StartseiteGruppenForumStöbernZeitgeist
Web-Site durchsuchen
Diese Seite verwendet Cookies für unsere Dienste, zur Verbesserung unserer Leistungen, für Analytik und (falls Sie nicht eingeloggt sind) für Werbung. Indem Sie LibraryThing nutzen, erklären Sie dass Sie unsere Nutzungsbedingungen und Datenschutzrichtlinie gelesen und verstanden haben. Die Nutzung unserer Webseite und Dienste unterliegt diesen Richtlinien und Geschäftsbedingungen.
Hide this

Ergebnisse von Google Books

Auf ein Miniaturbild klicken, um zu Google Books zu gelangen.

Lädt ...

Cleopatra: A Life

von Stacy Schiff

Weitere Autoren: Siehe Abschnitt Weitere Autoren.

MitgliederRezensionenBeliebtheitDurchschnittliche BewertungDiskussionen / Diskussionen
3,8261692,607 (3.67)1 / 352
Die glänzend erzählte Lebensgeschichte der legendären ägyptischen Königin Kleopatra VII., letzter weiblicher Pharao Ägyptens, ist heute hinter Mythen, übler Nachrede und märchenhafter Schönheit verborgen. Stacy Schiff , Pulitzer-Preisträgerin, zeigt in ihrer Biografie dank intensiver Recherche und neuer Auswertung antiker Quellen nicht nur die laszive Verführerin und das intrigante Machtweib, sondern enthüllt eine außerordentlich starke Herrscherin - selbstbewusst, versiert in politischem Kalkül, diplomatisch und visionär. Detailfülle und Mut zum zugespitzten historischen Urteil, sprachliche Eleganz und provokantspritzige Porträts der mächtigen Mit- und Gegenspieler an Kleopatras Seite versetzen den Leser ins alte Reich am Nil mit seinem weltläufigen Charme und seiner machtpolitischen Unerbittlichkeit. Stacy Schiff wurde 1961 geboren. Ihre Biografie 'Saint-Exupéry' ist mit internationalen Preisen ausgezeichnet und 1995 für den Pulitzer-Preis nominiert worden, den sie 2000 für 'Véra' erhielt.… (mehr)
  1. 30
    Kleopatra. Der Roman ihres Lebens. 2 Bände. von Margaret George (Anonymer Nutzer)
    Anonymer Nutzer: Although long, this is an excellent book. Written in first person and thoroughly researched, it really opens your eyes to what an outstanding person Cleopatra was.
  2. 10
    Antony and Cleopatra von Adrian Goldsworthy (bookfitz)
  3. 10
    The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy von Adrienne Mayor (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Both offer an outsider's (and antagonist's) perspective on Roman history.
  4. 10
    Wir drucken! von Katharine Graham (Menagerie)
    Menagerie: Two strong women that lived centuries apart but faced many of the same obstacles.
  5. 10
    The Rise and Fall of Alexandria: Birthplace of the Modern World von Justin Pollard (davesmind)
Lädt ...

Melde dich bei LibraryThing an um herauszufinden, ob du dieses Buch mögen würdest.

» Siehe auch 352 Erwähnungen/Diskussionen

Well written, organized, and interesting topic that I knew nothing about. ( )
  kathp | Jun 10, 2022 |
Cleopatra: A Life is a biography about the historical figure of Cleopatra. It is more than just a biography however. It discusses many different aspects of her life. The historical importance of her rule, what her economy was at the time, and how she greatly influenced other historical figures during her surprisingly short rule. I would recommend this for ancient Egyptian history buffs and for people who want to learn something interesting about Cleopatra. ( )
  douglasedrich | Apr 11, 2022 |
“It is not difficult to understand why Caesar became history, Cleopatra a legend.”

I heard of this book thanks to The Daily Show. I love bios about royal women and the author is obviously super-smart. So I went out and bought the book, and I promptly left it unread for a couple of years. (That’s a bad habit of mine.) The whole kerfuffle over Sony’s film adaptation brought it back to my attention.

Stacy Schiff gleefully debunks everything you thought you knew about Cleopatra. No, she wasn’t Egyptian. Not only was she Greek, she came from the same Macedonian stock as Alexander the Great. Yes, Cleopatra slept with both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, but she probably didn’t have to work hard to seduce two known womanizers decades older than she. No, her appeal did not come from drop-dead gorgeousness, but rather from intelligence, wit, and a sexy voice. (Actually, Cleopatra wasn’t described as a great beauty until after her death. It surely helped with the narrative of a man-eating, power-hungry femme fatale.)

But once you scrape away the myth – or as Schiff charmingly calls it, “the kudzu of history” – there’s not a lot of meat left. Schiff is very upfront about not having much to work with. Unlike with Caesar or Mark Anthony, none of Cleopatra’s writings remain. Surviving historical records don’t appear until more than a century after her death in 30 BC, and their accuracy is questionable to say the least. While Plutarch (AD 46-120) admires her and takes a more flattering approach, Cassius Dio (AD 155–235) has no qualms portraying her as a scheming, greedy hussy. (Keep in mind that Dio was greatly influenced by Octavian, Cleopatra’s nemesis and the conquerer of Egypt. As always, history is written by the victors.)

So what does that mean for this particular bio? Essentially, Schiff is reinterpreting biased accounts. Her method is to present a solid fact, and then reasonably conjecture around that fact. Cleopatra was born in 69 BC. Her upbringing would have been like this. Cleopatra regained control of the throne in 47 BC. On a typical day she would have done this. These passages are enlightening, yes, but focus on Cleopatra herself tends to get lost in them. It doesn’t help that she is surrounded by men whose stories are better documented. Mark Antony and Octavian probably get as much page time as the leading lady. Even Herod – yes, that Herod – gets a pretty in-depth aside.

If it ever gets off the ground, I’m curious about what the movie would do with Cleopatra’s story. It’s more entertaining, as well as easier, to depict this powerful woman as a sexpot rather than a politician or CEO. Her transformation is the most fascinating part of this book. History, as written by men, stripped her of every power except her sexuality, and then condemned her for using that sexuality. Three and a half stars. ( )
  doryfish | Jan 29, 2022 |
I have tried to read this book twice and always put it up a hundred pages through. I honestly do not know why. It is not badly written. ( )
  Joe73 | Oct 19, 2021 |
Schiff does a fantastic job in bringing Cleopatra to life: the drama, the sensuality, the politics. However, I did end up giving this 4 out of 5 stars because, in the way I was reading it, she doesn’t try to bring Cleopatra back from the brink that society has put her at; in my opinion, modern society has overly sexualized Cleopatra and turned her into a bad/wicked woman because she was ambitious and openly sought power. Schiff doesn’t try to break that mold, which slightly bothers me. However, I do realize that this may not have been the intent of the book.
I did really like this overall, and it was very interesting to learn about the more detailed aspects of Cleopatra’s live, especially given the fact that she is closer in time to us than she is to the pyramids. I liked how Schiff included quotes at the beginning of each chapter. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
" Ideally, as Stacy Schiff observes in her magnificent re-creation of both an extraordinary woman, and her times, our sense of Cleopatra would be heightened by her dramatic appearance as the doomed heroine of a sumptuous opera (Puccini, preferably)."
hinzugefügt von bookfitz | bearbeitenThe Guardian, Miranda Seymour (Jan 21, 2011)
 
Her life of Cleopatra is slightly soft-focused, as if she has applied Vaseline to the lens. It leaves the impression that, like a student taking an exam, she knows only a little more than what she writes. Sometimes she nods; to say, as she does, that Roman women were without legal rights is incorrect, although they were not allowed to hold political office. That said, she has done her homework and writes elegantly and wittily, creating truly evocative word pictures.

hinzugefügt von jburlinson | bearbeitenThe Independent, Anthony Everitt (Dec 10, 2010)
 
