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Frau am Abgrund der Zeit (1976)

von Marge Piercy

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
2,285465,278 (3.91)1 / 154
Hailed as a classic of speculative fiction, Marge Piercy's landmark novel is a transformative vision of two futures--and what it takes to will one or the other into reality. Harrowing and prescient, Woman on the Edge of Time speaks to a new generation on whom these choices weigh more heavily than ever before.   Connie Ramos is a Mexican American woman living on the streets of New York. Once ambitious and proud, she has lost her child, her husband, her dignity--and now they want to take her sanity. After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a time of sexual and racial equality, environmental purity, and unprecedented self-actualization. But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow.   Praise for Woman on the Edge of Time   "This is one of those rare novels that leave us different people at the end than we were at the beginning. Whether you are reading Marge Piercy's great work again or for the first time, it will remind you that we are creating the future with every choice we make."--Gloria Steinem   "An ambitious, unusual novel about the possibilities for moral courage in contemporary society."--The Philadelphia Inquirer   "A stunning, even astonishing novel . . . marvelous and compelling."--Publishers Weekly   "Connie Ramos's world is cuttingly real."--Newsweek   "Absorbing and exciting."--The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.… (mehr)
  1. 50
    Planet der Frauen von Joanna Russ (psybre)
    psybre: for similar social- and gender issues explored
  2. 40
    The Gate to Women's Country von Sheri S. Tepper (owen1218)
  3. 10
    Vom gleichen Blut von Octavia E. Butler (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both novels use time travel to explore issues of race and inequality
  4. 10
    Herland von Charlotte Perkins Gilman (sturlington)
  5. 00
    Always Coming Home von Ursula K. Le Guin (sturlington)
    sturlington: The feminist utopias seem similar.
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This is one of those books that I didn't necessarily read because I was enjoying it, but because it's an important contribution to its genre.

The book is about Connie, a Latina in New York City. She lives alone (she has been twice widowed, and her daughter has been taken away by Child Protection Services). She has a beloved niece, and she gets in an argument with her niece's pimp and hits him in the face with a glass bottle. For that, she is unjustly put in a horrible mental institution where she is kept on heavy sedatives and subjected to medical experiments.

While all of this is going on in her daily life, she is visited by Luciente, a woman from the future. Connie learns that her empathy and ability to connect with people gives her the ability to time travel. She frequently travels to the future to learn about Luciente's world, which is an anti-capitalist, eco-feminist utopia.

I found Connie's time traveling to be rather tedious. There isn't much of a storyline to most of it: for the most part, Luciente shows Connie around, and Connie asks a lot of bombastic questions about what she is seeing, and seems very resistant to most of the changes in the future. This often devolves into a kind of contrived dialectic dialog where it is clear that the only reason for the dialog is to give the characters a chance to describe their society in detail. For the middle half of the book, there is very little action, just a lot of descriptions of this future utopia. It felt like Pierce just wanted to describe her idea of a perfect world and invented a flimsy frame story so that she could talk about every aspect of the world: polyamory, gender fluidity, education, conflict resolution, genetic engineering, holidays and celebrations, food preparation, etc.

However, it gradually becomes clear that all is night right in the utopia: Luciente mentions that the reason they are bringing Connie to the future is so that she can influence the events of the past to make sure that this future happens. As Connie's life becomes more troubled, the future becomes less utopian, and Connie feels a stonger imperative to prevent the doctors at the mental hospital from experimenting on her so that she can save the future.

When she is not traveling to the future, Connie's storyline is a scathing indictment of the unjust treatment of the poor and mentally-ill. This can make for some very traumatic reading at times.

The book has a twist ending, which I won't give away... but I will say that when I first read the ending, I found it very disappointing, but the more I have thought about the book, the more the ending totally changes the rest of the book, to the point that I am almost tempted to read it again.

What makes this book remarkable is how much it is ahead of its time, especially for science fiction. This feels like the kind of science fiction that would be written now and would make the Sad Puppies angry than the kind of book that was written 45 years ago. ( )
  Gwendydd | Dec 31, 2021 |
Though this novel has more company in making some of its points it still has plenty to say about the complicity of the powerful in the seemingly individual tragedies of the disadvantaged. Connie started her life believing in her own future but at every set back she is not supported but blamed and must go on with fewer resources. Whether it is her ability or her position in the context of the future her connection with a future community becomes her last support. I found the justifications and consequences of her final actions to embody more past to modern notions than modern to future ones. ( )
  quondame | Nov 16, 2021 |
Love it. Difficult to read, emotionally, due to grim and terrible reality of disadvantaged protagonist--woman of color unjustly locked into a mental institution.

Mattapoisett is a brilliant utopian gem, eco-feminist, and I see echoes of this vision in a lot of modern SF with utopian threads.

Classic SF notes here:
http://positronchicago.blogspot.com/2015/08/classic-sci-fi-woman-on-edge-of-time... ( )
  jakecasella | Sep 21, 2020 |
Woman unfairly committed to mental hospital contacted by woman from eutopian future
  JohnLavik | Mar 29, 2020 |
I only read this book, and then only partially was to see how the location of this story, or rather the town in the future was a similar town to the one I spent my high school years, namely Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. So, I skipped 7 chapters and landed on chapter 8 where Mattapoisett figures prominently. When she mentioned the Grange, I knew she got it right. When I lived there (1960-64) the population was 3,000, and now it is 6,000. It's a suburb of New Bedford, but off the beaten path. It still has two churches, Congregational and Catholic. And 34 elective offices, including the Herring Weir Inspector. ( )
  vpfluke | Mar 27, 2020 |
It is the most serious and fully imagined Utopia since Ursula K. LeGuin's The Dispossessed, and even the cynical reader will leave it refreshed and rallied--as Piercy intended.
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Marge PiercyHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Leifhold, ChristianUmschlaggestalterCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Mahon, PhyllisUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Petersen, Arne HerløvÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Connie got up from her kitchen table and walked slowly to the door.
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I see the original division of labor, that first dichotomy, as enabling later divvies into haves and have-nots, powerful and powerless, enjoyers and workers, rapists and victims. The patriarchal mind/body split turned the body to machine and the rest of the universe into booty on which the will could run rampant, using, discarding, destroying.
I must serve the talent that uses me, the energy that flows through me, but I mustn't make others serve me.
We are not three women, Connie thought. We are ups and downs and heavy tranks meeting in the all-electric kitchen and bouncing off each other's opaque sides like shiny pills colliding.
I was not born and raised to fight battles, but to be modest and gentle and still. Only one person to love. Just one little corner of loving of my own. For that love I'd have borne it all and I'd never have fought back. I would have obeyed. I would have agreed that I'm sick, that I'm sick to be poor and sick to be sick and sick to be hungry and sick to be lonely and sick to be robbed and used. But you were so greedy, so cruel! One of them, just one, you could have left me! But I have nothing. Why shouldn't I strike back?
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Wikipedia auf Englisch (2)

Hailed as a classic of speculative fiction, Marge Piercy's landmark novel is a transformative vision of two futures--and what it takes to will one or the other into reality. Harrowing and prescient, Woman on the Edge of Time speaks to a new generation on whom these choices weigh more heavily than ever before.   Connie Ramos is a Mexican American woman living on the streets of New York. Once ambitious and proud, she has lost her child, her husband, her dignity--and now they want to take her sanity. After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a time of sexual and racial equality, environmental purity, and unprecedented self-actualization. But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow.   Praise for Woman on the Edge of Time   "This is one of those rare novels that leave us different people at the end than we were at the beginning. Whether you are reading Marge Piercy's great work again or for the first time, it will remind you that we are creating the future with every choice we make."--Gloria Steinem   "An ambitious, unusual novel about the possibilities for moral courage in contemporary society."--The Philadelphia Inquirer   "A stunning, even astonishing novel . . . marvelous and compelling."--Publishers Weekly   "Connie Ramos's world is cuttingly real."--Newsweek   "Absorbing and exciting."--The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.

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