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Über den Schmerz (1940)

von C. S. Lewis

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

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7,32653923 (3.95)73
Why must humanity suffer? In this elegant and thoughtful work, C. S. Lewis questions the pain and suffering that occur everyday and how they contrast with the notion of a God that is both omnipotent and good'the answer to this critical theological problem is within these pages.
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Pain and evil seem to be out of place in a universe created by an omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent, loving and just God. Lewis does an excellent job of examining this question in a comprehensible way. ( )
  MarcHutchison | Jul 11, 2021 |
I literally finished this book a second time and picked it back up a week later and started reading it a third time. ( )
  Shockleyy | Jun 6, 2021 |
Em O Problema do Sofrimento, o maior pensador cristão de nosso tempo trouxe à luz a complicada discussão sobre um dos temas mais difíceis do cristianismo - O Sofrimento. Nos tempos de aflição, muitas são as perguntas que angustiam as pessoas em todo o mundo:
• Por que sofremos?
• Se Deus é bom e todo-poderoso, por que permite que suas criaturas sofram?
• A aflição faz parte do plano divino para nosso aperfeiçoamento ou é simplesmente um capricho dele?
A leitura deste clássico ajudará você a manter uma postura adequada nos momentos de dor. A riqueza verdadeira dos filhos de Deus está em outro mundo e o único tesouro real é a presença inefável de Cristo.
  Jonatas.Bakas | Apr 25, 2021 |
In this book, C.S. Lewis addresses the problem of evil: if God is good and all-powerful, why is there suffering? His answer to this is dense and philosophical. Before he starts his main argument however, he says that this “problem” is peculiar to Christianity - if you are an atheist, the “evil” you might see in the universe is really just an “is” which suggests no “ought.” So really, it’s only when you have already accepted the central tenets of Christianity that this even becomes a “problem” at all. (Interestingly, although not really its purpose, his discussion amounts to a rejection of the intelligent design argument. He does not think that anyone could look at the universe as it is, and infer a loving, good, all-powerful God from it.)

He begins his proper argument by asserting that a universe without suffering is a logical absurdity — you might as well ask if God could have made a universe in which squares were round. As far as I can understand, the idea is that in order for consciousnesses to interact with each other, there must be a neutral “field” in which this occurs — and its neutrality (i.e., not malleable to one’s every whim) necessitates the potential for pain. This is a weird argument, and I get the sense that Lewis feels awkward making it, but in the end it works, I think.

Next, he suggests that the mistake in the objection is that, when it comes to talking about God, we generally equate goodness with kindness — easing suffering. He argues, rather, that God’s love is such that requires pain on our part, and that this is ultimately a good thing, due to our fallen state. The first chapter called “Human Pain” is one of the clearest, most uncompromising and straightforward articulations of the Christian doctrine of man’s relationship to God that I’ve ever read. This is no namby-pamby feel-good Christian fluff, despite how Lewis’s books are marketed these days. This is hardcore.

He ends with a discussion about Hell, and here I think he slips a little bit on his conception of free will (which clashes somewhat with his discussion of man’s fallenness elsewhere, and I think is a sticky point for Lewis in general). His chapter on animal pain is interesting, in that even though he doesn’t see animals as conscious beings capable of “real” (i.e., human-like) suffering, he finds a place for our sympathy toward them and our desire that they would be in heaven.

Overall this book provides a lucid and striking discussion of ideas that would seem counterintuitive at first glance (and indeed have troubled philosophers throughout the ages). Lewis’s talent is in explaining them in such a way that they became so clear I wondered why I hadn’t thought of them myself already. ( )
  exhypothesi | Mar 7, 2021 |
I always enjoy reading CS Lewis, even if I'm not exactly the intended audience anymore. This is again, another good thesis/essay by Clive, but for some reason, this seems far more jargon-y and not really getting down to the "brass tax" of what its supposed to be about. Seems like he doesn't truly tackle and go on about the true "problem of pain" and its more or less a work-around to discuss what he wants to talk about with regards to Christianity and man's view and take on it.

The chapters are also broken down into weird ways and the long (3 page paragraphs!) paragraphs and writing style compared to some of his other essays makes this wordier and with much more filler than need be and previously done.

I have to say I wish there was a fair bit more 'meat' on it, and would also wish there was tackling of this from an atheistic perspective (obviously I know going in, I wouldn't be getting that perspective from Lewis). ( )
  BenKline | Jul 1, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (3 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Lewis, C. S.AutorHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
Havard, R.NachwortCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Pesonen, MarittaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Simmons, JamesReaderCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Whitfield, RobertErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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'The Son of God suffered unto the death, not that men might not suffer, but that their sufferings might be like His.'
— George MacDonald,
Unspoken Sermons, First Series
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Not many years ago when I was an atheist, if anyone had asked me, "Why do you not believe in God?" my reply would have run something like this: "Look at the universe we live in.
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Why must humanity suffer? In this elegant and thoughtful work, C. S. Lewis questions the pain and suffering that occur everyday and how they contrast with the notion of a God that is both omnipotent and good'the answer to this critical theological problem is within these pages.

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