StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Der Glöckner von Notre-Dame (1831)

von Victor Hugo

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
12,606167406 (3.93)385
Der Gl ckner von Notre-Dame (auch: Notre-Dame von Paris, Originaltitel: Notre-Dame de Paris) ist ein 1831 erschienener historischer Roman des franz sischen Schriftstellers Victor Hugo (1802-1885). Im Mittelpunkt steht die aufw ndig geschilderte Kathedrale Notre-Dame de Paris. In ihr spielen die wichtigsten Teile der Romanhandlung, vor allem das Geschehen um die Gestalt des Quasimodo, des Gl ckners von Notre-Dame. Der Roman beinhaltet mehrere Handlungsstr nge, die nach und nach ineinanderflie en und ein buntes und vielseitiges Bild des franz sischen Sp tmittelalters mit all seinen Bev lkerungsschichten zeichnen. Die Geschichte vom missgestalteten Gl ckner Quasimodo, der sich in die sch ne Zigeunerin Esmeralda verliebt, ist - obgleich sie meist als interessant genug angesehen wurde, um ihn zur Haupthandlung einer Vielzahl von Verfilmungen zu machen - nur einer dieser Str nge. Der deutsche Titel des Romans Der Gl ckner von Notre-Dame ist somit etwas fehlgeleitet, denn der franz sische Originaltitel lautet allgemeiner Notre-Dame de Paris.… (mehr)
Europe (88)
1830s (1)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

We know The Hunchback of Notre-Dame is Victor Hugo's classic masterpiece for a reason, but it did take me a while to understand why. It starts slowly, with several treatises embedded in the text. Hugo is particularly inflamed by the failure to maintain the Medieval architectural structures of France. In this regard, the Cathedral is itself a major character in his novel.

As for the story, it is a romantic tale of love, abuse of power, political and religious corruption, the moral state of humanity, the injustice of justice, the futility of love, the inability of man to see beyond the surface and love for what is beneath, and the fleeting effects of beauty on life. The only character who truly loves is the misshapen Quasimodo, who loves Esmeralda more than self. Because he has been conditioned to think himself beyond being loved by anyone, he takes all of his affections and heaps them upon the object of his desires without any expectation of any return.

Frollo the Archdeacon is a malevolent character, but this is tempered by what we know about him prior to his falling for Esmerelda's charms. It is he who has saved Quasimodo when no one else would have even considered doing so, and he has raised and cared for his worthless brother past all duty and obligation. At the same time, he is the poster child for those who lament "if I can't have you, no one can." To the bitter end, I hoped that his better nature would win out, but even in the face of knowing his soul was at stake, he persisted in feeding his evil character.

By its conclusion, the story has become a tragedy of great proportions. I was reminded of the final lines of Romeo and Juliet in which the Prince laments "all are punished." Goodness does not win any quarter for Esmeralda, who dies piteously and the only kindness given her mother is that she expires before she can see her daughter hanged. Both Frollos get what is coming to them and Quasimodo suffers the fate he chooses in the absence of saving his love. Only Djali can be said to have a happy end, Gringoire will doubtless make him a fine master.

Had someone asked me if I knew this story, I would have said "yes". I would have been wrong. I had many misconceptions about both the plot and the themes Hugo addressed. It is apparent why this story has survived time and still has impact and meaning for a modern audience: Love is often still unrequited for the wrong reasons; we still fail to see the quality in someone who presents an ugly face and make too much of those who are only pleasing outwardly; there is still great political corruption that feeds the pockets of those at the top and cares nothing for the everyday man; mobs still whip themselves into fury and reap havoc upon the wrong objects; and injustice can be found in every community and every system.

( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
DNF Just too terrible to finish. ( )
  Hamptot71 | Jul 18, 2022 |
The eternal tale of Quasimodo, a deformed orphan raised by the Archdeacon of Notre-Dame and employed as the church's bellringer rendering him deaf. In spite of his ugliness, he retains a childlike curiosity and falls in love with the gypsy Esmeralda who herself is infatuated with the vain Captain Phoebus. The ultimate crescendo is delivered by Hugo when tragedy overtakes the life of all three with the main lesson being: nothing in life is immortal other than life's lessons. ( )
  Amarj33t_5ingh | Jul 8, 2022 |
8489715548
  archivomorero | Jun 27, 2022 |
I'm not sure I'll be able to write a traditional book review for this one, and in fact I'm not even sure where to begin. The single strongest recurring thought while reading this book was, "Why/how on earth would this have been made into a children's film?" I haven't seen the 1996 Disney production myself, but it seems pretty safe to say that it must be so heavily adapted as to be virtually unrecognizable.

The overall plot could be summarized as, "There are a handful of Parisian men who lust after a Romani ("gypsy" in the book) girl, whose life begins and ends in tragedy." Claude Frollo, Archdeacon of Notre Dame, twenty years ago took in a deformed foundling. The foundling, Quasimodo, who has grown up in the cathedral and is now the bell-ringer, is coerced by Frollo to undertake a kidnapping. Sixteen-year-old Esmeralda and her beautiful goat Djali are rescued from said attempt by Captain Phoebus, and she instantly but unwisely falls in love with him. Pierre Gringoire, a struggling playwright, becomes entangled with a street gang and is nearly hanged, but Esmeralda secures his freedom by agreeing to marry him for a period of four years. And then there is Paquette, whose infant daughter was stolen from her bed years ago, and who now lives as an anchorite, walled up in a cell along a street in Paris and raving daily about the gypsies who took her daughter.

I was a good 40% through the book before anything interesting began to happen, thus at more than 450 pages it was a bit of a slog. All told, I'm not entirely disappointed to have read it, if only to have added some new knowledge to my brain with respect to literary history. Would not recommend to a friend. ( )
  ryner | May 20, 2022 |
Au point de sembler plus vraie que la vraie. Bref, un roman-cathédrale.
hinzugefügt von Ariane65 | bearbeitenLire (Mar 1, 2002)
 
In Notre-Dame de Paris Hugo’s dreams are magnified in outline, microscopic in detail. They are true but are made magical by the enlargement of pictorial close-up, not by grandiloquent fading. Compare the treatment of the theme of the love that survives death in this book, with the not dissimilar theme in Wuthering Heights. Catherine and Heathcliff are eternal as the wretched wind that whines at the northern casement. They are impalpable and bound in their eternal pursuit. A more terrible and more precise fate is given by Hugo to Quasimodo after death. The hunchback’s skeleton is found clasping the skeleton of the gypsy girl in the charnel house. We see it with our eyes. And his skeleton falls into dust when it is touched, in that marvellous last line of the novel. Where love is lost, it is lost even beyond the grave...

The black and white view is relieved by the courage of the priest’s feckless brother and the scepticism of Gringoire, the whole is made workable by poetic and pictorial instinct. It has often been pointed out that Hugo had the eye that sees for itself. Where Balzac described things out of descriptive gluttony, so that parts of his novels are an undiscriminating buyer’s catalogue; where Scott describes out of antiquarian zeal, Hugo brings things to life by implicating them with persons in the action in rapid ‘takes’. In this sense, Notre-Dame de Paris was the perfect film script. Every stone plays its part.
hinzugefügt von SnootyBaronet | bearbeitenObserver, V.S. Pritchett
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (478 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Hugo, VictorAutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Aken, Jan vanNachwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Alger, Abby LangdonÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Antal, LászlóÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Bair, LowellÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Beckwith, James CarrollÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Blake, QuentinIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Bo, CarloEinführungCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Boor, GerdiÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
BrugueraHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Cobb, Walter J.ÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Dixon, Arthur A.IllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Gohin, YvesHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hill, JamesUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Keiler, WalterÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Kool, Halbo C.ÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Krailsheimer, AlbanÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
La Farge, PhyllisÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Laverdel, MarcelIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Liu, CatherineÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Lusignoli, ClaraÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Maurois, AndréNachwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Oorthuizen, WillemÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Panattoni, SergioÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Rhys, ErnestEveryman's Library EditorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Seebacher, JacquesHerausgeberCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Spitzers, AttieÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stedum, Gerda vanÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Sturrock, JohnÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Swinburne, A. C.AppreciationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Terpstra, BasÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Verhagen, InekeIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Vincet, ArthurErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
וולק, ארזÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

Ist enthalten in

Beinhaltet

Bearbeitet/umgesetzt in

Ist gekürzt in

Inspiriert

Hat als Erläuterung für Schüler oder Studenten

Hat einen Lehrerleitfaden

Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Am Morgen des 6. Januar 1482 erwachten die Pariser beim Lärm aller Glocken, die im dreifachen Bereiche der Altstadt, der Universität und der Südstadt sämtlich und laut erklangen.
Es sind heute gerade 348 Jahre, 6 Monate und 19 Tage, dass die Pariser durch das Geläut aller Glocken erwachten, welche in dem dreifachen Umkreise der Cité, des Universitätsviertels und der Stadt laut ertönten.
(Übersetzung von Eugenie Walter)
Es sind dreihundertachtundvierzig Jahre, sechs Monate und neunzehn Tage, seitdem die Pariser beim Geläut aller Glocken der Altstadt, Universität und Neustadt erwachten.
(Übersetzung von Walter Keiler)
Zitate
Endlich neigte sich der geschworene Buchhändler der Universität, Meister Andry Musnier, zum Ohre des Kürschners der Kleider des Königs mit den Worten:

"Ich sage euch, Herr, das Ende der Welt ist nahe. Man sah nie solche Ausgelassenheit der Studenten. Die verfluchten Erfindungen des Jahrhunderts richten alles zugrunde, die Kanonen, Serpentinen, Bombarden und vor allem die Buchdruckerkunst, diese andere Pest aus Deutschland. Keine Manuskripte! Keine Bücher! Der Druck tötet den Buchhandel! Das Ende der Welt ist nah."
Stets dachte ich, werde es von mir abhängen, den Prozeß zu verfolgen oder fallen zu lassen. Doch jeder böse Gedanke ist unerbittlich und bestrebt, zur Tatsache zu werden; und da, wo ich mich allmächtig glaube, ist das Verhängnis mächtiger als ich. Ach, ach, das Verhängnis ergriff dich, überlieferte dich den furchtbaren Rädern der Maschine, die ich im Dunkel baute. Jetzt bin ich dem Ende nahe. (Claude Frollo)
Die Liebe gleicht einem Baum; sie sproßt von selbst hervor, treibt tiefe Wurzeln in unser Sein und grünt oft noch auf einem gebrochenen Herzen.
Dom Claude begann aufs neue: "Ihr seid also glücklich?" - Gringoire erwiderte mit Feuer: "Auf Ehre, ja! Zuerst liebte ich Frauen, dann Tiere; jetzt liebe ich Steine. Sie sind ebenso unterhaltend wie Tiere und Frauen, aber nicht so treulos."
Der Priester legte die Hand auf die Stirn. Es war seine gewöhnliche Bewegung; dann sprach er: "Wahrhaftig, Ihr habt recht!"
Peter Gringoire war so glücklich, die Ziege zu retten, und erlangte auch einigen Beifall im Tragödien-Dichten. Nachdem er, wie es scheint, alle Torheiten gekostet hatte, die Astrologie, Alchimie, Philosophie und Architektur, kehrte er zur albernsten Torheit, der Tragödie zurück; das nannte er: Ein tragisches Ende nehmen.

Auch Phoebus von Chateaupers nahm ein tragisches Ende: Er verheiratete sich.
Letzte Worte
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

Der Gl ckner von Notre-Dame (auch: Notre-Dame von Paris, Originaltitel: Notre-Dame de Paris) ist ein 1831 erschienener historischer Roman des franz sischen Schriftstellers Victor Hugo (1802-1885). Im Mittelpunkt steht die aufw ndig geschilderte Kathedrale Notre-Dame de Paris. In ihr spielen die wichtigsten Teile der Romanhandlung, vor allem das Geschehen um die Gestalt des Quasimodo, des Gl ckners von Notre-Dame. Der Roman beinhaltet mehrere Handlungsstr nge, die nach und nach ineinanderflie en und ein buntes und vielseitiges Bild des franz sischen Sp tmittelalters mit all seinen Bev lkerungsschichten zeichnen. Die Geschichte vom missgestalteten Gl ckner Quasimodo, der sich in die sch ne Zigeunerin Esmeralda verliebt, ist - obgleich sie meist als interessant genug angesehen wurde, um ihn zur Haupthandlung einer Vielzahl von Verfilmungen zu machen - nur einer dieser Str nge. Der deutsche Titel des Romans Der Gl ckner von Notre-Dame ist somit etwas fehlgeleitet, denn der franz sische Originaltitel lautet allgemeiner Notre-Dame de Paris.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.93)
0.5 3
1 22
1.5 6
2 87
2.5 15
3 350
3.5 81
4 609
4.5 90
5 511

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

Penguin Australia

2 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Penguin Australia veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 0140443533, 0451531515

Tantor Media

2 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Tantor Media veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 1400102111, 1400109035

Recorded Books

Eine Ausgabe dieses Buches wurde Recorded Books herausgegeben.

» Verlagsinformations-Seite

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 173,629,277 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar