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Klara and the Sun

von Kazuo Ishiguro

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
2,9091604,011 (3.9)1 / 225
Klara ist ein Artificial Friend, eine künstliche Intelligenz, die dafür entwickelt wurde, Jugendlichen eine Gefährtin zu sein auf dem Weg ins Erwachsenwerden. Von ihrem Platz im Schaufenster eines Spielzeuggeschäfts aus beobachtet sie ganz genau, was draussen vor sich geht, studiert das Verhalten der Kundinnen und Kunden und hofft darauf, bald von einem jungen Menschen als neue Freundin ausgewählt zu werden. Als sich ihr Wunsch endlich erfüllt und ein Mädchen sie mit nach Hause nimmt, muss sie jedoch bald feststellen, dass sie auf die Versprechen von Menschen nicht allzu viel geben sollte.Ishiguro zeigt die Abgründe unserer Gesellschaft durch die Augen einer künstlichen Itelligenz… (mehr)
Kürzlich hinzugefügt vonquenstalof, JoeB1934, mckinlay, PaulCohen, gdmf, Izreality, private Bibliothek, honeydues
  1. 61
    Alles, was wir geben mussten von Kazuo Ishiguro (JGoto)
    JGoto: Style and themes are similar in both of these novels by Ishigura.
  2. 32
    Blumen für Algernon von Daniel Keyes (Othemts)
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In this beautifully sensitive novel, Ishiguro explores the intersection between AI and spirituality: will AI be able to experience fundamental human notions such as hope, sacrifice, faith? Through Klara's brilliant yet fragmented mind, we follow Josie, her human, to her recovery and Klara's ultimate redundancy. The parallel conversation of robot vs human which is hinted at is nowhere near as interesting as Klara trying to understand the human heart.
It's a beautiful piece of writing which sometimes almost reads like a play: it's intimate, and the world seems staged as Klara watches it though her binary mind. Other themes include ethics, mortality and remembrance... it really delivers a punch. ( )
  Cecilturtle | Oct 4, 2022 |
In this beautifully written, but somewhat unsatisfying novel, Klara, a robot “artificial friend”, or AF, bargains with the sun to save the life of her mistress, a teenage girl named Josie. Awkward but loyal Klara has a compelling narrative voice, but there were a few plot holes (most notably: why, if her genes have been edited, or “lifted”, is Josie so fragile? Has society agreed that it is a worthwhile trade-off to make some young people smarter at the risk of their dying during adolescence? . Moreover, I would have liked more details about the story’s technologically advanced but dystopian setting. The narrative never answered the most basic of questions: why do children in this society need artificial friends, anyway?

I wonder if Kazuo Ishiguro was listening to the Dire Straits song “Romeo and Juliet” when determining the fate of the novel’s young lovers. Rick’s and Josie’s initials are even the same as those of the better-known literary couple, but Klara’s human friend and her boyfriend don’t end up quite as Shakespeare imagined.

All in all, a good read, if you don’t think about the details too much. ( )
  akblanchard | Sep 26, 2022 |
In Klara and the Sun, we listen to a story told by a robot, or an artificial friend, as she retells her life. We start out in the shop with the other AFs and Manager, then (spoilers) we follow Klara as she befriends a young girl named Josie. I really enjoyed seeing the way Klara views the world as an AF, everything is put into boxes, and her amazing observational skills allow her to study human emotions. I found out that the author, Kazuo Ishiguro, has a child with autism, and I wondered if the robot was Kazuo's way of explaining how someone with autism might perceive emotions, I thought it was an interesting connection. Obviously autism is a wide spectrum and not everyone will feel the same way. The New Yorker describes it as "Nabokovian estrangement," after a famous poem from the late 70's, Craig Raine’s poem “A Martian Sends a Postcard Home," influenced many writers, including Nabokov.

"The poem systematically deploys the technique of estrangement or defamiliarization—what the Russian formalist critics called ostranenie—as our bemused Martian wrestles into his comprehension a series of puzzling human habits and gadgets."

In Vladimir Nabokov's “Pnin” (1957), "estrangement is the condition and the sentence of the novel’s hapless hero, the Russian émigré professor Timofey Pnin. In Tolstoyan fashion, Pnin is seeing America as if for the first time, and often gets it wrong."

Ishiguro embraces this de-familiarized prose through Klara's observations about the world around her. I thoroughly enjoyed the novel, especially with such an ambiguous ending. I have read multiple interpretations, and still have not decided what I believe. I might update this review later. ( )
1 abstimmen Vanessa_Leigh | Sep 10, 2022 |
Best for:
Those who like deep, emotional, thoughtful novels that are more character driven than plot-driven.

In a nutshell:
Klara is an AF waiting to be chosen by a child.

Why I chose it:
Never Let Me Go remains one of my absolute favorite novels. I saw all the great reviews this one was getting and decided to pick it up.

Review:
It’s hard to speak about specifics in this book without spoiling it, so … I think I’m going to spoil it. Before the spoilers begin though, I can say that I enjoyed this book, I thought it was interesting and raised some amazing questions even beyond the one in the blurb: ‘What does it mean to love?’

Okay, now spoilers.

* * *

The only quibble I have with this book is the first part - the part set in the store. I understand why it is there, and it definitely does give us insight into not only Klara but the world that allows for a Klara to exist, but I didn’t enjoy reading it much. Once she was chosen by Josie, however, I was sucked in.

It wasn’t until the end of the book that I actually understood what ‘lifted’ meant (at least, I think), and that the decision to genetically alter the children was what killed Josie’s sister and was close to killing her, and that Rick’s mother had chosen not to follow that route. A society where this is not only normal but apparently a prerequisite for ‘success’ in life is terrifying. And the fact that it can lead to death - that parents are willing to risk death rather than allow their children to exist without genetic modification.

The concept of AFs (I assume Artificial Friends) is also terrifying. I mean, I get it - society seems to have gotten used to AI in things like website chatbots. But having one assigned as a friend, to watch over one’s child, essentially spying on them, but also maybe being their servant? Yikes. Especially given all we come to know about Klara and how she can think and feel. She is brilliant in so many ways, but she doesn’t have a full view of the world, and her obsession with and treatment of the sun as a god is fascinating but also feels almost child-like. She can gain knowledge but it seems as though she can’t quite gain the maturity that would allow her to be more like an adult. And maybe that isn’t a bad thing, because so many people become crueler and less hopeful as adults.

The ‘portrait’ storyline also lead me to actually drop my jaw. Like, the idea that the AF could learn who Josie was by interacting with and studying her for a few years, and then ultimately BECOME her was chilling. I’m not a parent but I still think I can understand the visceral appeal of having a way to not lose one’s daughter (reminds be of a film I watched on AppleTV earlier this year - Swan Song), but wow that seems so extreme.

And the very, very last few pages? Broke my heart.

There is so much going on in this world, and it’s amazing how Ishiguro can build this world where there really are only a handful of characters we get to meet. Nothing is so explicit, and there is very little exposition. And yet I can picture the home, the town, and the society so very clearly.

This book will stick with me for awhile.

Recommend to a Friend / Keep / Donate it / Toss it:
Recommend and Donate ( )
  ASKelmore | Aug 14, 2022 |
Some good insights...I liked Klara, hard to make a 'robot' sympathetic, but he did it...don't know if I could recommend to friends. ( )
  almin | Aug 13, 2022 |
In de licht dystopische roman voert Ishiguro een balanseer act uit op de rand van kitch. Hij slaagt er echter op een uitzonderlijke wijze in om in evenwicht te blijven. Klara en de zon is een zeer geslaagde, enigszins verontrustende en gelaagde nieuwe roman van de meesterverteller en Nobelprijswinnaar…lees verder>
 
Most of Ishiguro’s novels are slender books that are more complicated than they at first seem; Klara and the Sun is by contrast more simple than it seems, less novel than parable. Though much is familiar here—the restrained language, the under-stated first-person narration—the new book is much more overt than its predecessors about its concerns.... Ishiguro is unsentimental—indeed, one of the prevailing criticisms of him is that he’s too cold, his novels overly designed, his language detached. (Some of the worst writing on Ishiguro ascribes this to his being Japanese, overlooking that he’s lived in England since he was a small child.) In most hands, this business of the mother-figure who sacrifices all for a child would be mawkish. Here it barely seems like metaphor. Every parent has at times felt like an automaton. Every parent has pleaded with some deity for the safety of their child. Every parent is aware of their own, inevitable obsolescence. And no child can offer more than Josie’s glib goodbye, though perhaps Ishiguro wants to; the book is dedicated to his mother.
hinzugefügt von Lemeritus | bearbeitenThe New Republic, Rumaan Alam (Apr 11, 2021)
 
It explores many of the subjects that fill our news feeds, from artificial intelligence to meritocracy. Yet its real political power lies not in these topical references but in its quietly eviscerating treatment of love. Through Klara, Josie, and Chrissie, Ishiguro shows how care is often intertwined with exploitation, how love is often grounded in selfishness ... this book focuses on those we exploit primarily for emotional labor and care work—a timely commentary during a pandemic in which the essential workers who care for us are too often treated as disposable ... If Never Let Me Go demonstrates how easily we can exploit those we never have to see, Klara and the Sun shows how easily we can exploit even those we claim to love ... a story as much about our own world as about any imagined future, and it reminds us that violence and dehumanization can also come wrapped in the guise of love.
hinzugefügt von Lemeritus | bearbeitenThe Nation, Katie Fitzpatrick (Mar 24, 2021)
 
... the real power of this novel: Ishiguro’s ability to embrace a whole web of moral concerns about how we navigate technological advancements, environmental degradation and economic challenges even while dealing with the unalterable fact that we still die.... tales of sensitive robots determined to help us survive our self-destructive impulses are not unknown in the canon of science fiction. But Ishiguro brings to this poignant subgenre a uniquely elegant style and flawless control of dramatic pacing. In his telling, Klara’s self-abnegation feels both ennobling and tragic.
hinzugefügt von Lemeritus | bearbeitenThe Washington Post, Ron Charles (Mar 2, 2021)
 
Critics often note Ishiguro’s use of dramatic irony, which allows readers to know more than his characters do. And it can seem as if his narrators fail to grasp the enormity of the injustices whose details they so meticulously describe. But I don’t believe that his characters suffer from limited consciousness. I think they have dignity. Confronted by a complete indifference to their humanity, they choose stoicism over complaint. We think we grieve for them more than they grieve for themselves, but more heartbreaking is the possibility that they’re not sure we differ enough from their overlords to understand their true sorrow. And maybe we don’t, and maybe we can’t. Maybe that’s the real irony, the way Ishiguro sticks in the shiv.... In Klara and the Sun, Ishiguro leaves us suspended over a rift in the presumptive order of things. Whose consciousness is limited, ours or a machine’s? Whose love is more true? If we ever do give robots the power to feel the beauty and anguish of the world we bring them into, will they murder us for it or lead us toward the light?
hinzugefügt von Lemeritus | bearbeitenThe Atlantic, Judith Shulevitz (Mar 2, 2021)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (12 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Kazuo IshiguroHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Siu, SuraErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

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In memory of my mother
Shizuko Ishiguro
(1926-2019)
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When we were new, Rosa and I were mid-store, on the magazines table side, and could see through more than half of the window.
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We're both of us sentimental. We can't help it. Our generation still carry the old feelings. A part of us refuses to let go. The part that wants to keep believing there's something unreachable inside each of us. Something that's unique and won't transfer. But there's nothig like that, we know that now. (68%)
Mr Capaldi believed there was nothing special inside Josie that couldn’t be continued. He told the Mother he’d searched and searched and found nothing like that. But I believe now he was searching in the wrong place. There was something very special, but it wasn’t inside Josie. It was inside those who loved her. (98%)
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Klara ist ein Artificial Friend, eine künstliche Intelligenz, die dafür entwickelt wurde, Jugendlichen eine Gefährtin zu sein auf dem Weg ins Erwachsenwerden. Von ihrem Platz im Schaufenster eines Spielzeuggeschäfts aus beobachtet sie ganz genau, was draussen vor sich geht, studiert das Verhalten der Kundinnen und Kunden und hofft darauf, bald von einem jungen Menschen als neue Freundin ausgewählt zu werden. Als sich ihr Wunsch endlich erfüllt und ein Mädchen sie mit nach Hause nimmt, muss sie jedoch bald feststellen, dass sie auf die Versprechen von Menschen nicht allzu viel geben sollte.Ishiguro zeigt die Abgründe unserer Gesellschaft durch die Augen einer künstlichen Itelligenz

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Durchschnitt: (3.9)
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