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Der blinde Mörder (2000)

von Margaret Atwood

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
15,428372290 (3.92)1040
Die 82-jährige Iris blickt auf ihr Leben und die Ereignisse um den frühen Tod ihrer Schwester Laura unmittelbar nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkriegs zurück und versucht sich Klarheit zu verschaffen. Laura, die durch die posthume Veröffentlichung ihres Romans "Der blinde Mörder" schlagartig berühmt wurde, hatte sich das Leben genommen. - Raffiniert konstruierte Liebesgeschichte aus dem Kanada der 30er Jahre. (Irmgard Andrae) Die verarmte 82-jährige Iris blickt auf ihr Leben und vor allem auf die Ereignisse um den frühen Tod ihrer Schwester Laura in den 40er-Jahren zurück, die sich nach dem Tod des geliebten Mannes von einer Brücke stürzte und in deren Schatten Iris selbst jahrelang lebte. (Irmgard Andrae)… (mehr)
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    sturlington: Writers and books within books.
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    KayCliff: Laura Chase in The Blind Assassin falls to her death from a bridge over a ravine, just as Stella falls to hers from a roof. The Blind Assassin is concerned with finding out why Laura fell, with newspaper reports given, excerpts from a novel quoted, and passages of narration from Laura's sister -- all out of chronological sequence; just as the cause of Stella's fall is sought through Ullmann's novel by a variety of narrators, with excerpts from a video, all simililarly out of chronological order. Both Stella and Laura act as nurses, and fall prey to unprincipled men. Both novels include a pair of sisters whose mother dies when they are young, leaving the elder girl to take care of the younger; children with absent or unknown fathers; and someone very old, near to their own death, who loved Laura/Stella. Laura's sister fancies, `there was no floor to my room: I was suspended in the air, about to plummet. My fall would be endless -- endlessly down'. Stella's daughter tells her sister, `Mama fell off a roof, Mama's falling still. She falls and falls and never hits the ground'.… (mehr)
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    PrincessPaulina: Main characters are seniors, reexamining their biographies at the end of their lives.
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    PghDragonMan: Deception is layered on deception until even the truth looks false.
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The Blind Assassin : A Novel by Margaret Atwood (2001)
  sharibillops | May 20, 2022 |
It never really grabbed me. I didn't mind reading it, but I was glad when I finished and could move on to something else ( )
  smbass | Jan 30, 2022 |
"قضاوت خوب نتیجه تجربه است. تجربه نتیجه قضاوت بد است."

آدمکش کور ابتدا داستانی معمایی به نظر میاد با سه روایت تو در تو که به تدریج مسیر داستان رو شفاف می کنن. روایت اول با توصیف ایریس از روز مرگ خواهرش شروع می شود: "ده روز بعد از تمام شدن جنگ، خواهرم لورا خود را با ماشین از روی پل به پایین پرت کرد." در ادامه، ایریس به روایت زندگی خودش و خواهرش می پردازه. روایت دوم داستان کتاب "آدمکش کور" هست: کتاب لورا که بعد از مرگش منتشر شده که موضوعی درباره رابطه مخفیانه میان دو معشوق دارد. روایت سوم هم داستانی خیالی و ساختگی است که میان مرد و زن روایت قبل رد و بدل می شود: فرقه ای از آدمکشان، دختران باکره را قربانی پروردگار می کنند.

یکی از درون مایه های کتاب، حول نقش زنان در جامعه بین دو جنگ جهانی می چرخه. موقعیت و سرنوشتی ناامیدکننده که از طریق روابط و ثروت اون ها به دست میاد نه به وسیله خودشون.
داستان خوبی داشت، شخصیت پردازی ها با جزییات فراوان بود. توصیفات صحنه ها هم خیلی زیاد بود.

"دیکتاتوری روی دیگر فداکاری است."

یکی از مشکلات کتاب صوتی این بود که سه روایت به خوبی از هم تفکیک نمی شدند و اوایل کار رو خیلی سخت می کرد. متوجه شدم در کتاب این مشکل وجود نداشته و این مساله به نظرم تو کتاب صوتی، روایت ها رو بعضا گنگ و کسل کننده می کرد.

"از لطف کردن متنفرم. از مردمی هم که به لطف کردن افتخار می کنند، متنفرم: آدم های از خود متشکری که با بخشیدن چند سنت ادعای مهربانی می کنند. آن ها نفرت انگیزند." ( )
  Milad_Gharebaghi | Jan 14, 2022 |
Odi et amo – I hate and I love. Catullus’s famous paradox was not meant to describe books, but it neatly sums up my reaction to Margaret Atwood’s pluri-prizewinning novel “The Blind Assassin”.

The 20th century is coming to an end and Iris Chase, now in her eighties, knows that her days are numbered too. She decides to write her memoirs for the benefit of her estranged granddaughter Sabrina. Her tale starts chillingly: Ten days after the war ended, my sister Laura drove a car off a bridge. Having given us a glimpse of her tale’s dark ending, Iris takes us back to the Chase siblings’ protected childhood in the (fictional) Southern Ontario town of Port Ticonderoga, where their father is a respected factory owner. The business goes through a hard time and is bought out by the Griffen family, whose upcoming scion Richard Griffen eventually marries Iris. It is an unhappy match which holds within it the seeds of tragedy.

Iris’s recollections form the main narrative strand of the novel and, set as they are in the unsettled decades between the two World Wars, they give the book the feel of a historical novel or a family saga, rendered more authentic through references to actual events. This being Atwood however, the structure of the novel soon becomes increasingly complex. We learn that Laura Chase has become a literary sensation thanks to her posthumously published roman-a-clef “The Blind Assassin”, extracts of which are interspered with Iris’s story. Laura’s novel is apparently autobiographical, chronicling her love affair with one Alex Thomas, a Communist-leaning writer of pulp fiction. As if this novel-within-a-novel were not enough, Alex spices up the lovers’ encounters with storytelling, which spawns a third narrative strand – a quasi-scifi tale about the exploits of a “blind assassin” in the fantastical Planet Zycron. The Baboushka-dolls structure underlines this (meta-)novel’s obsession with the blurred boundaries between fact and fiction, reality and fantasy, truth and deceit.

Atwood’s novel has been described as a postmodernist masterpiece and I have little hesitation in agreeing with this appraisal. Its potentially convoluted structure is deftly handled, leading to an effective climax in the final chapters. The dialogue and narrative voice are perfectly pitched and hardly a page goes by without the reader chancing upon an arresting image, observation or turn-of-phrase. Yet, I often found myself viscerally hating the novel and it took me a real effort to finish it. Why?

I think that it’s mostly down to the novel’s or, to be exact, Iris’s worldview. Her bitterness poisons all the characters, who invariably come across as scheming, manipulative and cruel or, at best, short-sighted and naive. Even Laura, who has little time for material trappings and is one of the more “spiritual” figures in the book, has the nasty habit of entering into “pacts” with God. Which, it must be said, He consistently breaks.

Indeed, the novel’s world is one in which everything is subject to negotiation and everything is up for sale. This applies particularly to the women who, like the bosomy figures in Alex Thomas’s pulp stories, are merely chattel in a male-dominated society.

Yes, I know – Atwood is making a very valid point here. And, yes, I do appreciate that sometimes an argument needs to be strongly (and unsubtly?) presented for it to strike home. And I know as well that one should not mistake a character’s point of view with that of the novel and still less with that of the author.

But the fact remains that I found the novel’s bleakness suffocating, its dark humour and glinting brilliance merely rubbing salt into this reader’s wounds. At the risk of sounding like an Eastenders fan who rants at the actor playing the baddie, I’ll give a miserly two stars to this dazzling novel which I hated ... and loved.
( )
  JosephCamilleri | Jan 1, 2022 |
A giudicare dalle recensioni entusiastiche penso di far parte di una ristretta minoranza, ma questo libro non mi è piaciuto un granché.
Ci ho ritrovato tutti i difetti che avevo riscontrato ne Il racconto dell'ancella, senza che a compensare ci fosse una trama altrettanto suggestiva o un messaggio così potente.
Innanzitutto la scrittura è fredda, formalmente perfetta ma senza un briciolo di drammaticità; questo ovviamente si riflette sui personaggi, che non riescono mai a diventare tridimensionali, sono l'archetipo perfetto dell'ideale che devono simboleggiare: l'affarista senza scrupoli, la ragazza illusa ed ingenua e così via. Capisco che probabilmente sia un effetto voluto, ascrivibile al fatto che la narrazione è solo ed unicamente dal punto di vista di Iris, ma ne esce fuori un racconto in cui non ci si emoziona mai davvero. Le parti su Sakiel-Norn sono affascinanti ma poco approfondite, l'autrice sembra quasi dimenticarsene ed arrivati alla fine non si capisce quale sia la loro funzione se non fornire un titolo stravagante al romanzo.
Forse però l'aspetto che mi ha infastidito di più è la prolissità: seicento pagine scandite da un ritmo lento e ripetitivo, un'eterna introduzione in attesa del colpo di scena che era prevedibile sin dalle prime righe. Ho sperato fino all'ultimo che ci fosse dell'altro, ma invece era davvero tutto lì.
Naturalmente riconosco che la Atwood dal punto di vista tecnico ha fatto un lavoro certosino, intersecando vari piani di lettura in una complicatissima struttura ad incastri: agli amanti della bella scrittura e della perfezione formale questo libro non può non piacere; per chi come me ricerca un coinvolgimento più viscerale, con personaggi forti ed una storia solida alle spalle, la delusione è dietro l'angolo.
Buon libro, non per tutti. ( )
  Lilirose_ | Dec 18, 2021 |
Margaret Atwood poses a provocative question in her new novel, "The Blind Assassin." How much are the bad turns of one's life determined by things beyond our control, like sex and class, and how much by personal responsibility? Unlike most folks who raise this question so that they can wag their finger -- she's made her bed, and so on -- Atwood's foray into this moral terrain is complex and surprising. Far from preaching to the converted, Atwood's cunning tale assumes a like-minded reader only so that she can argue, quite persuasively, from the other side.
hinzugefügt von stephmo | bearbeitenSalon.com, Karen Houppert (Dec 12, 2000)
 
In her tenth novel, Margaret Atwood again demonstrates that she has mastered the art of creating dense, complex fictions from carefully layered narratives, making use of an array of literary devices - flashbacks, multiple time schemes, ambiguous, indeterminate plots - and that she can hook her readers by virtue of her exceptional story-telling skills. The Blind Assassin is not a book that can easily be put to one side, in spite of its length and the fact that its twists and turns occasionally try the patience; yet it falls short of making the emotional impact that its suggestive and slippery plot at times promises.
hinzugefügt von stephmo | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Alex Clark (Sep 30, 2000)
 
Ms. Atwood's absorbing new novel, ''The Blind Assassin,'' features a story within a story within a story -- a science-fiction yarn within a hard-boiled tale of adultery within a larger narrative about familial love and dissolution. The novel is largely unencumbered by the feminist ideology that weighed down such earlier Atwood novels as ''The Edible Woman'' and ''The Handmaid's Tale,'' and for the most part it is also shorn of those books' satiric social vision. In fact, of all the author's books to date, ''The Blind Assassin'' is most purely a work of entertainment -- an expertly rendered Daphne du Maurieresque tale that showcases Ms. Atwood's narrative powers and her ardent love of the Gothic.
 
In her ingenious new tale of love, rivalry, and deception, The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood interweaves several genres — a confessional memoir, a pulp fantasy novel, newspaper clippings — to tease out the secrets behind the 1945 death of 25-year-old socialite Laura Chase.
 
Nearly 20 years ago, in speaking of her craft, the novelist Margaret Atwood observed that ''a character in a book who is consistently well behaved probably spells disaster for the book.'' She might have asserted the more general principle that consistent anything in a character can prove tedious. If we apply the old Forsterian standard that round characters are ones ''capable of surprising in a convincing way,'' Atwood's new novel, for all its multilayered story-within-a-story-within-a-story construction, must be judged flat as a pancake. In ''The Blind Assassin,'' overlong and badly written, our first impressions of the dramatis personae prove not so much lasting as total.
hinzugefügt von stephmo | bearbeitenNew York Times, Thomas Mallon (Sep 3, 2000)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (35 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Margaret AtwoodHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Belletti, RaffaellaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Dionne, MargotErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Pulice, Mario JUmschlaggestalterCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Tarkka, HannaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Imagine the monarch Agha Mohammad Khan, who orders the entire population of the city of Kerman murdered or blinded—no exceptions. His praetorians set energetically to work. They line up the inhabitants, slice off the heads of the adults, gouge out the eyes of the children. . . . Later, processions of blinded children leave the city. Some, wandering around in the countryside, lose their way in the desert and die of thirst. Other groups reach inhabited settlements...singing songs about the extermination of the citizens of Kerman. . . .

—Ryszard Kapuściński
I swam, the sea was boundless, I saw no shore.
Tanit was merciless, my prayers were answered.
O you who drown in love, remember me.

— Inscription on a Carthaginian Funerary Urn
The word is a flame burning in a dark glass.

—Sheila Watson
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Ten days after the war ended, my sister Laura drove a car off a bridge. The bridge was being repaired: she went right through the Danger sign. The car fell a hundred feet into the ravine, smashing through the treetops feathery with new leaves, then burst into flames and rolled down into the shallow creek at the bottom. Chunks of the bridge fell on top of it. Nothing much was left of her but charred smithereens.
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Farewells can be shattering, but returns are surely worse. Solid flesh can never live up the bright shadow cast by its absence.
What virtue was once attached to this notion—of going beyond your strength, of not sparing yourself, of ruining your health! Nobody is born with that kind of selflessness: it can be acquired only by the most relentless discipline, a crushing-out of natural inclination, and by my time the knack or secret of it must have been lost.
I'm sorry, I'm just not interested.
Or perhaps she's just softening me up: she's a Baptist, she'd like me to find Jesus, or vice versa, before it's too late. That kind of thing doesn't run in her family: her mother Reenie never went in much for God. There was mutual respect, and if you were in trouble, naturally you'd call on him, as with lawyers, but as with lawyers, it would have to be bad trouble. Otherwise it didn't pay to get too mixed up with him.
She knew the family histories, or at least something about them. What she would tell me varied in relation to my age, and also in relation to how distracted she was at the time. Nevertheless, in this way I collected enough fragments of the past to make a reconstruction of it, which must have borne as much relation to the real thing as a mosaic portrait would to the original. I didn't want realism anyway: I wanted things to be highly coloured, simple in outline, without ambiguity, which is what most children want when it comes to the stories of their parents. They want a postcard.
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Die 82-jährige Iris blickt auf ihr Leben und die Ereignisse um den frühen Tod ihrer Schwester Laura unmittelbar nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkriegs zurück und versucht sich Klarheit zu verschaffen. Laura, die durch die posthume Veröffentlichung ihres Romans "Der blinde Mörder" schlagartig berühmt wurde, hatte sich das Leben genommen. - Raffiniert konstruierte Liebesgeschichte aus dem Kanada der 30er Jahre. (Irmgard Andrae) Die verarmte 82-jährige Iris blickt auf ihr Leben und vor allem auf die Ereignisse um den frühen Tod ihrer Schwester Laura in den 40er-Jahren zurück, die sich nach dem Tod des geliebten Mannes von einer Brücke stürzte und in deren Schatten Iris selbst jahrelang lebte. (Irmgard Andrae)

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