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Sargassomeer (1966)

von Jean Rhys

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
7,309211954 (3.56)723
The fortieth anniversary reissue of the best-selling "tour de force" (Walter Allen, New York Times Book Review).
Kürzlich hinzugefügt vonjenniferw88, Linda63-, Hillside_Library, LizMo, Rebreitz, VivienneR, Joanna65, adaorhell, jade3396, private Bibliothek
NachlassbibliothekenGraham Greene
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    Jane Eyre von Charlotte Brontë (aces)
  2. 71
    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination von Sandra M. Gilbert (Imprinted)
  3. 20
    Die Glasglocke von Sylvia Plath (Philosofiction)
  4. 20
    Nahe dem wilden Herzen von Clarice Lispector (Petroglyph)
    Petroglyph: Even though Near to the wild heart was written some twenty years prior to Wide Sargasso Sea, these two share numerous features: the interior monologue, the lyricism, the heroine mostly living inside her skull, the central character who doesn’t see a way out of their mental frustrations with life. Lispector kicked all that up a few notches, but to me these two belong close together on my mental shelves.… (mehr)
  5. 20
    Grendel von John Gardner (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Classics retold to give voice to silent characters important to their plots.
  6. 32
    MARCH(Paperback) BY [Author]Brooks, Geraldine ( Feb-2006 ) von Geraldine Brooks (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Classic stories (Little Women/Jane Eyre) re-imagined through the experiences of characters who are important to the plot while being almost entirely unseen.
  7. 10
    After Mrs Rochester von Polly Teale (srdr)
    srdr: This brilliant drama illuminates the themes that run through Jean Rhys's life, Wide Sargasso Sea, and Jane Eyre.
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  9. 00
    Reise ans Ende der Nacht von Louis-Ferdinand Céline (Cecilturtle)
    Cecilturtle: colonialisme
  10. 22
    Tell My Horse: Voodoo and Life in Haiti and Jamaica von Zora Neale Hurston (cammykitty)
  11. 01
    Die schwarze Fahne von Victor Hugo (Medicinos)
    Medicinos: Bug-Jargal décrit une société antillaise basée sur l'exploitation des esclaves qui éclate lorsque ces derniers se rebellent. La prisonnière des Sargasses décrit une société analogue après la rébellion.
  12. 01
    Blessed Is the Fruit: A Novel von Robert Antoni (IsolaBlue)
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    Unter dem Vulkan von Malcolm Lowry (GlebtheDancer)
    GlebtheDancer: Dark, foreboding, claustrophobic feel. Self-destruction of central character. Similar prose styles.
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    Signed, Mata Hari: A Novel von Yannick Murphy (Anonymer Nutzer)
    Anonymer Nutzer: Lush depiction of tropics with natives playing important roles, women "bought" and tragic endings
1960s (17)
Oceans (3)
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So…I’m not sure what to make of this work. One star? Five stars? The idea of writing about Jane Eyre’s Bertha is brilliant…the execution of that here is…mixed. (Edit: my thoughts have evolved - see update below)

As I read, I tried approaching the work as a part of Jane Eyre but also as a stand alone novel. As a stand alone, it was certainly edifying as to Caribbean culture, history, racial strife, and more. I’m glad I had the Norton Critical Edition chock full of footnotes.

As a prequel to Jane Eyre, well, at best, mixed results. Much ink has been spilled over this aspect of the work and I’m not sure I can add anything erudite to those conversations. I had a hard time seeing this Rochester (wait..is it really Rochester? He’s never named in this book) as the same Rochester in Jane Eyre. His interactions with others here are nothing like his interactions with others in Jane Eyre.

And having read now much about Rhys, her life, and earlier works I am willing to accept that Antoinette is partly a disguised autobiography (and then maybe some wishful thinking). Even among fellow writers on the continent she seemed an outsider among outsiders.

Update: I found Sandra Drake’s critical essay Race and Caribbean Culture as Themes of Liberation in Jean Rhys’ WSS (excerpted from All That Foolishness/That All Foolishness ) that “true organizational harmony occurs on the level of Antoinette’s psyche” worked out “in one dream dreamed three times” (“Qui est la?” {Who’s there?} And “Are you frightened?”) to be the best and most insightful of the critical essays I’d read on WSS. She explores the Caribbean culture, specifically obeah and zombies; but more critically spends time exploring the relationships Antoinette has with Cristophine, Sandi (importantly), and last but not least Tia. I think these relationships are the heart of the novel and that other reviews spend more effort looking at Jane Eyre rather than these. And it’s these relationships that provide the basis for WSS to be a stand alone work independent of Jane Eyre. But then they also provide interesting insights to Bertha/Antoinette’s actions at Thornfield Hall

Further update: so the thought popped into my head that maybe Rhys backed into tying WSS to Jane Eyre. That given what some have put forward as Antoinette being autobiographical, my thought was Rhys had book ended her original story with the two fires, then realized she could tie her tale into Jane Eyre. Maybe explains not naming Rochester in WSS. And the Antoinette/Bertha names. (But I seem to recall reading somewhere that Rhys had stated she had read Jane Eyre shortly after she’d relocated to England and she did not like the way Bertha had been represented in Austen’s book.)

And the writing: captivating descriptive passages. Really captured the islands. And I like how in addition to colors, she includes scents (not odors, but nice stuff that adds to the depth of her descriptions) numerous times; not enough authors do this. Not sure what to make of “Rochester” and Antoinette describing things too similarly- is this a tie between them? Or just lazy writing?

My biggest gripe is the incoherent writing and not knowing at multiple times who was speaking. Maybe an attempt at stream of consciousness, but if so, it fell short. ( )
  jimgosailing | Nov 18, 2021 |
Beautiful language, and the story I really wanted to know about from Jane Eyre. ( )
  Zoes_Human | Nov 12, 2021 |
My video review can be found here: https://youtu.be/1r3J7I86mUs
  tarantula7 | Nov 2, 2021 |
I found this book very engaging, almost hypnotic. The characters were fascinating. I did begin to get confused in Section 2-- who is speaking? what is happening? I felt almost like I was in a dream state, descending into madness along with Antoinette.

After reading I realized this is a prequel to Jane Eyre, which I have yet to read, but now will. ( )
  technodiabla | Oct 24, 2021 |
I suppose this is to be more a review of criticism—I liked; I didn’t like—than inspiration, despite the shimmer of the language.

I guess I was less curious about Rochester—the Jane-Antoinette contrast is more interesting—and I hated Antoinette, especially in the beginning. She was selfish about the race situation (boo hoo Me), and selfish about the Church (boo hoo Me), so a typical selfish lover. Then again, most people are selfish, and you’re supposed to love everybody, not almost nobody. Maybe I just need to listen to “The Last Time I Saw Richard” again….

But I liked “Jane Eyre” and I thought it was good about gender and that Jane was free, and that there was plenty enough in the older and more Christian book about religion gone wrong, so I can take (as perspective) or leave the whole God as excessively pious and romance as a loser’s cynical game, you know. Actually it is rather an anti-Jane Eyre, more social fiction than romantic drama. That is not necessarily a point against it, especially since Jane is a little parochial English girl who thinks that Ireland is Far Away, etc. But Sargasso’s treatment of British Caribbean race relations—I don’t like to call things names, but it’s problematic. Slavery had only just been abolished and it would be another century before independence, but although there are Black characters, which parochial English Jane knew nothing of—hip hip hooray, Black characters—they seem to be evaluated mainly in terms of whether or not they fit into the whole white fear narrative thing…. Don’t burn down my mansion, Negro! Don’t murder my infant son! (Poor infant son!) And if you’re going to sing one of those slavery songs, don’t sing it so that anybody knows what the words are, right.

I don’t know. It’s not exactly justifying the racism, so maybe some people like it better than me. Maybe some people think it felicitous to have Black and English interact at all, in any non-explicitly racist interaction. I suppose there is *some* ground in the novel for discussing white racism. But maybe the Modernist discussion of racism isn’t as well developed or skillful as the discussion of gender and gender freedom was, even a hundred years before.

…. I liked some of the Antoinette-Christophine interaction, and the legal malus of marriage, but in some ways it was too anti-Jane Eyre; I think this way sometimes myself, but it’s easy to make a Perfect Evil Man, in this case a Rochester supervillain complete with tights and mustache…. It’s too romantic. It could be a comment on that I guess, but I like “The Last Time I Saw Richard” better.
  goosecap | Sep 21, 2021 |

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (22 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Rhys, JeanHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Ashworth, AndreaEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Daunt, ChrisIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Dorsman-Vos, W.A.ÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Mooney, BelEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Smith, AngelaHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Wyndham, FrancisEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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The fortieth anniversary reissue of the best-selling "tour de force" (Walter Allen, New York Times Book Review).

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

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Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.56)
0.5 6
1 43
1.5 10
2 167
2.5 48
3 421
3.5 126
4 554
4.5 64
5 277

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