StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Ragged Dick and Struggling Upward (Penguin Classics) (1868)

von Horatio Alger Jr.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
2106102,366 (3.31)3
From the 1860's through the 1890s, Horatio Alger wrote hundreds of novels to teach young boys the merits of honesty, hard work, and cheerfulness in the face of adversity. As Carl Bode points out in his introduction, Horatio Alger filled a void in American literature and met scant competition both in the nature and the number of his works. Like his heroes, Alger rose to the top by chance, coincidence, and hard work. The hero of Ragged Dick is a veritable "diamond in the rough"--as innately virtuous as he is streetwise and cocky. Immediately popular with young readers, the novel also appealed to parents, who repsonded to its colorful espousal of the Protestant ethic. Struggling Upward, published nearly thirty years later, followed the same time-tested formulas, and despite critical indifference it, too, had mass appeal. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.… (mehr)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Fun-humor, dated, good morals portrayed for bright upper elementary
  keithhamblen | May 26, 2020 |
I had to read this one when I was in undergrad for a lit class that looked at the history of publishing (which in itself was very interesting). The history of this series of stories is more interesting than this book itself, in my opinion. More of a perspective of the times but not a book I'd recommend for pleasure reading. ( )
  justagirlwithabook | Aug 1, 2018 |
The late Carl Bode provides a brilliant re-setting of the diamond which Horatio Alger constitutes in the crown jewels of America.

The author of "Ragged Dick" first published in 1868 created a lasting meme. Horatio Alger Jr. (1834–1899) was a Unitarian minister who inspired the "rags to riches" myth of America. He made a fortune writing dime novels, such as this notable one, that inspired people to work hard to get rewarded by success. Perhaps ironically, he died in poverty and he was born privileged.

Unlike other dime novels, this one contains abundant insightful literary references, and I think Alger deserves literary recognition. The critic, and Alger scholar, Gary Scharnhorst, has fortunately done much to recover the proper legacy of Alger's forgotten, and worse, slandered and fictional legacy. For example, he notes the rich "literary allusions". "These allusions are what set his work apart from the pulps". I found in this story for boys, wonderful references to the Bible, Shakespeare, Milton, Longfellow, Cicero, Horace, Addison, Oliver Goldsmith, Alexander Pope, Thomas Gray, William Cowper, among others.

While this was his fourth book, this was the first financial success. It also made him famous and remains at the apex of the expression of his craft. Ragged Dick, is a post-Civil War "gilded age" dime-novel first-person narrative of a bootblack's rise from the streets of New York City to middle-class "spectability" as a gentleman.

Interestingly, Ragged Dick's hard work and honesty alone do not bring success. A stranger with a lot of money -- a kind-hearted merchant, rare in his or in any age -- recognizes his courage and integrity, and rewards Dick with a job after Dick saves his daughter from drowning.

There are also stock characters that are evil: the snobbish youth (cousin), and the rich, greedy squire (uncle). Readers could and can recognize the investment bankers and fraudsters of the "Gilded Age" and this one.

The author spent a lot of time with boys, and knows their tricks, and their hearts yearning for adventure and success. When Alger was forced to leave the ministry, he went to New York City. Thousands of orphaned, abandoned, or runaway boys were on the streets as a result of the Civil War.

{How many? "Compiling casualty figures for Civil War soldiers is a complex process. Indeed, it is so complex that even 150 years later no one has, and perhaps no one will, assemble a specific, accurate set of numbers, especially on the Confederate side." But we know that the Civil War resulted in over 620,000 dead soldiers, as many maimed, and millions of women widowed or abandoned. http://www.civilwar.org/education/civil-war-casualties.html . There is no sure number of how many boys and girls were living on the streets. The exact number is hardly the point.}

Alger also taught and tended the boys at William Taylor Adam's boy's school. Adams was an editor and author of his own and other exciting juvenalia for both sexes. Alger published for years in Adams's Student and Schoolmate, a boys' magazine of moral writings. This book was first published in that organ.

The Plot: Ragged Dick is fourteen years old and he smokes, drinks rotgut, and sleeps wherever he can. We learn that he really understands right from wrong and devotes himself to being helpful. He hates to see harm done to others. He will not steal. He is not at all envious of the rich, but is determined to become "spectable".

A number of gentlemen appear who offer their aid to his obvious privations. Mr. Greyson, admires the attitude and courage he sees, and invites him to church. Mr. Whitney rewards him with five dollars for performing a service. Dick uses the money to open a bank account. Then he pays rent on an apartment. He saves and banks more money. He sets up a domestic partnership with Fosdick who teaches him the three R's.

By happenstance -- and Dick is ready for such luck -- Dick rescues a drowning child. The father of the child rewards him with a new suit and a job in his mercantile firm. Dick now becomes Richard Hunter, Esq. and declares his rejection of the "the old vagabond life".

"Ragged Dick" (and his successors) exerted a profound impact on America in the Gilded Age, and to this day. This book is Alger's lasting legacy. Sadly, his reputation still suffers from the infamies of a Puritan community, the savage hypocrisy of the religious, and effect of the steroid of avarice upon our plutocracy. A slanderous and fictional "biography" -- later admitted to be pure fiction -- was written after his death. Alger was homosexual and his sister was ashamed of him and destroyed his letters. Historians have reconstructed history out of the deceptions and "the crooked timber of humanity from which no straight thing was ever made".
{Immanuel Kant, "Idea for a General History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose" (1784), Proposition 6}.

Interestingly, even as Richard Hunter Esq., Ragged Dick never becomes "rich". And the wealthy folks who fail to help the poor are seen as despicable, from beginning to end. ( )
  keylawk | Jan 13, 2014 |
Luke's nice. Aside from reminding me of some Bobbsey Twins books, there's nothing particularly outstanding about this story - well, it's the first Alger I've read with a country-boy hero rather than a city boy. Randolph is irredeemably nasty, so it's obvious he's going to fall on his face eventually. It never is explained why Reed leaves the box with Luke, aside from not wanting to put it in the bank - if he can hang around and check on it, why can't he keep it? And like that. Not bad, not wonderful. I like Ragged Dick better (read that before, and reviewed it, in a separate edition. Didn't read it now). ( )
  jjmcgaffey | Apr 3, 2009 |
Just what they are said to be: moralizing stories about boys. Not much depth as far as plot goes. Interesting- Adventurous. No depth of character either. The first story includes a very interesting description of New York City. High level of vocabulary considering the intended audience. ( )
  SaraPrindiville | Apr 10, 2008 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

From the 1860's through the 1890s, Horatio Alger wrote hundreds of novels to teach young boys the merits of honesty, hard work, and cheerfulness in the face of adversity. As Carl Bode points out in his introduction, Horatio Alger filled a void in American literature and met scant competition both in the nature and the number of his works. Like his heroes, Alger rose to the top by chance, coincidence, and hard work. The hero of Ragged Dick is a veritable "diamond in the rough"--as innately virtuous as he is streetwise and cocky. Immediately popular with young readers, the novel also appealed to parents, who repsonded to its colorful espousal of the Protestant ethic. Struggling Upward, published nearly thirty years later, followed the same time-tested formulas, and despite critical indifference it, too, had mass appeal. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.31)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 2
4 4
4.5
5 1

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,583,745 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar