StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Hast du schon SantaThing angesehen, LibraryThings Geschenkaktionstradition?
ausblenden
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Snow White, Blood Red von Ellen Datlow
Lädt ...

Snow White, Blood Red (Original 2019; 1993. Auflage)

von Ellen Datlow (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,602168,539 (3.79)50
"You hold in your hands a volume of wonders - magical tales of trolls and ogres, of bewitched princesses and kingdoms accursed, penned by some of the most acclaimed fantasists of our day. But these are not bedtime stories designed to usher an innocent child gently into the realm of dreams. These are stories that bite - lush and erotic, often dark and disturbing mystical journeys through a phantasmagoric landscape of distinctly adult sensibilities." "Set in haunted forests, amid the recognizable urban sprawl of contemporary society, or in worlds beyond our imagining, here are the lusts, dreams and nightmares of the human animal - presented in a manner that would make the Grimm brothers proud. From provocative alternate takes on time-honored myths - Tanith Lee's sensuous and unsettling futuristic retelling of Snow White; Gahan Wilson's delightful account of the Frog Prince in therapy - to stunningly original new tales rich in archetypal imagery - Steve Rasnic Tem's deliciously gruesome chronicle of a miniature child abandoned in a city of giants. Each is a compelling grown-up fable relevant to the times in which we live." "Through the collective creative genius of such masters as Charles de Lint, Nancy Kress, Jane Yolen and many others, the magical characters we loved in childhood have been reborn. But Jack is older, though no wiser now...and he has climbed the beanstalk one time too many. Rapunzel's sweet innocence has vanished like a song on the wind. And there is no such thing as "happily ever after.""--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (mehr)
Mitglied:lewbryson
Titel:Snow White, Blood Red
Autoren:Ellen Datlow (Autor)
Info:Eos (1993), 432 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Informationen

Snow White, Blood Red von Ellen Datlow (Editor) (2019)

Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

It took a little time for me to warm up to this one--almost half the book, really. A lot of the first stories just felt like rote retellings, without an interesting twist or resetting. But once I hit "The Princess in the Tower," things picked up and I found I enjoyed a greater proportion of the stories. These were the ones I enjoyed:

Snow-Drop, by Tanith Lee
A near-future sci-fi take on “Snow White” from the perspective of the stepmother, in this case the wife of an absent business man whose house is filled with his late wife’s paintings of the lovely daughter she never had. Christena’s dislike of these paintings spreads to an obsession with the lead performer of a circus troupe. I enjoyed the twists and turns that kept this story from being a straightforward, plot point by plot point retelling.

The Princess in the Tower, by Elizabeth A. Lynn
In a book supposedly themed around horror, this spin on “Rapunzel” was instead funny and light. There is no tower here—just a beautiful valley somewhere in Italy where the pasta-obsessed residents decide that Margheritina is so slim (and, therefore, ugly) compared to the properly carb-enhanced beauties around her that she must be quite mad. Margheritina takes to the role with aplomb and enjoys herself immensely until she finds someone who can show her a more forgiving world. Yes, she is still physically rescued by her “prince,” but she also rescues herself by embracing her differences within the closed-minded valley and her skills once she leaves it.

Persimmon, by Harvey Jacobs
A wild ride of a scifi remix of “Thumbelina” set sort of vaguely in the modern day, with heavy overtones of death and life, as well as droll awareness of the gender issues in fairy tales. Not quite as overtly humorous as “The Princess in the Tower,” but certainly full of irony and wry wit.

Troll Bridge, by Neil Gaiman (because of course)
Am I ever going to find something by Neil Gaiman that I don’t like? Probably not. Maybe this is a departure from “The Three Billy Goats Gruff,” but our “goat” is very human…maybe too much so, in his own opinion. Powerful childhood imaginings and wanderings turn into adulthood’s more rote and spiritual/philosophical wanderings. Readers of [b:The Ocean at the End of the Lane|15783514|The Ocean at the End of the Lane|Neil Gaiman|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1497098563l/15783514._SY75_.jpg|21500681] may recognize some of the vaguely autobiographical details Gaiman has included about the unnamed narrator’s childhood.

A Sound, Like Angels Singing, by Leonard Ryskyk
Don’t read this one if you’re squeamish! It might take you a while to figure out who—or what—the narrator is, but in the meantime there’s a lot of gore and meat. Spoilers here, since part of what makes this short entry so fascinating is how long it takes to figure out the twists: the narrator is a rat in “The Pied Piper”.

Puss, by Ester M. Friesner
I absolutely loved this one! Friesner’s take on “Puss in Boots” is a little longer, which gave it plenty of time to build up a fascinating world of magic beings. Like “A Sound, Like Angels Singing,” it’s pretty brutal, but more personally, with rape, graphic abuse, and violence both center- and off-stage. But really, how can a cat lover like me resist a story told from the perspective of a powerful being that has taken up residence in the form of a cat? My only beef was at the very end, when the Puss character for some reason went from an agender being presenting as a feline female to a cisgender male human in order to be the princess’s love interest. Is that really necessary when we’ve already established that the character isn’t restricted to either?

The Snow Queen, by Patricia A. McKillip
As in the original, Gerda finds her strength on her own: “To be interesting, you must be interested” (p. 316). There’s a lot of fun play on language, not just words but grammar as well. The side characters are delightful: the thief-not-quite-turned-respectable business partner, the overbearing Foxx, even the Snow Queen in her boredom. Oh, and there’s this poignant bit in which an unexpected champion comes to Gerda’s rescue: “You’re not used to fending, so you don’t have the habit. So what you have to do is start pretending you have something to live for. … If you keep pretending and pretending, one day you’ll stumble onto something you care to live for. .. You only have to do it one day at a time. Always just today. That’s all any of us do.” (p. 322-323)


A few notes:
>> “I Shall Do Thee Mischief in the Wood” had a great twist at the end of the “Red Riding Hood” story, but I wish there’d been a little bit more to it—most of the story was buildup, if not particularly suspenseful, and while I don’t want the ending spelled out, I could have used another paragraph or two.
>> I felt the delightful concept of “The Springfield Swans”—that the seven [plus, in this story] sons in “The Seven Swans” made up a baseball team—was better than the straightforward execution.
>> In “The Root Mother,” I loved the first section, which was “Rapunzel” from the witch’s point of view, but I felt like the rest of the story fell flat into straight-up retelling, and that much of the (what I felt was strong) groundwork laid for the witch’s character was undone in a few casual sentences from the next narrator. Granted, this might have been because she was a teenager, but still…

>> And finally, Wendy Wheeler's "Little Red": Look, I know a lot is said and made of the sexual undertones of fairy tales, especially Little Red Riding Hood, but I found Wheeler's story deeply disturbing. In this contemporary-ish tale, we have a Red Riding Hood character who is underage and actively responding to the "wolf’s" seduction. I reread the story looking for some kind of critique of this pedophile or suggestion that he was misreading her desires, but if it was there, I didn't see it. Look, I know that 14-year-old kids may not be totally innocent and may be "trying on" the flirtation and sexuality that they see in the adult world around them, and the whole point of the "wolf" character is that any responsible adult should reject these advances. And I guess that's the story's point, that the narrator's lust and his response to Red are disgusting. But it was still sickening to read. As a piece of art that is meant to make the viewer/reader uncomfortable, it certainly succeeds. I guess this is the only story that felt like true horror to me--as in, it was the only one that built to a genuinely horrifying conclusion. The pedophiles and rapists in "I Shall Do Thee Mischief in the Wood", "Little Poucet" (also gross), and "Puss" (and others I may be forgetting) all had their comeuppances...but in "Little Red" we didn't get that. Maybe it's more realistic...but it's also what makes "Little Red" the worst kind of horror. ( )
  books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
I wish I had not wasted my money OR time on this book. One story is about a sexual predator grooming the mother to get to the daughter. Nasty!!! Most are depressing, violent and/or sexual. I can't think of even one that I would enjoy re-reading. ( )
  mitchma | Mar 10, 2019 |
There are books, and then there are keepers. Books are the ones you enjoy but don't have any problem trading away at the used book store. Keepers…well, those are the ones you hold on to, on the off-chance you'll read them again. Even if you don't, you can look at them on your shelves and think, "my, that was good…I remember…"

This is a keeper.

In short, it's a collection of short stories based on, or inspired by, the fairy tales you enjoyed (or were frightened by) as a child. It's a concept that's been explored before, perhaps, but it's fertile enough ground, so much so that editors Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow have done several volumes of similar material since. The only problem, if any, is that several of these stories were also printed in The Year's "Best Fantasy and Horror"--also, not coincidentally, edited by Windling and Datlow. So, if you have both, read this one first. Or not, chances are pretty darned good you'll want to read these repeatedly.

A keeper, in other words. If you find it, or any of its successors, buy it, read it, keep it. ( )
  Jamski | Jul 18, 2018 |
I appreciated a few stories. Susan Wade's "Like a Red, Red Rose" was a sad, magical tale that moved with the uncaring force of nature. Wendy Wheeler's "Little Red" was written well though disturbingly from the perspective of modern-day sexual predator. Elizabeth A. Lynn's presented three sides of the "Rapunzel" tale in "The Root of the Matter", and I enjoyed her concluding section if not the other two. "Breadcrumbs and Stones" captivated me with its meta use of a folktale. Neil Gaiman's "Troll Bridge" was my favorite for its symbolism.

Unfortunately, the good stories didn't make up for the ones I strongly disliked. That's the problem with an anthology -- it has to be taken as a whole. The more violently sexual stories were intolerable (particularly "Little Poucet") while other stories were surprisingly bland.

I ended up donating the copy I'd purchased to my community library. Hopefully, someone else is enjoying that copy. ( )
  aspirit | May 7, 2018 |
collections of short stories by all different authors are always a mixed bag, and this anthology is no exception. some are really enjoyable, and some are less so, but a worthwhile read. however, i counted an unacceptable total of 14 spelling errors, which diminishes my enjoyment a bit. ( )
1 abstimmen Darth-Heather | May 31, 2016 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (1 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Datlow, EllenHerausgeberHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Windling, TerriHerausgeberHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Dann, JackMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
de Lint, CharlesMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Edmonds, RyanMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Friesner, Esther M.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Frost, GregoryMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Gaiman, NeilMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Goldstein, LisaMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Jacobs, HarveyMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Koja, KatheMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Kress, NancyMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Lee, TanithMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Lynn, Elizabeth A.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
McKillip, Patricia A.MitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Rysdyk, LeonardMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Stevermer, CarolineMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Tem, MelanieMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Tem, Steve RasnicMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Wade, SusanMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Wheeler, WendyMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Wilson, GahanMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Yolen, JaneMitwirkenderCo-Autoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Canty, ThomasUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
A true fairytale is, to my mind, very like the sonata. If two or three men sat down to write each what the sonata meant to him, what approximation to definite idea would be the result? A fairytale, a sonata, a gathering storm, a limitless night, seizes you and sweeps you away. The law of each is in the mind of its composer; that law makes one man feel this way, another man feel that way. To one the sonata is a world of odour and beauty, to another of soothing only and sweetness. To one the cloudy rendezvous is a wild dance, with terror at its heart; to another a majestic march of heavenly hosts, with Truth in their center pointing their course but as yet restraining her voice. Nature is mood-engendering, thought-provoking, such out the sonata, the fairytale to be.
--George McDonald, in "Fantasists on Fantasy", edited by Robert H. Boyer and Kenneth J. Zahorski
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
For Thomas Canty, my artistic partner, dear friend, and companion through the lands of fairy tales
T.W.

For Doris Leibowitz Datlow, who read the fairy tales to me and along with me when I was growing up. Thanks mom.
E.D.

And in memoriam to Angela Carter, whose peerless adult fairy tales have inspired so many of us, and shall keep true wonder alive.
E.D. & T.W.
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
At a time not so long ago, in a land much like our own, there was a cottage at the edge of a daark, haunted forest.
Introduction (T.W.): In Italy in one of the earliest recorded versions of the story of "Sleeping Beauty," the princess is awakened not by a kiss but by the suckling of the twin children she has given birth to, impregnated by the prince while she lay in her enchanted sleep.
Introduction (E.D.): When Terri and I began to solicit stories based on fairy tales for Snow White, Blood Red, the first question we were asked by many of the writers we approached was: "What counts as a fairy tale?"
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

"You hold in your hands a volume of wonders - magical tales of trolls and ogres, of bewitched princesses and kingdoms accursed, penned by some of the most acclaimed fantasists of our day. But these are not bedtime stories designed to usher an innocent child gently into the realm of dreams. These are stories that bite - lush and erotic, often dark and disturbing mystical journeys through a phantasmagoric landscape of distinctly adult sensibilities." "Set in haunted forests, amid the recognizable urban sprawl of contemporary society, or in worlds beyond our imagining, here are the lusts, dreams and nightmares of the human animal - presented in a manner that would make the Grimm brothers proud. From provocative alternate takes on time-honored myths - Tanith Lee's sensuous and unsettling futuristic retelling of Snow White; Gahan Wilson's delightful account of the Frog Prince in therapy - to stunningly original new tales rich in archetypal imagery - Steve Rasnic Tem's deliciously gruesome chronicle of a miniature child abandoned in a city of giants. Each is a compelling grown-up fable relevant to the times in which we live." "Through the collective creative genius of such masters as Charles de Lint, Nancy Kress, Jane Yolen and many others, the magical characters we loved in childhood have been reborn. But Jack is older, though no wiser now...and he has climbed the beanstalk one time too many. Rapunzel's sweet innocence has vanished like a song on the wind. And there is no such thing as "happily ever after.""--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.79)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5 1
2 11
2.5 1
3 68
3.5 15
4 112
4.5 6
5 56

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,342,735 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar