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Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey…
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Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture… (2006. Auflage)

von Randall Balmer (Autor)

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299467,009 (3.83)3
The televangelists may be the most conspicuous element of the evangelical subculture in America, and the bizarre antics of some of the most prominent figures--Oral Roberts, Jim Bakker, or Jimmy Swaggart--make for amusing film clips on the evening news. But as Randall Balmer reveals in thisvivid and colorful narrative, these men make up only a small part of a strikingly diverse religious movement; in fact, the Falwells and the Bakkers are marginal figures, of only moderate importance to the many fundamentalist, charismatic, and pentecostal believers in the United States.When it was first published in 1989, it was universally hailed as a sensitive, moving, and enlightening account of a religious phenomena little understood and often ridiculed. Now the companion volume to a forthcoming PBS television series hosted by Balmer, Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glorycriss-crosses the country--from Oregon to Florida, from Texas to North Dakota--to take readers on a journey into the heart of evangelical America. In an evenhanded, reflective series of New Yorker-style profiles, Balmer gives one the sense of what it is like to sit in on classes in the DallasTheological Seminary or to accompany evangelical activists as they mobilize support for Pat Robertson and Jack Kemp at the 1988 Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary. We visit an old-fashioned holiness camp meeting in St. Petersburg, Florida, an Indian reservation in the Dakotas, a huge tradeshow for Christian booksellers, and a fundamentalist Bible camp in the Adirondacks. In addition, the expanded edition includes a profile of the Multnomah School of the Bible, a fundamentalist Bible institute in Portland, Oregon; tells the story of the pentecostal congregation in Valdosta, Georgiathat decided to join ranks with the Episcopal Church; and offers an account of Billy Graham's recent crusade that brought tens of thousands into New York's Central Park. Throughout, Balmer fills in the theological and historical background--on the Jesus Movement in California, for instance, orProtestant missionary work among Native-Americans--creating in effect a capsule history of evangelicism. And while Balmer acknowledges a certain sympathy with evangelicism, he doesn't gloss over its failings--the combativeness and exclusivity that permeate much of its teachings, or the pervasivetheology of prosperity which Balmer deplores as "the sanctification of American consumerism."But perhaps what stands out most in this book is the people Balmer meets on his journey, ranging from the evangelical filmmaker Donald Thompson to pentecostal faith healers to fervent young evangelists working the beaches of southern California. It is through their eyes that we see into theheart of American evangelicism, that we understand the genuine appeal of the movement and thereby arrive at a more accurate and balanced portrait of an abiding tradition that, as the author argues, is both rich in theological insights and mired in contradictions.… (mehr)
Mitglied:top19
Titel:Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America
Autoren:Randall Balmer (Autor)
Info:Oxford University Press (2006), Edition: 4, 368 pages
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Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America von Randall Balmer

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7
  OberlinSWAP | Aug 1, 2015 |
7
  OberlinSWAP | Aug 1, 2015 |
This book is dated, so if you want to know about the current movers and shakers in the evangelical churches, you should look elsewhere. Also, Balmer is not a critical secularist; his portraits are sympathetic, if not always complementary.

However, if you want to know about the history of evangelicalism and why it is so diverse, this is an excellent book. Balmer visited a range of evangelical groups, including the bastion of evangelical theology, Dallas Theological Seminary; Capstone Cathedral, a very kooky off-shoot of Pentecostalism; Calvary Chapel in California, a proto-mega church; and group of dissident evangelicals from Trinity College. Each group is not only profiled, but set in historical context. This is an area I know a lot about and I still found new insights and connections in this book. ( )
  aulsmith | Jul 5, 2014 |
Some insights, but nothing really new. Suffers from being outdated (how can you talk about mega churches without mentioning Saddleback these days?)
  KC_in_KS | Aug 3, 2011 |
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The televangelists may be the most conspicuous element of the evangelical subculture in America, and the bizarre antics of some of the most prominent figures--Oral Roberts, Jim Bakker, or Jimmy Swaggart--make for amusing film clips on the evening news. But as Randall Balmer reveals in thisvivid and colorful narrative, these men make up only a small part of a strikingly diverse religious movement; in fact, the Falwells and the Bakkers are marginal figures, of only moderate importance to the many fundamentalist, charismatic, and pentecostal believers in the United States.When it was first published in 1989, it was universally hailed as a sensitive, moving, and enlightening account of a religious phenomena little understood and often ridiculed. Now the companion volume to a forthcoming PBS television series hosted by Balmer, Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glorycriss-crosses the country--from Oregon to Florida, from Texas to North Dakota--to take readers on a journey into the heart of evangelical America. In an evenhanded, reflective series of New Yorker-style profiles, Balmer gives one the sense of what it is like to sit in on classes in the DallasTheological Seminary or to accompany evangelical activists as they mobilize support for Pat Robertson and Jack Kemp at the 1988 Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary. We visit an old-fashioned holiness camp meeting in St. Petersburg, Florida, an Indian reservation in the Dakotas, a huge tradeshow for Christian booksellers, and a fundamentalist Bible camp in the Adirondacks. In addition, the expanded edition includes a profile of the Multnomah School of the Bible, a fundamentalist Bible institute in Portland, Oregon; tells the story of the pentecostal congregation in Valdosta, Georgiathat decided to join ranks with the Episcopal Church; and offers an account of Billy Graham's recent crusade that brought tens of thousands into New York's Central Park. Throughout, Balmer fills in the theological and historical background--on the Jesus Movement in California, for instance, orProtestant missionary work among Native-Americans--creating in effect a capsule history of evangelicism. And while Balmer acknowledges a certain sympathy with evangelicism, he doesn't gloss over its failings--the combativeness and exclusivity that permeate much of its teachings, or the pervasivetheology of prosperity which Balmer deplores as "the sanctification of American consumerism."But perhaps what stands out most in this book is the people Balmer meets on his journey, ranging from the evangelical filmmaker Donald Thompson to pentecostal faith healers to fervent young evangelists working the beaches of southern California. It is through their eyes that we see into theheart of American evangelicism, that we understand the genuine appeal of the movement and thereby arrive at a more accurate and balanced portrait of an abiding tradition that, as the author argues, is both rich in theological insights and mired in contradictions.

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