StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Hamnet (2020)

von Maggie O'Farrell

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,7951297,269 (4.25)304
"A thrilling departure: a short, piercing, deeply moving novel about the death of Shakespeare's 11 year old son Hamnet--a name interchangeable with Hamlet in 15th century Britain--and the years leading up to the production of his great play. England, 1580. A young Latin tutor--penniless, bullied by a violent father--falls in love with an extraordinary, eccentric young woman--a wild creature who walks her family's estate with a falcon on her shoulder and is known throughout the countryside for her unusual gifts as a healer. Agnes understands plants and potions better than she does people, but once she settles with her husband on Henley Street in Stratford she becomes a fiercely protective mother and a steadfast, centrifugal force in the life of her young husband, whose gifts as a writer are just beginning to awaken when his beloved young son succumbs to bubonic plague. A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a hypnotic recreation of the story that inspired one of the greatest masterpieces of all time, Hamnet is mesmerizing, seductive, impossible to put down--a magnificent departure from one of our most gifted novelists"--… (mehr)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Really loved this book, the ending was emotional for one who loves Shakespeare plays, and Hamlet in particular. Enjoyed how it was a look at the famous Bard from a different perspective. ( )
  Whitecat82 | Oct 18, 2021 |
I found this a remarkable and fascinating book, but hard to explain. The story weaves between earlier when Agnes meets her future husband, to their present time, to their children. With each shift, we are given a window into why things happened as they did. There is an interesting explanation mid book that shifts away from the family and their lives, to illustrate how the plague came to spread by a random, chance meeting of two people. This book deals a lot about grief and misunderstanding and loneliness. ( )
  cjyap1 | Oct 17, 2021 |
This is a well-written enjoyable book about the people almost forgotten by history. O'Farrell has taken the sketchy details available about Agnes and Hamnet and woven an atmospheric and emotional book about them. However the mistake I made was going straight from reading this to my re-read of Wolf Hall, which is historical fiction just on another level. I also felt the characters weren't always consistent or historically convincing - death is a common place and everyday thing, yet only the death of Hamnet seems to bother anyone deeply. We are invited to be sympathetic with Agnes in her deep and appalling grief, but not with other mothers who have lost multiple children and grieve less. This sounds more critical than it should, I did really like this book. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Oct 16, 2021 |
Maggie O’Farrell is a poetic and empathetic writer, and yet there are a few things that hold me back from fully appreciating this book.
First the good stuff. O’Farrell writes such rich, descriptive prose that, as a reader, I could sense the scene and the characters in a very concrete way. When she describes the herbs or the birds or the room, in a few words she brings an image to mind that places the story in a setting that simply seems very real. I kept thinking that she must have been there to catch those details. Although in the credits at the end of the book she lists a lot of printed references and she describes visiting the sites in Stratford, she writes with such detail that it’s hard to imagine that she’s not writing from a lot of close personal experience.
Even with that skill, though, I sometimes felt that a few words from an editor would have helped. When she makes metaphors, they sometimes seem overdrawn, like “the dark maw of the ground, ripped open to accept the white wrapped body in the grave.” Does this have an emotional resonance for readers? Perhaps, but graves in my mind are very neatly dug and describing them as ripped open seems to stretch reality for the sake of an artistic expression. It’s jarring and distracting, not illuminating. Several times through the book, I found myself thinking that the artful language is getting in the way of the response that I imagine O’Farrell wanted.
O’Farrell conveys a deep sense of the emotions of her central character. Agnes’ feelings about her family, her husband, and her situation are complex, but clear and real. Her relationship with her taciturn brother, for example, is interesting in how well they understand each other, even with few words spoken. At the centre of the story is her grief at the death of her son, and I can understand the depth of her loss and how it overpowers her. It may seem extreme, but we already know from her relationship with her stepmother and her birth stories that Agnes is a person of unusual intensity and connectedness. An extreme reaction seems right in character.
O’Farrell gives a similar emotional sense to several other characters. Hamnet’s devotion to his twin sister and his sacrifice to save her, and later Judith’s searching for the spirit of the dead Hamnet seem a natural part of their character. Their father is one of the least known characters, initially a young man of little spirit, and later a business man with a close feeling for his family. Overall, however, we get little sense of his interior thinking. This is an interesting choice, to deliberately take the attention away from the most famous historical character and focus on the unknown background players.
But this empathic acuity leads to another issue for me. In many respects, these characters seem to be modern people in a 17th century society. The long picture of Agnes’ grief could be reset with equal impact in a contemporary family. While Agnes is an expert herbalist, she thinks and reacts in the way a 21st century person would, essentially individualized and material. She has no real community connections and no relationship to the Christian god. Of course, this involves broad generalizations, but could a post-medieval woman go through all that Agnes experiences without reference to community or church (beyond a perfunctory funeral and burial)? Ahistorical characterization often seems to be a problem in writing historical novels, although I think Hillary Mantel avoids it in her books about Thomas Cromwell. She is deliberately exploring the development of the modern mind in the same period, and for me she is more successful in creating a historical character than O’Farrell is. This leads me to ask, why put a modern character in a 400-year-old setting and write as if the character’s psyche is not part of that setting?
Although O’Farrell’s occasional over-writing and her ahistorical characters are flaws to me, there are so many things in her writing that I really like that I’d be interested to read more of her writing to see how she handles other circumstances. ( )
  rab1953 | Oct 15, 2021 |
Hamnet has the most beautifully strung together sentences. Maggie O'Farrell is a wonderful wordsmith, weaving together scenes and characters in a way that kept me turning the pages. The scenes where the family is traveling to the church to bury their child and when Agnes sees Hamlet on stage are ones that will never leave my mind. My heart broke for different reasons (some sadness, some happiness).

The ending is my favorite part of the book, for sure. I don't want to give it away, but if you struggled a bit, like me, to get to the end of this tale, just keep reading. The last four pages are amazing.

I recommend Hamnet to fans of historical fiction, William Shakespeare, and family dramas. ( )
  mrstreme | Oct 13, 2021 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
O'Farrell, MaggieHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Vries, Willemijn deErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
He is dead and gone, lady,
He is dead and gone;
At his head a grass-green turf,
At his heels a stone. 

Hamlet, Act IV, scene v
Hamnet and Hamlet are in fact the same name, entirely interchangeable in Stratford records in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

—Steven Greenblatt, "The Death of Hamnet and the Making of Hamlet," New York Review of Books (October 21, 2004)
I am dead:
Thou livest;
. . . draw thy breath in pain,
To tell my story

      —Hamlet, Act V, scene ii
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To Will
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
A boy is coming down a flight of stairs.
Zitate
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Agnes believes her position, as new daughter-in-law, to be ambiguous, somewhere between apprentice and hen.
The branches of the forest are so dense you cannot feel the rain.
There will be no going back. No undoing of what was laid out for them. The boy has gone and the husband will leave and she will stay and the pigs will need to be fed every day and time runs only one way.
What is the word, Judith asks her mother, for someone who was a twin but is no longer a twin?
... If you were a wife , Judith continues, and your husband dies, then you are a widow. And if its parents die, a child becomes an orphan. But what is the word for what I am? ... Maybe there isn't one, she suggests.
Maybe not, says her mother.
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

"A thrilling departure: a short, piercing, deeply moving novel about the death of Shakespeare's 11 year old son Hamnet--a name interchangeable with Hamlet in 15th century Britain--and the years leading up to the production of his great play. England, 1580. A young Latin tutor--penniless, bullied by a violent father--falls in love with an extraordinary, eccentric young woman--a wild creature who walks her family's estate with a falcon on her shoulder and is known throughout the countryside for her unusual gifts as a healer. Agnes understands plants and potions better than she does people, but once she settles with her husband on Henley Street in Stratford she becomes a fiercely protective mother and a steadfast, centrifugal force in the life of her young husband, whose gifts as a writer are just beginning to awaken when his beloved young son succumbs to bubonic plague. A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a hypnotic recreation of the story that inspired one of the greatest masterpieces of all time, Hamnet is mesmerizing, seductive, impossible to put down--a magnificent departure from one of our most gifted novelists"--

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (4.25)
0.5 2
1 2
1.5 1
2 12
2.5 9
3 52
3.5 30
4 151
4.5 73
5 221

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 163,249,492 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar