StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Generation X. Geschichten für eine immer schneller werdende Kultur. (1991)

von Douglas Coupland

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
5,055571,671 (3.68)110
Die Handlung dieses bereits 1992 in deutscher Sprache erschienenen Szeneromans (ID 46/92) ist schnell umrissen: 3 junge Aussteiger, die ihre "Mittzwanziger-Krise" gerade überstanden haben, lockern ihr recht eintöniges Leben in einer unbedeutenden Stadt mitten in der kalifornischen Wüste dadurch auf, daß sie sich gegenseitig "Gute-Nacht-Geschichten" erzählen. In diesen Geschichten, teils wahr, teils unwahr, teilen sie ihre Ansichten über Familie, Karriere, die amerikanische Konsum- und Yuppie-Gesellschaft, die Atombombe und anderes mit. Das mit comicartigen Zeichnungen und einem Glossar des "Twentysomething-Jargons" interessant aufgemachte Kultbuch bleibt seiner Zielgruppe, der Generation der zwischen 1960 und 1970 Geborenen, in Deutschland wohl wegen seiner ständigen Bezugnahme auf das amerikanische Lebensgefühl dieser "Generation X" weitgehend unverständlich. - Auch in dieser preisgünstigeren Ausgabe nur Großstadtbibliotheken empfohlen. (Jutta Olbrich) Der comicartig aufgelockerte Szeneroman porträtiert Jargon und Lebensgefühl der Mitt-Zwanziger-Generation in den USA. (Jutta Olbrich)… (mehr)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

I first read this book shortly after it came out and it started my love affair with Douglas Coupland. It wasn't until very recently that I reread it. I'd been afraid that it wouldn't have passed the test of time--that it would seem as dated as the movie Singles. Fortunately, I still found it to be quite enjoyable. However, what I've found over Douglas Coupland's career, is that I most enjoy his novels set in the Pacific Northwest. He writes of the environment with a greater sense of authority--no doubt from living his life in and around Vancouver. One of his greatest strengths, in my opinion, is capturing the "feel" of life in the PNW.
The three main characters in Generation X have turned away from the expected path of their peers, namely the acquisition of careers and material goods. They're looking for happiness and meaning in simpler ways and their jobs are simply a mean to an ends--their jobs aren't their lives, their jobs are simply something to keep food in their bellies and a roof over their heads while they look for real meaning elsewhere. Even now, almost 20 years after the novel was published, there's something beautiful about that idea. ( )
  ltrahms | Jul 13, 2021 |
I had the same problem with this book that I have with any book, piece of artwork, song, or movie that attempts to speak to and/or about my generation.

Part of the problem is the sheer weight of representation: in their attempts to wax philosophical on life and its accompanying angst, what most prominently stands out in the words of Claire, Dag and Andy is either the pretension that comes with making any grand gesture meant to stand for a collective consciousness or the disingenuous gravity that accompanies "Proclamations of the 'Truth'" (that's 'truthiness' to you Colbert fans).

Whenever I catch Juno or Empire Records or the like on television I get that same feeling - a sense of naughty delight at the winsome words coming off of the screen dampened by the realization that NO ONE REALLY TALKS LIKE THIS, and if they do, they are probably too caught up with their own words to really care to listen to anyone else's. Which is not to say that I'm a stickler for realism either, but in this book there is a clear line between the sad suck of reality and the semi-magical realism of the tales these three windbags tend to dream up, and the realism part just doesn't work.

But I'm being harsh. I have no problem with environmental and social responsibility, or a lessening of hyperconsumption in all its forms. And I admit, if I'd read this maybe 9 or 10 years ago I might've absolutely gobbled it up whole, but I find it all tiresome now. There is a lot that does ring true here, but the execution is sometimes taxing.

Maybe it is the author's intention that the characters just sound like a group of ungrateful, vacuous people taking up space, and if so then the job is done. Some parts of this genuinely made me laugh and some of the characterizations are done very well, but I have a hard time swallowing books that are filled with whining, particularly the kind of whining where there is a wink at how clever it all is to whine in such a way.

I also have a hard time with this notion that the answer is "out there," in some fading desert - a la Coehlo's The Alchemist (or, worse yet, in an underprivileged foreign country) just waiting for some 20-something lost American middle-class soul to pluck it from the ether. The act is seen here as courageous when it is really some imperialist orientalist romanticism that has more to do with avoiding answers than really finding them.

Not that I have any answers either, but still. ( )
  irrelephant | Feb 21, 2021 |
Buenos Aires - Abril/1994 ( )
  MOTORRINO | Dec 6, 2020 |
Nothing really happens in this novel, but maybe that's a metaphor for GenXers lives or at least the way they see their lives? I'm firmly in the middle of Gen X, being born in 1970, maybe this book would have resonated more for me when I picked it up 20+ years ago. I don't think so. These seemed like "normal" white kids from suburban households. I was raised in white suburbia, but I was a punk rocker and a metalhead, I never aspired to corporate dominance and never (to this day) worried about climbing the corporate ladder. I didn't worry about being "successful" in the traditional sense and I wasn't worried about my parents being disappointed in me, they never were.

Anyway, this was witty at times, included a bunch of short stories told by the characters, which is kind of a cool mechanic. I liked the little border notes. Really though it was kind of boring. ( )
  ragwaine | Mar 11, 2020 |
  obtusata | Jan 9, 2020 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (22 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Douglas CouplandHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Fastenau, JanÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Kuitenbrouwer, JanMitwirkenderCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt

Gehört zu Verlagsreihen

Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen sind von der niederländischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
"Her hair was totally 1950s Indina Woolworth perfume

clerk. You know-sweet and dumb-she'll marry her way

out of the trailer park some day soon. But the dress was

early '60s Aeroflot stewardess-you know-that really sad

blue the Russians used before they all started wanting to

buy Sonys and having Guy Laroche design their Politburo

caps. And such make-up! Perfect '70s Mary Quant, with

these little PVC floral appliqué earrings that looked like

antiskid bathtub stickers from a gay Hollywood tub circe

1956. She really caught the sadness-she was the hippest

person there. Totally."

TRACEY, 27
"They're my children. Adults or not, I just can't kick them

out of the house. It would be cruel. And besides-they're

great cooks."

HELEN, 52
Widmung
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Back in the late 1970s, when I was fifteen years old, I spent every penny I then had in the bank to fly across the continent in a 747 jet to Brandon, Manitoba, deep in the Canadian prairies, to witness a total eclipse of the sun.
Zitate
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
"You see, when you're middle class, you have to live with the fact that history will ignore you. You have to live with the fact that history will never champion your causes and that history will never feel sorry for you. It is the price paid for day-to-day comfort and silence. And because of this price, all happinesses are sterile; all sadnesses go unoticed. And any small moments of intense, flaring beauty such as this morning's will be utterly forgotten, dissolved by time like a super-8 film left out in the rain, without sound, and quickly replaced by thousands of silently growing trees."
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (2)

Die Handlung dieses bereits 1992 in deutscher Sprache erschienenen Szeneromans (ID 46/92) ist schnell umrissen: 3 junge Aussteiger, die ihre "Mittzwanziger-Krise" gerade überstanden haben, lockern ihr recht eintöniges Leben in einer unbedeutenden Stadt mitten in der kalifornischen Wüste dadurch auf, daß sie sich gegenseitig "Gute-Nacht-Geschichten" erzählen. In diesen Geschichten, teils wahr, teils unwahr, teilen sie ihre Ansichten über Familie, Karriere, die amerikanische Konsum- und Yuppie-Gesellschaft, die Atombombe und anderes mit. Das mit comicartigen Zeichnungen und einem Glossar des "Twentysomething-Jargons" interessant aufgemachte Kultbuch bleibt seiner Zielgruppe, der Generation der zwischen 1960 und 1970 Geborenen, in Deutschland wohl wegen seiner ständigen Bezugnahme auf das amerikanische Lebensgefühl dieser "Generation X" weitgehend unverständlich. - Auch in dieser preisgünstigeren Ausgabe nur Großstadtbibliotheken empfohlen. (Jutta Olbrich) Der comicartig aufgelockerte Szeneroman porträtiert Jargon und Lebensgefühl der Mitt-Zwanziger-Generation in den USA. (Jutta Olbrich)

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.68)
0.5 1
1 18
1.5 7
2 96
2.5 31
3 327
3.5 72
4 418
4.5 50
5 250

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 166,130,699 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar