StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the…
Lädt ...

Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human… (2008. Auflage)

von Neil Shubin (Autor)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
2,231655,456 (3.93)157
KNO: Der Mensch ist ein Tier unter Tieren, Ergebnis einer Milliarde Jahre dauernden Evolution. Spuren und Reste dieser Entwicklung sind in unserem Körper aufbewahrt, in der Form unserer Knochen, der Struktur unserer DNA. Ein ganzer Zweig des Baum des Lebens ist tief in uns eingelassen KNO: Der Mensch ist ein Tier unter Tieren, Ergebnis einer Milliarde Jahre dauernden Evolution. Spuren und Reste dieser Entwicklung sind in unserem Körper aufbewahrt, in der Form unserer Knochen, der Struktur unserer DNA. Ein ganzer Zweig des Baum des Lebens ist tief in uns eingelassen.… (mehr)
Mitglied:EugenioNegro
Titel:Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
Autoren:Neil Shubin (Autor)
Info:Pantheon (2008), Edition: First, 240 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:****
Tags:Keine

Werk-Informationen

Der Fisch in uns: Eine Reise durch die 3,5 Milliarden Jahre alte Geschichte unseres Körpers von Neil Shubin

Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

The Aug. 11 issue of the journal Science indicated that the United States ranks near the bottom of developed countries when it comes to public acceptance of Evolution. Data from 32 European Countries, the U.S. and Japan showed that only Turkey ranked lower. Among the factors contributing to America's low score are poor understanding of biology, the politicization of science, and the literal interpretation of the Bible by a small but vocal group of American Christians, the Michigan State researchers say.

Therefore, the Inner Fish probably won't be well received by the American masses, since it discusses the discovery of a "missing link" type of fish in 2006, and discusses how life can be seen to have evolved from fish to the earliest land dwellers. If you are convinced that the world is only 6000 years old, then his description of his discovery of a 375 billion year-old fish fossil won't move you. However, if you're open to the idea, you might find his descriptions of similarities between fish, sharks, and even sponges with human organs very interesting. His recent discovery of the "missing-link" fish was reportedly the first to show joints in the fins which correspond to the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger. Schubin explains how those limbs appear to have evolved over time, linking sea life to life on land. He also describes, in laymans terms, how many other body parts, such as eyes and ears, have similarities in other ancient creatures. It was enlightening, easy to understand, and compelling, and not to worry, it isn't written like a science journal.
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
A really excellent book that gives some insight to how we came to be here and the consequences of ancient choices on our bodies. ( )
  robert_goss | Apr 19, 2021 |
Your Inner Fish
A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
By: Neil Shubin
This was a terrific look at how nature was a recycler of ideas! Through the years if something didn't work nature didn't necessarily make a new creature but used recycled ideas on creatures to see where that would lead. The book just didn't cover paleontology but also genetics, biology, and more. It was very informative and interesting! The way the information is presented is light and comfortable, touch of humor, and easy to follow. If this genre interests you, then this is a must read! ( )
  MontzaleeW | Dec 29, 2020 |
I read the German translation. There were a few mistakes I noticed, but the translation was smooth and easy to read.

In many ways I agree with the reviewers who felt that a lot of the detail could easily have been left out - and I skimmed and skipped when it got too much for me. I certainly realized early on that I would not enjoy most aspects of his job. This starts with crawling around in snow and slush in the middle of summer, and goes on to staring at similar features of various animals under a microscope for hours on end. Or even to trying to teach human anatomy to college premed majors. (For that matter, even learning the names of every bone and muscle myself.)

On the other hand, what shone brightly from every page was the fact that Shubin does enjoy his work. He is fascinated by the details he goes on (and on) about. He is enthusiastic about teaching.

So if lots of details about fish innards are not really your thing, and you aren't really ready for your inner sea anemone, be prepared to skip some parts. Oh, but don't miss the explanation of why human males get hernias. Or did just enjoy that because my husband was recently diagnosed with one? Well, you never know what detail might just be interesting.

It is still worthwhile reading the book for the general view of human development and the reminder that we should try to keep to our sense of wonder about the world. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Oct 23, 2020 |
It was ok...interesting but could have been an article rather than a book. ( )
  baruthcook | Aug 26, 2020 |
Shubin's engaging book reveals our fishy origins (for which we can thank hiccupping and hernias) and shows how life on Earth is profoundly interrelated. A book after Darwin's heart.
hinzugefügt von waitingtoderail | bearbeitenThe Guardian, PD Smith (Jan 31, 2009)
 
Shubin connects with sections on his own work discovering fossils, and on the sometimes surprising roots of modern human complaints. But the paleontologist can't escape his own academic history — much of Your Inner Fish reads like a cross between fleshed-out lecture notes and a dummed-down textbook.
 
Your Inner Fish combines Shubin's and others' discoveries to present a twenty-first-century anatomy lesson. The simple, passionate writing may turn more than a few high-school students into aspiring biologists.
hinzugefügt von jlelliott | bearbeitenNature, Carl Zimmer (bezahlte Seite) (Jan 17, 2008)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (3 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Shubin, NeilHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Barth, BrianUmschlaggestalterCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Cashman, MarcErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Monoyios, KalliopiIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Nieuwstadt, Mark vanÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
To Michele
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Typical summers of my adult life are spent in snow and sleet, cracking rocks on cliffs well north of the Arctic Circle.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC
KNO: Der Mensch ist ein Tier unter Tieren, Ergebnis einer Milliarde Jahre dauernden Evolution. Spuren und Reste dieser Entwicklung sind in unserem Körper aufbewahrt, in der Form unserer Knochen, der Struktur unserer DNA. Ein ganzer Zweig des Baum des Lebens ist tief in uns eingelassen KNO: Der Mensch ist ein Tier unter Tieren, Ergebnis einer Milliarde Jahre dauernden Evolution. Spuren und Reste dieser Entwicklung sind in unserem Körper aufbewahrt, in der Form unserer Knochen, der Struktur unserer DNA. Ein ganzer Zweig des Baum des Lebens ist tief in uns eingelassen.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Genres

Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

611 — Technology and Application of Knowledge Medicine and health Anatomy

Klassifikation der Library of Congress [LCC] (USA)

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.93)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 20
2.5 2
3 91
3.5 37
4 199
4.5 26
5 114

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 166,168,245 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar