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Die Shannara-Chroniken – Das Schwert der Elfen (1977)

von Terry Brooks

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

Reihen: Shannara (1), Schwert von Shannara-Trilogie (1), Shannara-Zyklus (Omnibus 1-3 - [Buch I]), Shannara Universe: Chronological (10)

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6,9471041,059 (3.48)167
From master fantasy writer Terry Brooks comes the first book in the famed Shannara trilogy. Living in peaceful Shady Vale, Shea Ohmsford knew little of the troubles that plagued the rest of the world. Then the giant, forbidding Allanon revealed that the supposedly dead Warlock Lord was plotting to destroy the world. The sole weapon against this Power of Darkness was the Sword of Shannara, which could only be used by a true heir of Shannara - Shea being the last of the bloodline, upon whom all hope rested. Soon a Skull Bearer, dread minion of Evil, flew into the Vale, seeking to destroy Shea. To save the Vale, Shea fled, drawing the Skull Bearer after him.… (mehr)
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I know when I started this book that I was in for some spic adventire and it did not disappoint. In a way it sort of reminded me of Lord of The Rings considering that Brooks was inspired by Tolkien it makes sense. A Half Man/ Half Elf is burdened with a quest that only he can do to defeat the big bad. He is accompanied by a Wizard (or a Druid in this case) and several others including a bad ass Dwarf, who ended up being my favorite character.

There were two big gripes I had about this book. One was the long monologues about the History. It just seemed to go on and on and on. I understand that Brooks was trying to do he wanted the reader to have the entire backstory so there would be no questions, but man was it just so hard to get through all that reading!

The second problem I had was the major lack of females in this story. One does not even show up until the last half of the book. I'm not saying that there had to be a major female character (although that would have been awesome) but at least a couple of appearance would have sufficed.

Despite these two things the book was okay. Not the absolute best fantasy I have read and not the worst either. I am going to read The Elfstones of Shannara because I would like to compare it to the show when I watch it. ( )
  Lattes_Literature | Dec 23, 2021 |
This book wears its influence on its sleeve. If you're looking for something Tolkien-esque, there are certainly direct analogues to Frodo, Gandalf, Sauron, Gollum, the one ring, the Nazgul, and the evil hordes of The Lord of the Rings; but the prose and the worldbuilding aren't nearly up to the same standard. There's not much original material (at least, little that receives any narrative focus), with one exception: Brooks' depiction of fantasy race is somewhat more complex than Tolkien's (admittedly a low bar). While the good race/evil race dichotomy is preserved, there are exceptions to the rule for both of the "evil" races, include one character who is an important part of the plot and treated as generally heroic. Not exactly groundbreaking or even progressive stuff, but certainly an improvement.
One of the odd things about this book is that the obstacles the characters face are almost always solved in uninteresting ways: the characters notice something they didn't before, or are rescued by someone else, or make an unremarkable plan to distract the enemy. The obstacles themselves usually come from the characters failing to notice something, or being deceived by their enemies. There is no character arc or thematically cohesive plot--just a series of fights, puzzles, and traps that eventually leads to getting the artifact and defeating the dark lord. In other words, it reads exactly like someone transcribed their Dungeons & Dragons campaign and turned it into a book. Originating as a role-playing game would certainly explain why the plot is so episodic, and the characters are so flat and archetypal--what's interesting to players of a game is completely different from what's interesting to readers of a book. I would say that modern Tolkien-esque fantasy tabletop games, if not directly influencing (or being influenced by) the Shannara books, at the very least come from a similar emotional place: the desire to live in Tolkien's world and experience an epic, world-changing quest of one's own. In satisfying that kind of desire, originality and cohesiveness are less important than a sense of nostalgia and identification with the characters. I understand why some people might like it; but ultimately, I just don't think a book is the best medium for this kind of story. ( )
  Sammelsurium | Nov 17, 2021 |
This story is not badly written…it's just, as a Tolkien knockoff, it's kind of weak. The Gandolf character is not at all sympathetic; and the two human versions of hobbits are not very convincing. In this tale, it's a magic, invincible sword that controls the outcome. With Greg Bear I am willing to tolerate a weak/slow beginning because I trust him to follow up with something worth the wait. But this book is just too weak/slow and not convincing. I suppose my primary poor opinion is based upon the continuous obvious comparison with the Lord of the Rings…if the story for the first 70 pages wasn’t so similar to Tolkien I might have given it more time to unfold, but even then, I couldn’t see it going anywhere but where Tolkien has already been. ( )
  majackson | Sep 24, 2021 |
Picked this up for my personal challenge of reading older fantasy.

I enjoyed this read, although it took me time to get through it. The first couple hundred pages gave me the inkling it was going to be a re-hash of Lord of The Rings. In way it was. We have the coming together of the different races to fight the evil. We have a sword instead of a ring. However Terry Brooks writing style captivated me and I plugged along and began enjoying the characters and the action and stopped comparing them to Tolkien. Brooks can write battle scenes with gusto-for sure.

All in all a great escape, Epic fantasy, and I will continue the series ( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
The Sword of Shannara was also the first of the high fantasy best-sellers, and since I’m in the middle of a (partial) reread of the Wheel of Time series, I thought it might be worth seeing what this novel was like. I shouldn’t have bothered. It’s fucking dreadful. A “Valeman” on his way home one night is scared by some giant flappy thing in the sky, and then waylaid by a scary man over seven foot tall with a goatee. Except the scary man is well-known to the Valemen (they live in a vale, see), although he is very mysterious. Cue info-dump. The Valeman’s adopted brother is half-elvish, and is actually the only surviving relative of an ancient elvish king. Because of this, he’s the only person who can wield the Sword of Shannara, an ancient, er, sword, and defeat the Warlock Lord, an evil sorcerer who is about to invade the Four Lands and kill everyone. Or maybe just enslave them. It’s not clear. There’s the good guys – one of which is a dwarf, and another is Boromir in all but name – and they have to make their way to Druid’s Keep to retrieve the sword before the evil gnome army. But the gnomes get there first, and Shea (the naming is absolutely terrible in this book), the half-elf half-not-a-hobbit-honestly, is separated from the others and ends up travelling into absolutely-not-Mordor chasing after the titular sword. Meanwhile, the others are involved in defending Tyrsis – which is definitely not Minas Tirith – against a huge army of gnomes and rock trolls… This was the first of the big-selling Tolkien rip-offs, and I can’t honestly see what its appeal is. Did people just want another LotR with the serial numbers filed off? And were they so desperate for it, they’d accept this sub-literate crap? Even now, fantasy fans still recommend this book – and then they do that thing, which is absolutely fucking stupid, of explaining that the first few books are not very good but “it gets a lot better around book four or five”. Seriously, fuck off. I’m not going to read half a dozen shit 700-page novels to reach one which is “better”, especially since as a fan of the series, the person recommending it clearly has no idea what a good book actually is. Books like this should no longer be in print. They do the genre a disservice, they do its readers a disservice. ( )
1 abstimmen iansales | Apr 15, 2021 |
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» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (47 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Terry BrooksHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Brick, ScottErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hildebrandt, GregIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hildebrandt, GregUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hildebrandt, TimIllustratorCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Hildebrandt, TimUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stefani, SilviaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stefani, SilviaÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Stone, SteveUmschlagillustrationCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Westermayr, TonyÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Die Sonne sank schon ins grüne Dunkel der Hügel westlich des Tals, und das Rot und Grau-Rosa der Schatten berührte das Land, als Flick Ohmsford mit dem Abstieg begann.
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Die ist die Ausgabe, die das komplette The Sword of Shannara enthält. Nicht kombinieren mit dem gleichnamigen Werk, das nur den ersten von drei Teilen enthält, in die The Sword of Shannara für die erste deutschsprachige Ausgabe aufgeteilt wurde.
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Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

From master fantasy writer Terry Brooks comes the first book in the famed Shannara trilogy. Living in peaceful Shady Vale, Shea Ohmsford knew little of the troubles that plagued the rest of the world. Then the giant, forbidding Allanon revealed that the supposedly dead Warlock Lord was plotting to destroy the world. The sole weapon against this Power of Darkness was the Sword of Shannara, which could only be used by a true heir of Shannara - Shea being the last of the bloodline, upon whom all hope rested. Soon a Skull Bearer, dread minion of Evil, flew into the Vale, seeking to destroy Shea. To save the Vale, Shea fled, drawing the Skull Bearer after him.

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Buchbeschreibung
Der erste Band schildert den Kampf des jungen Shea, letzter Sproß des sagenhaften Königs von Shannara, gegen den Lord der Zauberer, der aus dem Nordland in die friedlichen Länder der Menschen, Elfen und Zwerge einzufallen droht...
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Durchschnitt: (3.48)
0.5 11
1 76
1.5 13
2 151
2.5 33
3 318
3.5 68
4 385
4.5 16
5 292

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