StartseiteGruppenForumMehrZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Soldaten von Salamis (2001)

von Javier Cercas

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
1,1374113,364 (3.73)119
A compulsively readable and immensely moving 'true tale' of fiction
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Englisch (23)  Spanisch (6)  Italienisch (4)  Katalanisch (3)  Französisch (2)  Dänisch (1)  Niederländisch (1)  Deutsch (1)  Alle Sprachen (41)
Nach Jahren laß ich es wieder. Ich erinnerte mich nur noch daran, dass die Erzählung sich um einen Augenblick – im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes – im Spanischen Bürgerkrieg drehte. Die Struktur ist ungewöhnlich und ähnelt dem eines Dramas: Ein Vorspiel in der Gegenwart, der Hauptteil in der Vergangenheit vor 60 Jahren, ein Nachspiel wieder in der Gegenwart. Die Sprache gefällt manchmal, manchmal auch nicht: vielleicht liegt es an der Übersetzung, aber ich bezweifle es. Die Personen haben gelebt, manche vielleicht auch nicht, sind erfunden oder auch nicht: es ist nicht eigentlich wichtig. Von den abgedruckten Lobpreisungen gefällt mir Susan Sontags wenn sie schreibt: „J.C. engages in a quick-witted, tender quest for truth and the possibility of reconciliation in history, in our every-day lifes.“ (XII-16) ( )
  MeisterPfriem | Dec 19, 2016 |
The Spanish civil war is staggering to its inevitable conclusion. After the fall of Barcelona, the remnants of the Republican army flee towards the French border. An order comes for them to execute their nationalist prisoners, among them Sanchez Mazas, one of the ideologues whose inflamed rhetoric brought catastrophe to Spain in the first place.

Some 50 of the prisoners are lined up. Mazas hears the shots but, realising he has only been wounded, escapes into the woods. He is discovered by a republican militiaman, who stares him in the face, and then spares his life, shouting to his companions that there is no one there. For several days, the Falange leader hides out in the forests, helped by some deserters from the Republican side, and then is rescued by Franco's troops. He is received as a hero, and feted throughout the newly nationalist country.

He is made a minister in the first Franco government, but quickly becomes disillusioned with the grubbiness of everyday politics, so far from his early high poetic ideals. He inherits money, and lives out his days as a frustrated writer, pursued by dreams of glory and heroism, so lacking in his own life.

Mazas's story is the central panel of Javier Cercas's tryptich. In the first part, we meet the narrator, also called "Javier Cercas", who disarmingly admits from the start that he is a failure as husband and writer. He hears of the story of Sanchez Mazas from the Falangist's son, and the fact that he has just lost his own father sets him on a journey to rescue the forgotten writer from oblivion, in the hope that he might also rescue his own career.

The narrator is fascinated by the way memory congeals into history: the insidious process by which personal narratives become part of a past that can no longer be verified, and is therefore taken to be the truth, even though it is only one possible version of what actually happened. As Cercas points out, the events of the Spanish civil war, which took place only a generation earlier, are becoming as distant and fixed as the story of the soldiers who fought the Persian fleet at Salamis more than 2,000 years earlier.

The narrator is at pains to stress that he is telling a "true story". But from the very outset of Soldiers of Salamis it is plain that this is a literary quest, the hope being that the fictional invention will be more convincing in the end than any biographical memoir. A vital part of the attempt to keep the past as living memory rather than dead history is to investigate individual motives, and the story of Mazas revolves around a central question: what exactly makes a hero? Is it someone like Mazas, who proclaims the glory of violence and the need for radical change, but never actually fights for it; or is heroism something different entirely?

Cercas's response comes in the third section of the novel. This is an account of how the narrator manages to track down the person who might have been the republican militiaman who spared Mazas's life. This man, Antoni Miralles, will not say straight out whether he was the man or not. But talking to him in an old people's home on the outskirts of Dijon, in France, the narrator becomes convinced he is the real hero, "someone who has courage and an instinct for virtue, and therefore never makes a mistake, or at least doesn't make a mistake the one time when it matters, and therefore can't not be a hero".

The book ends with the narrator triumphantly certain that, whether or not Miralles was the man in question, on the level of his own fiction he is the perfect fit to help "complete the mechanism" of his book, and in so doing rescue from oblivion all the "soldiers of Salamis" - the warriors who were heroes despite knowing they were fighting an already lost cause.

Cercas's book has created a sensation in Spain. Whereas in Britain it is easy enough to know who the heroes were - the ones who fought and defeated fascism - the situation in Spain is very different. Not only was the country split in two during the civil war, but there followed 40 years of rule by one side that sought to deny any virtues to its adversaries. As Cercas tells us, "there is a monument to the war dead in every town in Spain. How many have you seen with, at the very least, the names of the fallen from both sides?"

Yet at the same time, Franco and his supporters "won the war but lost the history of literature". Internationally, it is the republicans who are seen as heroes, whether the writer is Hemingway, Orwell or André Malraux. In the end, Soldiers of Salamis remains firmly in this tradition, while offering a gentle and often moving reassertion that individual lives and actions matter most, however overwhelming the historical circumstances may seem.

Nick Caistor is the translator of Juan MarsË's Lizard Tails.
hinzugefügt von thegeneral | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Nick Caistor (Jun 21, 2003)
 
Este libro, que se jacta tanto de no fantasear, de ceñirse a lo estrictamente comprobado, en verdad transpira literatura por todos sus poros. Los literatos ocupan en él un puesto clave, aunque no figuren en el libro como literatos, sino en forma de circunstanciales peones que, de manera casual, disparan en la mente del narrador la idea de contar esta historia, de hacerla avanzar, o la manera de cerrarla. La inicia Sánchez Ferlosio, revelándole el episodio del fusilamiento de su padre, y, cuando está detenida y a punto de naufragar, la relanza Roberto Bolaño, hablando a Javier Cercas del fabuloso Antoni Miralles, en quien aquél cree identificar, por un pálpito que todo su talento narrativo está a punto de convertir en verdad fehaciente en las últimas páginas del libro, al miliciano anónimo que perdonó la vida a Sánchez Mazas. Este dato escondido queda allí, flotando en el vacío, a ver si el lector se atreve a ir más allá de lo que fue el narrador, y decide que, efectivamente, la milagrosa coincidencia tuvo lugar, y fue Miralles, combatiente de mil batallas, miliciano republicano en España, héroe anónimo de la columna Leclerc en los desiertos africanos y compañero de la liberación en Francia, el oscuro soldadito que, en un gesto de humanidad, salvó la vida al señorito escribidor falangista convencido de que, a lo largo de la historia, siempre un pelotón de soldados 'había salvado la civilización'.
hinzugefügt von Alguien | bearbeitenEl País, Mario Vargas Llosa (Sep 3, 2001)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (23 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Javier CercasHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Carelli, WagnerÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
סערי, רמיÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Zugehörige Filme
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
'The gods desire to keep the stuff of life Hidden from us', Hesiod, 'Works and days'.
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
For Raül Cercas and Mercè Mas
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
It was the summer of 1994, more than six years ago now, when I first heard about Rafael Sánchez Mazas facing the firing squad.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (1)

A compulsively readable and immensely moving 'true tale' of fiction

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.73)
0.5 1
1 2
1.5
2 16
2.5 6
3 50
3.5 28
4 89
4.5 19
5 37

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 163,161,295 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar