StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance: Portrait… (1992)

von William Manchester

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
2,858613,726 (3.59)1 / 74
From tales of chivalrous knights to the barbarity of trial by ordeal, no era has been a greater source of awe, horror, and wonder than the Middle Ages. In handsomely crafted prose and with the grace and authority of his extraordinary gift for narrative history, William Manchester leads us from a civilization tottering on the brink of collapse to the grandeur of its rebirth, the Renaissance, a dense explosion of energy that spawned some of history's greatest poets, philosophers, and painters, as well as some of its most spectacular villains.… (mehr)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Manchester's excellent work endeavors to make a modern reader understand the medieval person, the world they lived in, their psychology, their daily life, their fears and concerns. He expertly details the differences between our modern world and theirs by doing a case study of a couple of specific periods, then moving the work into the Italian Renaissance to show the reader how incredibly shocking everything that happened in the 'exploration age' was.

He devotes the last third of his book to his fascination with Ferdinand Magellan, which wasn't exactly what I wanted, but it was still insightful, interesting, and educational. You could do fine not reading that section if you wanted a shorter read more specific to the medieval period, since the sheer length and detail of his Magellan section makes the rest of the book feel oddly like his long, detailed prologue intended to set the stage for how interesting he finds this one historical character.... who is not a likable character at all. I'm sorry, Manchester, I'm just not into conquistadors. ( )
  RNCoble | Mar 25, 2021 |
This is a pretty good book, but at best it's a distillation of portions of Arial (and William) Durants multi-volume work "The History of Civilization".

Dated stuff -- but still, good. I especially liked the stuff on the Borgia popes. ( )
  wickenden | Mar 8, 2021 |
My initial foray into William Manchester's writings (he apparently authored 17 books prior to this one) was the unfortunately titled A World Lit Only by Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance: Portrait of an Age. Many of the books I read are found in the bibliographies of other books, but I believe I stumbled upon this one on Amazon and, like a candy bar at the drug store, it became an impulse purchase. I have an interest in medieval European history, as well as intellectual history more broadly, and the title sounded promising.

The title itself comes from a quote on page 199: "In that age the world was still lit only by fire." That literal fact held much in terms of metaphorical promise. But strangely, as Manchester states outright in a preliminary "Author's Note" (which some readers may skip), the book itself began as an introduction to a friend's biography of Magellan, and Manchester wanted to provide some context, in a dozen pages or so. Of course there is no mention of this in the title, and if one doesn't read the Author's Note beforehand, one is riding along with an interesting overview of the medieval period until the subject turns to Magellan. The final chapter ("One Man Alone") is devoted to Magellan's search for a route to the Spice Islands, through the straits that now bear his name, ending in the Philippines.

It is all very interesting, though a bit disjointed. The book's cover says "National Bestseller," and that may indeed have been so (it was first published in 1992). But this book could have been so much better--at the very least hung with a more apropos title. To be fair, Manchester asserts that his book is "a slight work, with no scholarly pretensions" (xiii). With that pretext in mind, the book is an enjoyable enough read; hence four stars, with the rating buttressed by the necessarily read Author's Note. A succinct chronology and solid bibliography provide bookends for the text. ( )
  RAD66 | Nov 12, 2020 |
Interesting but disappointing. Although, the Medieval Mind is an excellent portend for the 1632 series. Great quote from the Magellan section; "His character was, of course, imperfect. But heroes need not be admirable, and indeed most have not been. The web of driving traits behind their accomplishments almost assures that. Men who do the remarkable — heroic and otherwise — frequently fail in their personal relationships. This unpleasant reality is usually glossed over in burnishing the image of the great.” Compliments of bread2u. ( )
  jamespurcell | Aug 15, 2020 |
This book was very different than expected based on the title.

I expected to find:
* Candles were expensive
* Tallow, vs paraffin vs other kinds of wax
* Oil lamps vs candles
* Who could afford artificial light and and who couldn’t
* How much artificial light was used
* What was used instead of artificial light
* How we got away from artificial light
* What life was like when artificial light was expensive.

The only one one that I found any hint of an answer to was the last one, and that only within the first 28 pages.

What I did find — not much, there were only three entries in the Table of Contents
* The Medieval Mind p. 1-28
* The Shattering: p. 29-220
* One Man Alone p. 221-292


The Medieval Mind section/chapter covered what a miserable short life the commoners lived.

The Shattering section/chapter described at length the debauchery of the church and royalty. After a dozen pages I got the point that at the highest levels sexual immorality and killing of opponents were rampant. It continued along that same line until finally getting to Luther and other reformers who although not sexually promiscuous, often preferred to kill their opponents. It goes on and on, but it’s the same story of self-centeredness and intolerance repeated over and over.

The last section is about Ferdinand Magellan and is probably the most interesting section. It concludes with some cogent comments about heroes and heroism. Here is a little bit. The conclusion was intriguing.

“Similarly, the soldier who throws himself on a live grenade, surrendering his life to save his comrades, may be aware the medal of honor. Nevertheless, his deed, bering impulsive is actually unheroic ... Heroism is the exact opposite — always deliberate, never mindless.” (Page 287)

“… it is difficult to find another figure whose heroism matches Magellan’s” (Page 288-289)
* Inviting charges of treason
* Unseaworthy ships
* Attempted sabotage against his expedition
* His hodgepodge crews couldn’t even communicate in the same tongue
* The background of the captains assigned to him almost guaranteed mutiny and treachery, which indeed followed
* Unable to confide in anyone else
* He persevered in his search for the strait
* It was his fortitude, his inflexible will which fueled morale and stamina
* His discovery of the Philippines dwarfed his original goal

“His character was, of course, imperfect. But heroes need not be admirable, and indeed most have not been. The web of driving traits behind their accomplishments almost assures that. Men who do the remarkable — heroic and otherwise — frequently fail in their personal relationships. This unpleasant reality is usually glossed over in burnishing the image of the great.” (Page 289)
( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
"This is an infuriating book. The present reviewer hoped that it would simply fade away, as its intellectual qualities (too strong a word) deserved.... Manchester makes it clear in the early pages of this Portrait that he had never thought much about the Middle Ages.... Fair enough... But when this mind-set unfolds itself through some of the most gratuitous errors of fact and eccentricities of judgment this reviewer has read (or heard) in quite some time, one must protest."
hinzugefügt von Taphophile13 | bearbeitenSpeculum, Jeremy DuQuesnay Adams (bezahlte Seite) (Jan 1, 1995)
 
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Eine Kugel kam geflogen: Gilt es mire oder gilt es dir? Ihn hat es weggerissen; Er liegt mir vor den Fussen Als wars ein Stuck von mir.
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To Tim Joyner - Athlete - Comrade - Scholar - Friend
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
The densest of the medieval centuries—the six hundred years between, roughly, A.D. 400 and A.D. 1000—are still widely known as the Dark Ages.
Zitate
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Heroism is always deliberate, never mindless. (Page 287)
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

From tales of chivalrous knights to the barbarity of trial by ordeal, no era has been a greater source of awe, horror, and wonder than the Middle Ages. In handsomely crafted prose and with the grace and authority of his extraordinary gift for narrative history, William Manchester leads us from a civilization tottering on the brink of collapse to the grandeur of its rebirth, the Renaissance, a dense explosion of energy that spawned some of history's greatest poets, philosophers, and painters, as well as some of its most spectacular villains.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.59)
0.5 15
1 18
1.5 2
2 32
2.5 7
3 92
3.5 27
4 163
4.5 10
5 98

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

Hachette Book Group

2 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Hachette Book Group veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 0316545562, 0316545317

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 163,273,992 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar