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Skleněný klíč von Dashiell…
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Skleněný klíč (Original 1931; 1981. Auflage)

von Dashiell Hammett, Svatopluk Dolejš

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,839437,107 (3.68)91
Paul Madvig was a cheerfully corrupt ward-heeler who aspired to something better: the daughter of Senator Ralph Bancroft Henry, the heiress to a dynasty of political purebreds. Did he want her badly enough to commit murder? And if Madvig was innocent, which of his dozens of enemies was doing an awfully good job of framing him?… (mehr)
Mitglied:TheGreenCZ
Titel:Skleněný klíč
Autoren:Dashiell Hammett
Weitere Autoren:Svatopluk Dolejš
Info:Praha : Svoboda, 1981
Sammlungen:obývák
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Informationen

Der gläserne Schlüssel von Dashiell Hammett (1931)

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Dashiell Hammett's fourth novel is many things. Apart from the two Continental Op adventures (Red Harvest and The Dain Curse), it's his most hard-boiled book. And it happened to be the author's favorite among his own works: with characteristic understatement, he deemed it "not so bad". But it's also the least formulaic of Hammett's novels, lacking a detective or even a readily identifiable hero. For that reason, perhaps, fans are not vocally enthusiastic about it...and critics, while generally agreeing that it's superior to Hammett's final novel The Thin Man (which they dismiss as fluff), also seem to be baffled by The Glass Key.

Personally I don't think it's a difficult book to understand, and neither did Raymond Chandler, who called it "the record of a man's devotion to a friend". There you have it. Specifically, a murder which could adversely affect the career and personal life of political boss Paul Madvig is investigated by Madvig's friend, mustachioed racketeer Ned Beaumont. Though his nerves are sensitive and he seems unable to consume much liquor without vomiting, Beaumont has to be outwardly tough to overcome the obstacles he meets everywhere. It's a realistic novel, often jarringly so, and I enjoyed it very much. Read it and see what you think. (The 1942 film version, directed by Stuart Heisler and starring Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake, is good and almost entirely faithful to Hammett's novel.) ( )
  Jonathan_M | Nov 12, 2021 |
Love Triangle

As a caution, if you have not yet read The Glass Key (and really, why haven’t you?), you may wish to wait on this as it does contain spoilers.

Once upon a time, in a small city somewhere in America, a boss ran a city with liberal doses of money and violence. His loyal henchman watched the boss’s back for him, and the boss treated the henchman as a member of his family. The henchman called the boss’s mother, who lived with the boss, “Mom,” and the boss’s daughter “Snip.” When the boss decided to upgrade his standing by courting and eventually marrying a senator’s daughter, the henchman stood by the boss, even though he himself seemed to have feelings for the young woman. When the daughter’s brother, who was courting the boss’s daughter to the displeasure of the boss, turned up dead and everybody turned on the boss, believing he had murdered the brother, the henchman stood by the boss. His loyalty to the boss and his family was so fierce nothing could dissuade him of the boss’s innocence. He set about to prove it to everybody who doubted, sustained some brutal abuse, and dished some out as well. In the end, though, he proved that the boss indeed was an innocent man, at least of this one crime. But in proving it, he severed connections to the boss, maybe severed forever, when in the end he revealed to the boss that he was leaving town and taking the young woman the boss had set his heart on with him. Yet, we were all left to wonder, who, in fact, did the henchman love truly, the boss or the girl, when at that fateful moment with the boss exiting out the door, the girl looked at the henchman and the henchman stared unwaveringly at the vanishing boss.

Dashiell Hammett’s The Glass Key is at once a superb novel about mob corruption in a small city, the ruthlessness of gangsters, the vacillating loyalty of paid-off pols and cops, and the casual acceptance of murder, unless it involves a member of the elite class, and the disturbing idea that nobody is above, at least for long, their basest emotions and motivations. Underneath all that there simmers another story, a love affair so faint it barely takes shape during the course of the action, and then crystalizes at the very end as the reader is about to close the book in the last two sentences. As a warning, here follows those last two sentences featuring Janet Henry, the girl, Ned Beaumont, the henchman, and just exited Paul Madvig, the boss, that those who have not read the novel might like to avert their eyes from: “Janet Henry looked at Ned Beaumont. He stared fixedly at the door.”

The Thin Man and The Maltese Falcon are both achievements and tutorials in the art of hard boiled detective fiction, but The Glass Key may be Dashiell Hammett’s true masterpiece of crime noir. It’s a must-read for anybody interested in the genre, and for everybody interested in fine, restrained, and subtle writing. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Love Triangle

As a caution, if you have not yet read The Glass Key (and really, why haven’t you?), you may wish to wait on this as it does contain spoilers.

Once upon a time, in a small city somewhere in America, a boss ran a city with liberal doses of money and violence. His loyal henchman watched the boss’s back for him, and the boss treated the henchman as a member of his family. The henchman called the boss’s mother, who lived with the boss, “Mom,” and the boss’s daughter “Snip.” When the boss decided to upgrade his standing by courting and eventually marrying a senator’s daughter, the henchman stood by the boss, even though he himself seemed to have feelings for the young woman. When the daughter’s brother, who was courting the boss’s daughter to the displeasure of the boss, turned up dead and everybody turned on the boss, believing he had murdered the brother, the henchman stood by the boss. His loyalty to the boss and his family was so fierce nothing could dissuade him of the boss’s innocence. He set about to prove it to everybody who doubted, sustained some brutal abuse, and dished some out as well. In the end, though, he proved that the boss indeed was an innocent man, at least of this one crime. But in proving it, he severed connections to the boss, maybe severed forever, when in the end he revealed to the boss that he was leaving town and taking the young woman the boss had set his heart on with him. Yet, we were all left to wonder, who, in fact, did the henchman love truly, the boss or the girl, when at that fateful moment with the boss exiting out the door, the girl looked at the henchman and the henchman stared unwaveringly at the vanishing boss.

Dashiell Hammett’s The Glass Key is at once a superb novel about mob corruption in a small city, the ruthlessness of gangsters, the vacillating loyalty of paid-off pols and cops, and the casual acceptance of murder, unless it involves a member of the elite class, and the disturbing idea that nobody is above, at least for long, their basest emotions and motivations. Underneath all that there simmers another story, a love affair so faint it barely takes shape during the course of the action, and then crystalizes at the very end as the reader is about to close the book in the last two sentences. As a warning, here follows those last two sentences featuring Janet Henry, the girl, Ned Beaumont, the henchman, and just exited Paul Madvig, the boss, that those who have not read the novel might like to avert their eyes from: “Janet Henry looked at Ned Beaumont. He stared fixedly at the door.”

The Thin Man and The Maltese Falcon are both achievements and tutorials in the art of hard boiled detective fiction, but The Glass Key may be Dashiell Hammett’s true masterpiece of crime noir. It’s a must-read for anybody interested in the genre, and for everybody interested in fine, restrained, and subtle writing. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Taylor Henry, senator's son is dead. Murdered. Everybody believes that Paul Madvig killed him. But not his friend Ned Beaumont, so he investigates.
Who are the good guys, who are the bad, the line is very blurred.
A story of city politics, loyalties challenged or changed, betrayal everywhere
Originally written in 1931.
A re-read of another Hammett story ( )
  Vesper1931 | Jul 29, 2021 |
Seleccions la cua de palla
  Segudet | Dec 17, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (19 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Dashiell HammettHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Aristovulos, NickUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
McNeilly, EllenUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Wollschlaeger, HansÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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To Nell Martin
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Grüne Würfel rollten über den grünen Tisch, trafen zusammen auf den Rand und prallten zurück.
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Paul Madvig was a cheerfully corrupt ward-heeler who aspired to something better: the daughter of Senator Ralph Bancroft Henry, the heiress to a dynasty of political purebreds. Did he want her badly enough to commit murder? And if Madvig was innocent, which of his dozens of enemies was doing an awfully good job of framing him?

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Durchschnitt: (3.68)
0.5
1 14
1.5
2 22
2.5 3
3 90
3.5 30
4 132
4.5 15
5 68

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