"Successfully dissipating all the perfume, Schiff finds a remarkably complex woman—brutal and loving, dependent and independent, immensely strong but finally vulnerable."
hinzugefügt von bookfitz | bearbeitenKirkus Reviews (Sep 15, 2010)
 

» Andere Autoren hinzufügen (37 möglich)

AutorennameRolleArt des AutorsWerk?Status
Stacy SchiffHauptautoralle Ausgabenberechnet
Ahlström, LarsÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Decréau, LaurenceÜbersetzerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Miles, RobinErzählerCo-Autoreinige Ausgabenbestätigt
Du musst dich einloggen, um "Wissenswertes" zu bearbeiten.
Weitere Hilfe gibt es auf der "Wissenswertes"-Hilfe-Seite.
Gebräuchlichster Titel
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originaltitel
Alternative Titel
Ursprüngliches Erscheinungsdatum
Figuren/Charaktere
Wichtige Schauplätze
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Wichtige Ereignisse
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Zugehörige Filme
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Preise und Auszeichnungen
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Epigraph (Motto/Zitat)
Die Informationen sind von der französischen Wissenswertes-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
I
L'Egyprienne

« Sagesse et méfiance, il n’est rien ici-bas qui soit plus profitable ! »
Euripide, Hélène
Widmung
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Finally, for Max, Millie, and Jo
Erste Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Among the most famous women to have lived, Cleopatra VII ruled Egypt for twenty-two years.
Zitate
Letzte Worte
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
(Zum Anzeigen anklicken. Warnung: Enthält möglicherweise Spoiler.)
Hinweis zur Identitätsklärung
Verlagslektoren
Werbezitate von
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Originalsprache
Die Informationen stammen von der englischen "Wissenswertes"-Seite. Ändern, um den Eintrag der eigenen Sprache anzupassen.
Anerkannter DDC/MDS
Anerkannter LCC

Literaturhinweise zu diesem Werk aus externen Quellen.

Wikipedia auf Englisch (2)

Die glänzend erzählte Lebensgeschichte der legendären ägyptischen Königin Kleopatra VII., letzter weiblicher Pharao Ägyptens, ist heute hinter Mythen, übler Nachrede und märchenhafter Schönheit verborgen. Stacy Schiff , Pulitzer-Preisträgerin, zeigt in ihrer Biografie dank intensiver Recherche und neuer Auswertung antiker Quellen nicht nur die laszive Verführerin und das intrigante Machtweib, sondern enthüllt eine außerordentlich starke Herrscherin - selbstbewusst, versiert in politischem Kalkül, diplomatisch und visionär. Detailfülle und Mut zum zugespitzten historischen Urteil, sprachliche Eleganz und provokantspritzige Porträts der mächtigen Mit- und Gegenspieler an Kleopatras Seite versetzen den Leser ins alte Reich am Nil mit seinem weltläufigen Charme und seiner machtpolitischen Unerbittlichkeit. Stacy Schiff wurde 1961 geboren. Ihre Biografie 'Saint-Exupéry' ist mit internationalen Preisen ausgezeichnet und 1995 für den Pulitzer-Preis nominiert worden, den sie 2000 für 'Véra' erhielt.

Keine Bibliotheksbeschreibungen gefunden.

Buchbeschreibung
Zusammenfassung in Haiku-Form

Beliebte Umschlagbilder

Gespeicherte Links

Bewertung

Durchschnitt: (3.67)
0.5 1
1 17
1.5 2
2 65
2.5 14
3 146
3.5 62
4 276
4.5 37
5 123

Bist das du?

Werde ein LibraryThing-Autor.

Hachette Book Group

3 Ausgaben dieses Buches wurden von Hachette Book Group veröffentlicht.

Ausgaben: 0316001929, 0316120448, 1607887010

 

Über uns | Kontakt/Impressum | LibraryThing.com | Datenschutz/Nutzungsbedingungen | Hilfe/FAQs | Blog | LT-Shop | APIs | TinyCat | Nachlassbibliotheken | Vorab-Rezensenten | Wissenswertes | 171,643,095 Bücher! | Menüleiste: Immer sichtbar