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American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White…
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American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House (2008. Auflage)

von Jon Meacham

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
2,667634,223 (3.71)95
A thought-provoking study of Andrew Jackson chronicles the life and career of a self-made man who went on to become a military hero and seventh president of the United States, critically analyzing Jackson's seminal role during a turbulent era in history, the political crises and personal upheaval that surrounded him, and his legacy for the modern presidency.… (mehr)
Mitglied:Alloc
Titel:American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House
Autoren:Jon Meacham
Info:Random House (2008), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 512 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:****
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American Lion von Jon Meacham

Kürzlich hinzugefügt vontrishrobertsmiller, private Bibliothek, aprilhill, erohwedd, reelbigschmidt, IlliniDave, jeremyjsnow, derwerff
NachlassbibliothekenTim Spalding
  1. 00
    Stolen Continents: The Americas through Indian Eyes since 1492 von Ronald Wright (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: What you can you say about a man who appears on the twenty dollar bill? From another author’s opinion:

      In 1813 several hundred Cherokees enlisted under the command of a bush lawyer turned general, Andrew Jackson. Old Hickory, as he became known for his intractable personality, was forty-six, gaunt, shrewd, violent, one arm crippled by dueling wounds—the latest from a duel with his own brother. Of Carolina frontier stock, he hated Indians but was more than willing to employ them as high-grade cannon fodder. His Creek War, hailed by Jackson as a victory for civilization, was notorious for the savagery of white troops under his command. They skinned dead Creeks for belt leather; and Davy Crockett, who was there, told how a platoon set fire to a house with “forty-six warriors in it” and afterward ate potatoes from the cellar basted in human fat.

      The decisive victory came in March 1814 at Horseshoe Bend, fifty miles northeast of Montgomery, Alabama. In this action, a Cherokee chief named Junaluska saved Andrew Jackson’s life. This didn’t stop Old Hickory from winking while his Tennessee troops shot livestock and terrorized civilians for amusement on their way home through the Cherokee Nation. And in the vindictive peace treaty by which he dispossessed all the Creeks—friends as well as foes—Jackson took more than 2 million acres in northern Alabama that belonged to the Cherokees. No sentimental obligation would stop him from opening the country for settlers from Tennessee to the Gulf.

      The Cherokees were now encircled, and Andrew Jackson would devote the next twenty years to getting rid of them.

        I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just.

                                                               — Thomas Jefferson, 1784

        I never apologize for the United States of America. I don’t care what the facts are.

                                                               — George [H. W.] Bush, 1988

      Among those who fought as officers in Jackson’s army were Kahnungdatlageh, He-Who-Walks-on-the-Mountaintop, known in English as Major Ridge, and Kooweskoowee, or John Ross, who had more Scots blood than Cherokee in his veins but was deeply loyal to the Nation. Unlike the generation before them, these men achieved a synthesis of Cherokee identity and cultural change. Their solution was nationalism, the creation of a Cherokee polity with a written constitution that would enshrine the ancient sense of kinship with the land and transform ethnic ties into a sovereign republic like the one the Americans were building around them.
    … (mehr)
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As boring as a pile of poop. The Eaton affair almost made me puke.

Stick to your weekly editor, Meacham. ( )
  Gadi_Cohen | Sep 22, 2021 |
This is a focused look at Jackson’s time as President and the author states that it is not meant to be an exhaustive scholarly work. I found that the somewhat casual tone worked most of the time although there were some spots that felt too gossipy for me. I was mostly unaware of how much he fought to hold the Union together in the 1830s and that part resonated with me for today. He was eloquent in his view that you change things through the great methods we have, you don’t just quit and leave the Union. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
Rather than read another Trump tell-all book, I turned to another populist, Andrew Jackson. In Jon Meacham's telling he's more patrician than vulgarian. There's behind-the-curtain fluff driving the action here too, though, including his loyalty to John Eaton, his secretary of war, and Eaton's wife, who was a bit too frank and flirtatious for Washington in 1829. Jackson's distrust of central power seems equal parts conviction and political grudge, which makes his efforts to drain the swamp appear only somewhat more admirable than Trump's. And his convictions aren't always admirable; Old Hickory battled Native Americans in the War of 1812 and as president wanted them removed as a security threat. Yet he turned back Southern secession, earning the admiration of Lincoln and many presidents that followed. History, like its actors, is complicated.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
I enjoyed this book very much and Meacham's approach to the story. I'm surprised so many people criticized it for not being a traditional sequential analysis of his entire life but instead focused on those experiences and issues which the author determined to be most relevant and interesting. ( )
  hvector | Jul 10, 2021 |
Focused on his time in the white house and the major life events that shaped him leading up to his two terms in office, this book was an unflinching portrait of a not always admirable democrat but a pivotal President. Jackson brought a warriors mindset to the office of the President and fought to keep the union together as the conflict over slavery and states rights flared up. Jackson and his wife Rachel (who died right before he took office) had no children of their own but family and loyalty was very important to him and these relationships, thought sometimes opposed to each other, played an important part in his life as well. Meacham's writing brings the world around Jackson into focus, his toughness, his under appreciated political skills, his rise from Revolutionary War orphan to President of the young United States, a country full of promise but still finding its way. Jackson was a champion of "the people" over the privileged few, while also a slave owner and the architect of the removal of Indians from their land, and his work to keep the union together went a long way to shaping the views of the people who came after him.
( )
  SteveKey | Jan 8, 2021 |
“American Lion” is enormously entertaining, especially in the deft descriptions of Jackson’s personality and domestic life in his White House. But Meacham has missed an opportunity to reflect on the nature of American populism as personified by Jackson.
 
Mr. Meacham, the editor of Newsweek, dispenses with the usual view of Jackson as a Tennessee hothead and instead sees a cannily ambitious figure determined to reshape the power of the presidency during his time in office (1829 to 1837). Case by case, Mr. Meacham dissects Jackson’s battles and reinterprets them in a revealing new light.
hinzugefügt von Shortride | bearbeitenThe New York Times, Janet Maslin (Nov 10, 2008)
 
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The darker the night the bolder the sun.
- Theodore Roosevelt,
Life Histories of African Game Animals

I was born for a storm and a calm does not suit me.
- Andrew Jackson
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To Mary, Maggie, and Sam
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A thought-provoking study of Andrew Jackson chronicles the life and career of a self-made man who went on to become a military hero and seventh president of the United States, critically analyzing Jackson's seminal role during a turbulent era in history, the political crises and personal upheaval that surrounded him, and his legacy for the modern presidency.

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