StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Eric Sloane's Weather Book von Eric…
Lädt ...

Eric Sloane's Weather Book (Original 1952; 1952. Auflage)

von Eric Sloane, Eric Sloane (Illustrator)

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen
316265,323 (3.82)Keine
"Amateur weather forecasters (which includes just about everyone) will find this volume an informative and entertaining account of the why and how of the weather." -- The Nation In simple language, Eric Sloane explains the whys and wherefores of weather and weather forecasting -- and does it in a style that's universally appealing. With humor and common sense shining through in a book that's also lively and informative, Sloane shows readers how to predict the weather by "reading" such natural phenomena as winds, skies, and animal sounds. This beautifully illustrated and practical treasure trove of climate lore will enlighten outdoorsmen, farmers, sailors, and anyone else who has ever wondered what a large halo around the moon means, why birds "sit it out" before a storm, and whether or not to take an umbrella when leaving the house.… (mehr)
Mitglied:AutocratHolmes
Titel:Eric Sloane's Weather Book
Autoren:Eric Sloane
Weitere Autoren:Eric Sloane (Illustrator)
Info:Duell, Sloan and Pearce (1952), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 90 pages
Sammlungen:Deine Bibliothek
Bewertung:
Tags:Keine

Werk-Informationen

Eric Sloane's Weather Book von Eric Sloane (1952)

Keine
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

Keine aktuelle Diskussion zu diesem Buch.

Full of interesting and useful diagrams, e.g. showing how warm and cold fronts move differently with the analogy of water added to a bath. It's got me the closest to understanding weather that I have ever been. But it is quite old -- it claims that from the moon the earth's continents would not be visible -- so it would be interesting to know what has been superceded. ( )
1 abstimmen annesadleir | Oct 11, 2012 |
Sloane illustrates a basic presentation of the way weather works, in a format originally intended for sailors but expanded and revised so that pilots can learn from it as well.
The simplest form of wind, the daytime sea breeze and the night land breeze, illustrates how heated air moves up and cooler air moves in to replace it. Warm air is lighter; so is wet air. also, air flows from a high pressure area toward a low pressure one. On a weather map, the isobars encircling a high are usually farther apart than those around a low; lows have steeper gradients and higher winds (close isobars are accompanied by wind. At earth levels, wind moves from high to low pressure, crossing the isobars at about 45 degrees. But at altitude, the wind flows with the isobars, clockwise around highs and counterclockwise around lows (in the northern hemisphere).
A front is the front wall of an advancing mass of air of a different temperature. A cold front slants backward and a warm front slants forward. The cold front leaves clear, cold, dry air in its wake, while the warm front leaves warm, wet air behind. The faster, steeper cold front causes shorter, harder rains, while the warm front features longer and slower rains. The cold front covers a hundred miles or less; the warm front might be eight hundred miles long. As a warm front advances, we get the very top first in the form of cirrus mare’s tails, then cirrostratus, a fairly complete web of clouds. Next comes still lower altostratus, almost but not quite opaque to the sun. Finally the low and shaggy nimbostratus arrives with a slow rain. When a cold front advances, its snowplow nose pushed up the warm air into violent thunderheads, with cumulus rapidly becoming cumulonimbus. A faster cold front can overtake a slower warm one, and the result, an occluded front (points and bumps on the same side of the line) results in wind and hard rain and continues to move. But when a cold front collides with a warm front, the result is a stationary front with lingering rain. Winds in advance of a cold front usually flow at right angles to the approaching storm line. Winds blow clockwise out of a high pressure area and into a low pressure area counterclockwise.
Sloane illustrates the way air is heated by the ground, forms a heat canopy which leans with the wind, then breaks free as a thermal cell, and begins to circulate air, bringing warm moist air up to condense and become a cloud. He says there are really only three kinds of clouds: lumps (cumulus), layers (stratus), and icy (cirrus). Alto means high, nimbus means head (rain).
He catalogues the kinds of fog: advection, caused by warm air flowing over cool ground (two variations: steam fog and upslope fog); radiation, caused by the earth losing heat to the night air; and precipitation, relatively warm rain or snow falling through cold air.
Concluding chapters deal with cyclonic winds and atmospheric effects. ( )
1 abstimmen michaelm42071 | Sep 7, 2009 |
keine Rezensionen | Rezension hinzufügen
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Wichtige Ereignisse
Zugehörige Filme
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Widmung
Erste Worte
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Originalsprache
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch

Keine

"Amateur weather forecasters (which includes just about everyone) will find this volume an informative and entertaining account of the why and how of the weather." -- The Nation In simple language, Eric Sloane explains the whys and wherefores of weather and weather forecasting -- and does it in a style that's universally appealing. With humor and common sense shining through in a book that's also lively and informative, Sloane shows readers how to predict the weather by "reading" such natural phenomena as winds, skies, and animal sounds. This beautifully illustrated and practical treasure trove of climate lore will enlighten outdoorsmen, farmers, sailors, and anyone else who has ever wondered what a large halo around the moon means, why birds "sit it out" before a storm, and whether or not to take an umbrella when leaving the house.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.82)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 6
4.5
5 4

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 164,610,129 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar