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The Prophet (Kahlil Gibran Pocket Library)…
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The Prophet (Kahlil Gibran Pocket Library) (Original 1923; 1966. Auflage)

von Kahlil Gibran

Reihen: The Prophet (1)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
12,220149403 (4.11)130
Der faszinierende Klassiker der spirituellen Literatur. - Eine Stadt im Orient: Der Prophet al-Mustafa erwartet das Schiff, das ihn in seine Heimat zurückbringen wird. Bevor er sie verlässt, bitten ihn die Einwohner von Orfalîs, ein letztes Mal zu ihnen zu sprechen: von Liebe, Schmerz, Schönheit, Freude und allem anderen, was die Menschen bewegt. Die Antworten des Propheten sind voller Lebensweisheit und mystischer Tiefe und zählen zum Faszinierendsten, was die spirituelle Literatur hervorgebracht hat. Khalil Gibran gelang mit diesem Werk der Brückenschlag zwischen der Alten und Neuen Welt, zwischen Orient und Okzident, Islam und Christentum. 1923 erschienen, erlebte "Der Prophet" einen beispiellosen Triumphzug im Westen und hat bis heute nichts von seiner Anziehungskraft verloren. Der bekannte und einflussreiche deutsche Songwriter und Musikmoderator Tex interpretiert diesen Klassiker neu in einer einzigartigen Mischung aus Lesung, Musik und Songs… (mehr)
Mitglied:jaggedhorizon
Titel:The Prophet (Kahlil Gibran Pocket Library)
Autoren:Kahlil Gibran
Info:Knopf (1966), Edition: Pocket, Hardcover
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:poetry, spiritual, long-time-favorites

Werk-Informationen

Der Prophet von Kahlil Gibran (1923)

  1. 53
    Tao te king von Lao Tzu (Othemts)
  2. 10
    Four Quartets von T. S. Eliot (kara.shamy)
  3. 10
    Im Garten des Propheten. von Kahlil Gibran (Michael.Rimmer)
  4. 00
    A Flight of Swans: Poems from Balākā von Rabindranath Tagore (Michael.Rimmer)
  5. 00
    Das unbeschriebene Blatt von Steven Pinker (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: God, Jesus, Virgin Mary, Yahweh, Allah, Mohammed, Shiva, Buddha, Zeus, Odin, Horus, Emperor of Heaven, Haile Selassie, Great Spirit, Spider Grandmother, Flying Spaghetti Monster—take a lesson:


    MOST PEOPLE ARE familiar with the idea that some of our ordeals come from a mismatch between the source of our passions in evolutionary history and the goals we set for ourselves today. People gorge themselves in anticipation of a famine that never comes, engage in dangerous liaisons that conceive babies they don’t want, and rev up their bodies in response to stressors from which they cannot run away.

    What is true for the emotions may also be true for the intellect. Some of our perplexities may come from a mismatch between the purposes for which our cognitive faculties evolved and the purposes to which we put them today. This is obvious enough when it comes to raw data processing. People do not try to multiply six-digit numbers in their heads or remember the phone number of everyone they meet, because they know their minds were not designed for the job. But it is not as obvious when it comes to the way we conceptualize the world. Our minds keep us in touch with aspects of reality—such as objects, animals, and people—that our ancestors dealt with for millions of years. But as science and technology open up new and hidden worlds, our untutored intuitions may find themselves at sea.

    What are these intuitions? Many cognitive scientists believe that human reasoning is not accomplished by a single, general-purpose computer in the head. The world is a heterogeneous place, and we are equipped with different kinds of intuitions and logics, each appropriate to one department of reality. These ways of knowing have been called systems, modules, stances, faculties, mental organs, multiple intelligences, and reasoning engines. They emerge early in life, are present in every normal person, and appear to be computed in partly distinct sets of networks in the brain. They may be installed by different combinations of genes, or they may emerge when brain tissue self-organizes in response to different problems to be solved and different patterns in the sensory input. Most likely they develop by some combination of these forces.

    What makes our reasoning faculties different from the departments in a university is that they are not just broad areas of knowledge, analyzed with whatever tools work best. Each faculty is based on a core intuition that was suitable for analyzing the world in which we evolved. Though cognitive scientists have not agreed on a Gray’s Anatomy of the mind, here is a tentative but defensible list of cognitive faculties and the core intuitions on which they are based:
    • An intuitive physics, which we use to keep track of how objects fall, bounce, and bend. Its core intuition is the concept of the object, which occupies one place, exists for a continuous span of time, and follows laws of motion and force. These are not Newton’s laws but something closer to the medieval conception of impetus, an “oomph” that keeps an object in motion and gradually dissipates.
    • An intuitive version of biology or natural history, which we use to understand the living world. Its core intuition is that living things house a hidden essence that gives them their form and powers and drives their growth and bodily functions.
    • An intuitive engineering, which we use to make and understand tools and other artifacts. Its core intuition is that a tool is an object with a purpose—an object designed by a person to achieve a goal.
    • An intuitive psychology, which we use to understand other people. Its core intuition is that other people are not objects or machines but are animated by the invisible entity we call the mind or the soul. Minds contain beliefs and desires and are the immediate cause of behavior.
    • A spatial sense, which we use to navigate the world and keep track of where things are. It is based on a dead reckoner, which updates coordinates of the body's location as it moves and turns, and a network of mental maps. Each map is organized by a different reference frame: the eyes, the head, the body, or salient objects and places in the world.
    • A number sense, which we use to think about quantities and amounts. It is based on an ability to register exact quantities for small numbers of objects (one, two, and three) and to make rough relative estimates for larger numbers.
    • A sense of probability, which we use to reason about the likelihood of uncertain events. It is based on the ability to track the relative frequencies of events, that is, the proportion of events of some kind that turn out one way or the other.
    • An intuitive economics, which we use to exchange goods and favors. It is based on the concept of reciprocal exchange, in which one party confers a benefit on another and is entitled to an equivalent benefit in return.
    • A mental database and logic, which we use to represent ideas and to infer new ideas from old ones. It is based on assertions about what’s what, what’s where, or who did what to whom, when, where, and why. The assertions are linked in a mind-wide web and can be recombined with logical and causal operators such as AND, OR, NOT, ALL, SOME, NECESSARY, POSSIBLE, and CAUSE.
    • Language, which we use to share the ideas from our mental logic. It is based on a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of combinatorial rules. The rules organize vowels and consonants into words, words into bigger words and phrases, and phrases into sentences, in such a way that the meaning of the combination can be computed from the meanings of the parts and the way they are arranged.
    The mind also has components for which it is hard to tell where cognition leaves off and emotion begins. These include a system for assessing danger, coupled with the emotion called fear, a system for assessing contamination, coupled with the emotion called disgust, and a moral sense, which is complex enough to deserve a chapter of its own.

    These ways of knowing and core intuitions are suitable for the lifestyle of small groups of illiterate, stateless people who live off the land, survive by their wits, and depend on what they can carry. Our ancestors left this lifestyle for a settled existence only a few millennia ago, too recently for evolution to have done much, if anything, to our brains. Conspicuous by their absence are faculties suited to the stunning new understanding of the world wrought by science and technology. For many domains of knowledge, the mind could not have evolved dedicated machinery, the brain and genome show no hints of specialization, and people show no spontaneous intuitive understanding either in the crib or afterward. They include modern physics, cosmology, genetics, evolution, neuroscience, embryology, economics, and mathematics.

    It’s not just that we have to go to school or read books to learn these subjects. It’s that we have no mental tools to grasp them intuitively. We depend on analogies that press an old mental faculty into service, or on jerry-built mental contraptions that wire together bits and pieces of other faculties. Understanding in these domains is likely to be uneven, shallow, and contaminated by primitive intuitions. And that can shape debates in the border disputes in which science and technology make contact with everyday life. The point … is that together with all the moral, empirical, and political factors that go into these debates, we should add the cognitive factors: the way our minds naturally frame issues. Our own cognitive makeup is a missing piece of many puzzles, including education, bioethics, food safety, economics, and human understanding itself.
    … (mehr)
  6. 12
    The Seed von Fola (nadoosha_373)
  7. 01
    Also sprach Zarathustra von Friedrich Nietzsche (Sylak)
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I have no basis for this, but this work feels like the quasi-pantheistic, hyper-spiritual counterpart to Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. As such, I liked this one better for two reasons: it did not sound as if it had freshly escaped from r/atheism, and it was short, sweet, and to the point! ( )
  djlinick | Jan 15, 2022 |
رائع بحق ! ( )
  nonames | Jan 14, 2022 |
It's easy to take just a quick glance at this and think 'this person is speaking poetic nonsense in riddles' and dismiss it, =D But truly it IS quite clever. And there are lots of concepts worth ruminating on. It's short, but pretty dense, so it's a lot to take in at once. It might be a good one to read just a single small section before bed or something. ( )
  JorgeousJotts | Dec 3, 2021 |
I mean...it's fine. Too bland for my taste though. I've been carting this around for almost 20 years...I probably would have enjoyed it in high school. ( )
1 abstimmen LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
Immediately reading this one again! ( )
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (83 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Gibran, KahlilHauptautoralle Ausgabenbestätigt
McFarlane, RobertFotografCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Valckenier, LiesbethÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Verhulst, CarolusÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
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Widmung
Erste Worte
Al-Mustafa, der Auserwählte und der Geliebte, der seiner Zeit ein Morgenrot war, hatte zwölf Jahre lang in der Stadt Orfalîs auf die Rückkehr seines Schiffes gewartet, das ihn wieder zur Insel seiner Geburt bringen sollte.
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You have been told that, even like a chain, you are as weak as your weakest link.
This is but half the truth. You are also as strong as your strongest link.
To measure you by your smallest deed is to reckon the power of the ocean by the frailty of its foam.
And ever has it been that love knows not its own depth until the hour of desperation.
When love beckons to you, follow him, though his ways are hard and steep. And when his wings enfold you yield to him, though the sword hidden among his pinions may wound you. And when he speaks to you believe in him...
Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life's longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.
Letzte Worte
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Library of Congress please note: this is NOT a work written in Arabic and translated into English. It is a work written in English by a Lebanese poet.
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Der faszinierende Klassiker der spirituellen Literatur. - Eine Stadt im Orient: Der Prophet al-Mustafa erwartet das Schiff, das ihn in seine Heimat zurückbringen wird. Bevor er sie verlässt, bitten ihn die Einwohner von Orfalîs, ein letztes Mal zu ihnen zu sprechen: von Liebe, Schmerz, Schönheit, Freude und allem anderen, was die Menschen bewegt. Die Antworten des Propheten sind voller Lebensweisheit und mystischer Tiefe und zählen zum Faszinierendsten, was die spirituelle Literatur hervorgebracht hat. Khalil Gibran gelang mit diesem Werk der Brückenschlag zwischen der Alten und Neuen Welt, zwischen Orient und Okzident, Islam und Christentum. 1923 erschienen, erlebte "Der Prophet" einen beispiellosen Triumphzug im Westen und hat bis heute nichts von seiner Anziehungskraft verloren. Der bekannte und einflussreiche deutsche Songwriter und Musikmoderator Tex interpretiert diesen Klassiker neu in einer einzigartigen Mischung aus Lesung, Musik und Songs

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Durchschnitt: (4.11)
0.5 3
1 29
1.5 9
2 112
2.5 20
3 285
3.5 49
4 597
4.5 57
5 872

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Ausgaben: 0140194479, 0141187018, 0141194677

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