the book is more the Invisible Prevalence of Good. ( )
  nwhyte | Sep 25, 2021 |
The thesis of Rutger Bregman's book is that the vast majority of human beings the vast majority of the time have good intentions. Not only that, but scientific research backs up this optimistic perception of human goodness. Furthermore, trusting in the goodness of others is key to the health and success of individuals and societies. It is the belief that humankind is inherently corrupt that is often manipulated to have people carry out evil. Accepting the "veneer theory" that human society is only a thin layer over the cruel and selfish human psyche is akin to the placebo effect, or in this case what Bregman calls the "nocebo" for its negative psychological effects.

Bregman breaks down what we "know" about human behavior by debunking a number of famed studies such as Stanley Milgram's obedience tests and the Stanford Prison Experiment, as well as histories of the collapse of indigenous society on Easter Island and the popular story of neighbors indifference to the murder of Kitty Genovese. After reading the truth behind these stories and how they were manipulated to make the worst possible reading, you might find yourself thinking humans are good but psychologists and journalists are evil.Bregman also contrasts the fictional Lord of the Flies with the real-life experience of Tongan boys who survived being stranded on a desert island for a year through cooperation.

After showing that many cases of humans descending to "savagery" actually had many instances of people wanting to help out, Bregman also explores experimental camps, schools and workplaces where children and adults are trusted to do the right thing with positive results. Bregman builds on existing philosophy, often contrasting the views of humanity of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Thomas Hobbes. He also draws on evolutionary biology that shows that cooperation was necessary for human survival and the desire to help is hardwired into humanity.

This is just the kind of book I needed to read right now and it's something I think everyone ought to read.

Favorite Passages:
Tine De Moor calls for"institutional diversity" - "while markets work best in some cases and state control is better in others, underpinning it all there has to be a strong communal foundation of citizens who decide to work together." ( )
1 abstimmen Othemts | Aug 24, 2021 |
Christianity presents humanity as fallen creatures with an inherent 'sin nature' which required killing all of them but one family and starting over. It didn't fix things though, because it didn't cleanse the sin nature. The Bible is full of rules and regulations to keep us in line. Eventually God had to kill his own son to somehow justify not killing all of the rest of us again.

This is the way most people, even non-christians, view humanity. We all have evil in our hearts, just waiting to pop out given the opportunity.

And yet actual history shows us that this is not true. Man is inherently good and requires manipulation to be otherwise.

All of this is a general rule, not an all-or-nothing proposition.

Summary: humankind is generally one of two different natures:

1 - Naturally evil, requiring oversight and manipulation in order to be civilized, or;
2 - Naturally good, requiring peer pressure and manipulation in order to be evil.

Rutger Bregman makes the argument for the second option, and it is a very solid argument. I'm convinced!

The book ends with 10 rules to live by, and I have found them challenging and intriguing. This book is staying with me and I think of it almost every day. ( )
  donblanco | Jul 15, 2021 |
“What if propaganda not only sows discord, but can also bring people back together...”

This line from the book defines the core of what I grasped from Brugman’s writing style. The underlying intent of the book is to make us aware that yes, in a certain sense, he is writing a "propaganda piece"; he is spinning the narrative to promote his new realism. He is speaking of alternate facts to well-known truisms about human nature (we are always one small step away from lie, kill, cheat, steal). He is claiming that its time to get real: by seeing our fellow humans as friendly, helpful, kind, and peaceful, and, by spreading this news to others in real-time, we can shape a new reality though what he calls new realism. "The war is over, if you want it." But it won't end until we actively participate in forming such a reality.

What is this new realism? If you have read his Utopia for Realists you might be familiar with proposals for a shorter workweek; basic income; open borders. In Humankind, he opens up our personal borders and allows us to let others in. There is very little sentimental writing or empathetic reasoning. His is a new realism, yes. And this realism is so surprisingly realistic that it can easily seem idealistic. And he backs up his words with deep research.

He provides ample evidence that it can work and does work. His alternate facts are such that debunk others’ spun facts (see the original version vs Brugman's version of prison experiments, Lord of the Flies, Kitty Genovese). Bregman even calls out historians such as Harari and Diamond for weak research points. Where they seem to take for granted certain historical accounts, Bregman gracefully calls out where stories are born and he rewrites these myths. And they seem all the more realistic as he provides ample evidence for his case.

This is one of Harari’s central tropes: that we tell ourselves stories. We heard it on the news, we saw it on YouTube and ... even if we don't believe it is true... we are still right in the midst of it. The stories we tell ourselves created money, society, religions. Bregman says its time to tune out from the stories others form for us, to tune out from the harmful news and online activity and tune into what is right in front of us. And, as Harari (though still vegan and trim and stoic) and kin grow larger in fame…certain storylines will be formed just as a canal is formed; some will be true and some will form into myth. Bregman is a tributary of these recent giants in intuitive-intellectual presentation and has this reader/reviewer interested in the streaming waters of this newly dug out waterbed. Thinking of making my home in his waters. The great thing about all of these streams is that they are all headed in the right direction. They swim against the waters, struggling to get upstream…once there, they reach new islands that promote a better vision. Bregman’s stories may also become mythic once he rises in popularity, and he is not without critics. But in a cosmos of cluttered, divisive thought, his hopeful history is a welcome one.

This life stance of trusting others, seeing innocence before guilt, avoiding sensationalist news, personal gain…this has been my point of view throughout my life. Yes, at times I have been dominated, cheated, left behind, left bereft. But it has always felt true to me…it just seems realistic. “to believe people are hardwired to be kind isn’t sentimental or naive. ..it’s courageous and realistic to believe in peace and forgiveness.” I have been afraid to speak this point of view, fearful that this realism is too idealistic for our times. Brugman has helped me to internally articulate this position of “new realism” …now it’s time to let others know too. ( )
1 abstimmen DouglasDuff | Jun 21, 2021 |
Geschiedenis van de mens, en een blik op de toekomst ( )
  huizenga | Jun 5, 2021 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (14 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Bregman, RutgerHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Jonkers, AndreasHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Medendorp, HarminkeHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Buchbeschreibung
Der Historiker und Journalist Rutger Bregman setzt sich in seinem neuen Buch mit dem Wesen des Menschen auseinander. Anders als in der westlichen Denktradition angenommen ist der Mensch seinen Thesen nach nicht böse, sondern im Gegenteil: von Grund auf gut. Und geht man von dieser Prämisse aus, ist es möglich, die Welt und den Menschen in ihr komplett neu und grundoptimistisch zu denken. In seinem mitreißend geschriebenen, überzeugenden Buch präsentiert Bregman Ideen für die Verbesserung der Welt. Sie sind innovativ und mutig und stimmen vor allem hoffnungsfroh.
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